AUTHOR: Nancy Floyd | PHOTOGRAPHER: Eric England | DATE: APRIL 28, 2017

 

The Reaching New Heights luncheon for Cumberland Heights reached new heights indeed with a record-size crowd showing up for the annual women’s fundraiser at Hillwood Country Club. Co-chairs Grace Clayton and Kathleen Estes joked that they’d like to take all of the credit for the sold-out event, but they knew the real draw was keynote speaker Jeannette Walls, the best-selling author of The Glass Castle, The Silver Star and Half Broke Horses.

 

Fans of The Glass Castle — which appeared to be just about everyone in the room — were thrilled to hear Jeannette recount many of the memoir’s most remarkable stories along with several other tales from her unconventional childhood. Alternating between humor and poignancy, Jeannette took the audience on a journey from her troubled upbringing to her discontented young adulthood to the place of peace and acceptance she found once she learned to embrace her past. And at an event benefiting Cumberland Heights, which provides treatment for drug and alcohol addiction, Jeannette’s heartfelt words about her alcoholic father resonated with everyone in the crowd, particularly a story about how, as a child, she hunted for an imaginary monster called Demon with her dad in the Arizona desert.

 

“He couldn’t battle his own demons, but he gave me the tools to battle mine,” she shared.

 

Jeannette proved to be as down-to-earth, funny and warm as she comes across in her books, chatting and posing for photos with women before the luncheon and long after it concluded. For someone who has been wildly successful in her career, it’s obvious Jeannette’s true passion is finding ways to use her past to help others. Prior to the luncheon, when asked how it feels to share her story with a roomful of women who have battled addiction or been touched by it in some way, she said, “It doesn’t get any better than that. That’s what it’s about. That’s what storytelling is about … It’s connecting with people and having your story mean something.” Her story certainly meant something to this crowd and to Cumberland Heights, which raised $140,000 at the luncheon for the women’s program, funds that will go a long way in offering redemption and hope to countless women across Middle Tennessee and beyond.

 

Photo Gallery of the Reaching New Heights luncheon for Cumberland Heights Event

04/21/2017 Original Article by

MusiCares Hosts Addiction Recovery Panel That Will Include Bad Company's Simon Kirke
By: Ray Tamarra/Getty Images
Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke photographed at Grant Gallery on Jan. 19, 2006 in New York City.

Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke will join a MusiCares panel dedicated to treating artists and other music professionals who’ve become addicted to drugs and alcohol. Kirke, who works closely with Road Recovery, an organization that uses musicians to mentor teens battling addiction, will take part in “Plugged In…Treating The Music Professional and Leading Them Toward a Lifetime of Recovery.” The luncheon and discussion will take place beginning at 11:30 am on April 27 at the BMI/New York offices, located at 7 World Trade Center.

 

“We want managers, A&R people and musicians to come to this so that they can learn to recognize the signs of addiction so that they can act to help a fellow band member or an artist they’re working with before it gets bad,” says Neil Lasher, a consultant in promotions and artist relations at Sony/ATV Music Publishing and a certified interventionist, who will moderate the panel of intervention and recovery experts.

 

Those scheduled to take part include Dr. Chapman Sledge, the chief medical director of Cumberland Heights, a Nashville-based non-profit alcohol and drug treatment center; Miles Adcox, the CEO and owner of Onsite, a dependency treatment center that’s also located in Nashville; Paul Gallant, a Master’s level licensed professional counselor, Certified Intervention Professional and founder of Primary Recovery Services in Greenwich, Conn.; Gene Bowen the founder of Road Recovery and Gregg Allman’s former road manager; and MusiCares vice chairman Michael McDonald, the founder and CEO of Mick Management, which represents Maggie Rogers, Hamilton Leithauser and Sharon Van Etten.

 

Lasher, who has been in recovery for 30 years — and who, in 1997, played a leading role in establishing the MusiCares Safe Harbor Room (a sober backstage area at the Grammy Awards that is set up every year) — tells Billboard that, given the epidemic of opioid abuse and over-prescription in the United States, the panel is intended as a preventative measure.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevent (CDC), the number of overdose deaths from opioids, including prescription opioids, has quadrupled since 1999 and claimed more than half a million people between 2000 and 2015. On April 21, 2016, Prince died from an accidental overdose of the opioid fentanyl, and Lasher says, “Of all my years going to 12-step meetings, I see more people with double-digit [years of] sobriety to their credit, [relapse] because of over-prescribed opioids.”

