Recovery Live Podcasts

Recovery Live Podcasts - Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a few key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them

Recovery Live Podcasts

Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a few key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them.

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Travis Meadows

Travis Meadows Podcast – God did for me what I couldn’t do for myself.

Liz talks candidly with “Nashville’s Favorite Underdog” Travis Meadows about losing his brother at a young age, cancer, addiction and his treatment journal that inspired an album. Even with so much success, writing songs for Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Wynonna Judd, Meadows says his biggest triumph is making it this far in his sobriety journey.

 
Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection

Jaime Gibbons Podcast – Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Liz sits down with Jaime Gibbons – Cumberland Heights’ Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator – to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime’s greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It’s a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

Dear Friends,

Thank you for your gifts to Cumberland Heights in 2016. Your generosity enabled us to offer a foundation for recovery to those seeking our help. For more than 50 years, we’ve played a major role in helping build foundations and impacting lives for the thousands who have passed through our gate. We couldn’t have done it without the caring support of our community.

With strong leadership from our Board and staff, we’ll continue to expand in the next 50 years, offering many more patients an opportunity to recover life.

This donor report shares with you our achievements and recognizes those who partnered with us. Thank you for helping us build a place where many come to recover life…thank you for making a difference and changing hundreds of lives of individuals and their families today and for decades to come.

Sincerely,

Jay Crosson, Chief Executive Officer

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year.

What gifts we all have the most precious of which is each other — that we have one another and can help one another. Miracles happen, and they happen to us.

—Dr. Arch MacNair, Former Chaplain

Dear Friends,

Gifts from generous donors like you make healing possible each year for hundreds of individuals and families who come to us to recover their lives from addiction. Your donations help us to enhance our services, provide patient assistance funding, improve our capital facilities and educate the community on the disease of addiction.

In this report, we have highlighted a few of the experiential therapies we use in treatment. These non-traditional therapies give the counselors ways to meet the patients where they can best relate and express themselves. The counselors can then address repressed feelings and emotions and give the patients ways to face issues or triggers without turning to drugs and alcohol.

Know that when a patient gets the chance to pick up a paint brush or play their own song, as part of a therapeutic activity, you have helped to make it possible. Your gift helps change lives one patient, one family at a time and creates a ripple effect for generations to come.

Sincerely,

Jay Crosson, Chief Executive Officer

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year.

What gifts we all have the most precious of which is each other — that we have one another and can help one another. Miracles happen, and they happen to us.

—Dr. Arch MacNair, Former Chaplain

Original Article by: Brittany Weiner, WSMV NEWS CHANNEL 4
Originally Posted on: January 29, 2019

As our country fights an opioid crisis, prescriptions for another class of drugs are seeing a steep increase, and they too can be dangerous and addictive. A new study just published this month shows between 2003 and 2015 Benzodiazepine prescriptions have doubled, and about half of them are coming from primary care physicians. Women are twice as likely to be prescribed than men.

Benzodiazepines are used for anxiety and insomnia but they can also be prescribed for chronic pain, and those prescriptions are skyrocketing. “Benzodiazepines are a class of medication that have a significant addiction forming liability,” Chief Medical Officer for Cumberland Heights Foundation, Dr. Chapman Sledge said. “If opioid prescribing goes down there’s some concern that Benzodiazepine prescriptions will continue to go up.” Dr. Sledge says many times these drugs are actually prescribed with opioids. “What we usually see if Benzodiazepine dependence in conjunction with opioid dependence or alcohol dependence,” Dr. Sledge said. A combination that can be dangerous and deadly especially if used long-term.

“Benzodiazepines are not benign drugs,” Dr. Sledge said. “There’s good data that suggests the combination of Benzodiazepines and opioids prescribed together increases the risk of death by fourfold.” According to the study long-term use has also increased with continued prescriptions increasing by 50 percent.

Safe Start – Cumberland Heights’ Response to the Opioid Crisis
We created Safe Start, a recommended medication-assisted treatment to anyone diagnosed with a moderate to severe opioid abuse disorder

Safe Start

In 2017, nearly 70,000 people died from drug-related overdoses, and research shows opioid abuse is more rampant than ever. A report from the National Safety Council says more people died from accidental opioid overdoses than car crashes in 2017.

Cumberland Heights is very in tune with the epidemic and that’s why we created Safe Start, our official response to the opioid crisis. Safe Start is medication-assisted treatment and recommended to anyone diagnosed with a moderate to severe opioid abuse disorder.

Essentially, it’s extended release Naltrexone, a long-acting opioid antagonist used to reduce cravings. Naltrexone blocks the effects of opioids if they are used. Unlike other medications used to treat opioid addiction like methadone, there is no chance of dependency with Naltrexone. Naltrexone can also be an effective treatment for alcohol addiction.

Dr. Chapman Sledge, Chief Medical Officer at Cumberland Heights says as a stand-alone treatment Naltrexone is not effective. “The basis of a strong spiritual foundation in the recovery process is essential. Medication is only part of the solution,” said Sledge.

The Proof

Before the FDA approved Naltrexone for opioid dependence in 2010, they conducted a study dividing opioid addicts, primarily heroin users into two groups going through the same course of treatment. The only difference was one group got extended release Naltrexone and the other group was given placebo. The groups were monitored for 24 weeks. The group that got the Naltrexone injection had 90% abstinence confirmed on urine drug screens compared to 35% abstinence among the group that got the placebo injection. As a secondary measure, the study looked at cravings. Cravings were decreased by 55% in the group that received the extended release Naltrexone injection. In the group that got the placebo, cravings increased.

How it Works

This is how Safe Start looks for a patient coming into Cumberland Heights: Once the patient is evaluated and it is determined Naltrexone would be a good tool for them in their recovery, they will detox in a safe residential setting and then have 7-10 days for the receptors to clear before staff administers Naltrexone.

As they continue with their recovery, and transition out of residential treatment, Cumberland Heights sets them up with a plan that ensures they get their shot every 28 days. Dr. Sledge says it is reasonable to discuss discontinuing Naltrexone after a year if recovery is solid.

If you or someone you know is struggling with Opioid Dependence or Opioid Addiction, please visit our Admissions section to learn more about what to do and how we can help.


Dear Friends,

Every morning when I drive through Cumberland Heights’ arched gates, I am thankful for the opportunity to help patients and families “recover life.” And every night when I leave, I am reminded to “Let go and let God,” and am grateful for the thousands of little things our staff members do each day as they walk new paths of recovery with our patients.

What our entire Board of Directors and I appreciate most is the generosity of the Cumberland Heights community – donors and volunteers alike – who support our mission. Throughout the pages of this report, you will see how much Cumberland Heights has grown since we started in 1966 with only three patients and a handful of staff.

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year. Thank you for helping change the lives of our current patients, families, alumni and all those who will seek our help in the years to come.

Sincerely,
Jay Crosson, Chief Executive Officer

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year.

What gifts we all have the most precious of which is each other — that we have one another and can help one another. Miracles happen, and they happen to us.

—Dr. Arch MacNair, Former Chaplain

Original By: AMY ESKIND
Posted On: September 25, 2017

NPR: Combining Dangerous Drugs Pushes Tennessee Overdose Deaths To Record High
NPR: How Drug Combos Are Making Tennessee’s Opioid Problem Even More Deadly

The combining of powerful drugs — both purposeful and unintentional — is making Tennessee’s opioid epidemic even more deadly. The latest figures out this month show 2016 was another record year for overdoses in the state — more than 1,600 people died. And experts say risky drug cocktails are compounding the problem.

Emergency responders have answered hundreds of 9-1-1 calls from friends and family members of people who have overdosed. Last year Davidson County lost 261 people to overdose, almost all of them from opiates. On the street, heroin is a cheaper opiate than pills. Many users are looking for whatever will give them the highest high, says recovering addict Mary Barton Lea.

“When I was buying my heroin I said, ‘who’s got the heroin with the fentanyl?’” she says. “That’s the heroin I want.”

Fentanyl is a very strong opiate that magnifies the experience and lasts longer. Experts expect to see more of it coming into Middle Tennessee.

“It’s a sleep-like state, it’s a state that you feel secure,” Lea says. “I’ve read — and I tend to agree with this — it’s almost like kissing God, because it takes you to a place you’ve never been before.”

But that incredible high comes with a physical and mental addiction, Lea says.

“When you come down from that state, all your body says is I want to get back there…You get up there quick, but then there’s a crash and the crash is horrible. The crash is you will do anything within your power to get more.”

Serious addicts like Lea may be willing to flirt with death. Others are simply unaware, says Sam MacMaster. He’s the chief clinical officer at JourneyPure, an addiction treatment provider. He warns that no one can be sure what they’re buying in the illegal market.

How Drug Combos Are Making Tennessee's Opioid Problem Even More Deadly
Sadly, 2016 was another record year for overdoses in the state — more than 1,600 people died. And experts say risky drug cocktails are compounding the problem.

“You would not be able to tell [by] how it looks at all, and that’s the issue,” MacMaster says. “They believe that they’re purchasing typically heroin or sometimes even a pilled opiate but it’s been cut with fentanyl.”

Indeed, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency issued a warning about counterfeit Vicodin and Oxycontin pills. As with heroin, unscrupulous dealers add fentanyl to give themselves a marketing edge — they’ve got the strong stuff.

But some users are buying the laced drugs unknowingly. They may erroneously think it’s stronger because it’s more pure. The next thing they know, they can’t breathe. Then their heart stops.

“If I believe I’m shooting x-amount of heroin, I may in fact be shooting something that is much more potent. And while I may have a sense of what my body can handle, I’ll have no idea what my body can handle in terms of the fentanyl,” MacMaster says.

Some dealers are even lacing their supplies with carfentanil, a veterinary opiate that can knock out a rhino.

But lethal combinations go beyond various opioids. Users have also been adding prescription anxiety medications, such as Xanax, Valium or Klonopin. Not only is that a doubling up on medications that depress the central nervous system, experts worn there can be a multiplier effect. And it’s hitting teens and young adults hard, especially since many of them already have anti-anxiety prescriptions. Others have painkillers, maybe prescribed for an injury.

“There’s actually prescription parties where kids will have a party and everybody raids the medicine cabinets they can get to, brings them to the party, and then you have whatever you have at that party for people to experiment with,” says Cinde Stewart Freeman, chief clinical officer at Cumberland Heights, an addiction treatment center.

Cole Szabo, adolescent specialist at Cumberland Heights, says the days when kids stuck to beer and marijuana are gone.

“The benzos and opioids are the new gateway drug,” he says. And it’s in the schools. “You’re seeing Xanax, you’re seeing benzos, you’re seeing hydrocodones, oxycodones, Vicodin – you’re seeing that more. The problem with that is, you’re going to die quickly. It’s a quick death, you’re going down fast.”

If administered in time a nasal spray called Narcan that reverses the effects of opiates can save a life. Emergency responders in Nashville have used it on more than 500 people already this year.

But Narcan has no effect on other drugs like anti-anxiety pills, cocaine, or alcohol, so combination overdoses can still prove lethal. That was unfortunately the case for Max Barry, the son of Nashville’s mayor, who could not be revived with Narcan, and died over the summer in Colorado with much more than opiates in his system.


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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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