 

Although there is no evidence that the music industry has been more affected by opioid abuse than other business sectors, McDonald says musicians can be more susceptible to addiction in general because “they are often tortured souls. They often don’t fit into the 9-to-5 mold, and they like emotional unrest and the highs and lows,” which they can channel into their art.

 

When it comes to intervention and recovery, working with musical artists also tends to be more complex, says Gallant. “Normally, when I’m coordinating an intervention, I’ll talk to five people,” he explains. “With an artist, there could easily be a dozen: You’ve got family, the record company, management, the artist’s publicist and other band members and their family. And while some of those people genuinely care about the guy, others see him as a paycheck… that can get challenging in terms of clinical recommendations versus business obligations.”

 

The panel and luncheon are free, but seating is limited. See the flyer below for additional information.

MusiCares Hosts Addiction Recovery Panel

The annual Reaching New Heights Luncheon to benefit nonprofit Cumberland Heights was held at Nashville’s Hillwood Country Club. This year’s guest speaker was Jeannette Walls, author of The Glass Castle.

The popular fundraiser for the alcohol and drug-addiction recovery center was co-chaired by Grace Clayton and Kathleen Estes, with a committee of about three-dozen volunteers working on the event—including a Gentlemen’s Committee.

2017 Reaching New Heights Luncheon Photos

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A hard hit can do more than just knock the wind out of a player on the field. It can leave them with an injury requiring medical attention and possibly pain medication.
“Sports are probably the leading cause of injury in kids but I think it is important to understand that sports in general are protective,” Dr. Alex Diamond said. “We know kids who play sports compared to kids who don’t are typically less likely to be involved in risky behaviors.”

 
High school sports injuries can lead to addiction depending on treatmentDr. Diamond is an assistant professor of Orthopedics and Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is also the team physician for Vanderbilt University, Nashville Predators and the Nashville sounds. He along with the other physicians at in his department treated 26,000 adult and children athletes in 2016.
“As physicians we need to be mindful when treating children with injuries what situation require pain medication and what situations can be handled without pain medication,” he said. “Most of them can be handled without pain medications.”

 
Pain medications like hydrocodone, oxycodone and other opioids can be very effective in treating chronic pain. But, they can also be addictive and lead to more illicit drugs like heroin.

 
At Cumberland Heights, a non-profit addiction treatment facility, the number of teens entering the facility’s Adolescent and Young Men’s Services department has grown so much in the past couple of months it is expanding to keep up with the need.

 
“We take kids from all over the country,” Director of Adolescent and Young Men’s Services Dean Porterfield said. “The primary diagnosis is substance abuse, but It is not uncommon though that the underlying issues once you take those substances away are anxiety, depression or trauma.”

 
According to Porter for the 18 year old to 25 year old age group that makes up the Young Men’s program a growing number are addicted to heroin.

 
“A notable factor with the young adult population that we serve is that several of them are athletes who have experienced high school or college sports injuries that have required surgery and have become addicted to painkillers.”

 
He continued, “When the painkillers run out or they become more expensive the more accessible affordable drug is the heroin. That replaces what used to be that passion for sports and athletics and now their primary goal is to drug seek.”

 
Porterfield said with heroin it is not uncommon for the treatment center to get a call from family or the patient themselves saying they are in route for immediate admission to the facility.

 
“They are also some of the most vulnerable patients and need a great deal of attention throughout the painful detox and early days of treatment to prevent them from leaving against medical advice,” he said. “One of the things Cumberland Heights clinicians have made a priority is educating these young men on the risks of relapse and the lethal dangers associated with resuming the volume of heroin use they came in handling with the assumption their tolerance level is the same.”

 
He continued, “This scenario increases the likely hood of a lethal overdose.”

 
At Cumberland Heights the process is based on the 12-Steps.

 
After detox the work begins to help the young men understand the underlying reasons they abused drugs. In many cases its tied to the emotion effect their injury had on them and their identities.

 
“Just being an adolescent adult in general is full of ups and downs,” Porterfield said. “When they realize this substance can help alleviate that, they get hooked pretty quick.”
The same progression from painkillers to heroin and stronger opioids is much the same in adult users.

 
According to the CDC Tennessee is one of the most overprescribed states for painkillers.

 
At one point doctor’s wrote more prescriptions for painkillers than there were people in the state.

 
“As physicians we need to be mindful when treating children with injuries about which situations require pain medication and what situations can be handled without pain medication,” he said.

 
“We have a lot of other options that don’t have the same complications and risk involved with addiction.”

 
Dr. Diamond said things like physical therapy, proper braces or casts and anti-inflammatory medications can be very effective.

 
“As a parent you need to be diligent on what pain medication your kids are getting,” he said. “For the most part the narcotic pain medication is not needed for what we are seeing in our children. It is very rare.”

 
Porterfield said parents should be involved in their teens lives take note if you start to notice missing money, missing prescription medication, if your child is hanging out with friends or in places you do not know, and if your child attends unsupervised parties.

 


Original Article: Green Hills News, Staff Writer, David Smith – February 22, 2017

Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
A retired bus operator let it be know that upon his death he wanted to donate his home.

But Timothy Cotton, a retired bus operator who drove for major country music stars Tim McGraw, Conway Twitty, Alan Jackson, Kathy Mattea and the country music group Lonestar, also had a more pointed message: he wanted the success he achieved in life to be a tool for people needing help.

The home at Setliff Place in East Nashville sold this January generating $285,000, all of which was donated to Cumberland Heights, an addiction treatment center.

“This home holds a special place in our heart,” said Mallory Gibson, who, along with her husband, purchased the home. “Our family also lives on Setliff Place and we will now be able to raise our children within walking distance of each other. Tim was deeply committed to his family and his community, and we look forward to honoring that legacy in this beautiful home.”

Following the transaction, Cumberland Heights announced the creation of the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance. The fund is part of Cumberland Heights’ endowment and will provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford treatment or do not have insurance to cover costs.

Cotton was himself a patient on a MusiCares scholarship.

“Tim Cotton was a generous soul who loved caring for others,” said Jay Crosson, chief executive officer at Cumberland Heights. “His incredible donation and the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance will help many, many people recover their life from drug and alcohol addiction. Tim’s memory will live on at Cumberland Heights in perpetuity.”

Cotton was renowned for his ability to make friends. He touched so many people in the Nashville recovery community that they organized aftercare meetings in his hospital room so he did not have to miss meetings.

After his death, Cotton’s sister Cathy Reisch, received numerous calls from former Cumberland Heights’ patients who had met Tim Cotton during treatment and were touched enough to call with condolences.

“The Cotton family is grateful to Bill Branch and Life Style Real Estate Advisors. Bill did more than donate his commission – he put his heart into this task, was very supportive to our entire family and dedicated a lot of time to make this sale happen for all the parties involved,” said Reisch.

Bill Branch of Life Style Real Estate Advisors served as broker and donated his commission because proceeds were being donated to Cumberland Heights.

Branch describes the experience as follows: “Tim Cotton loved his family, his home, and his neighborhood.”

Having worked with Cumberland Heights on several other real estate transactions to support their mission, it was immediately apparent to me that this was a very special situation. After meeting Tim’s sister Cathy Reisch for the first time, I wanted to be a part of helping to make Tim’s dreams and wishes for his home come true. We had two goals from the start: to raise as much money for Tim’s endowment to Cumberland Heights as possible through the sale of his home, and do as much as possible to find new stewards for the property that would love the home and the neighborhood as much as Tim did. On both counts, we succeeded beyond our hopes, and there will be many people benefiting from Tim’s beautiful heart and enormous generosity for years to come.”

Cotton was the 1991 Honoree for the Mary Catherine Strobel Award as Volunteer of the Year from Nashville CARES and trained HIV/AIDS volunteer.

Beloved long-time driver for music acts willed East Nashville home to Cumberland Heights

cumberland-heights-sets-up-the-timothy-cotton-fund-for-patient-assistance
Timothy Cotton

Cumberland Heights announces the creation of the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance that was made possible by sale of Tim Cotton’s home on Setliff Place in East Nashville.

Cotton was a former Cumberland Heights patient and long-time driver for many musical acts, including Tim McGraw, Alan Jackson, Lonestar, Kathy Mattea and Conway Twitty.

Cotton passed away in January 2016 and willed his Setliff Place home to Cumberland Heights. The home sold in January 2017. In total, the sale of Cotton’s home generated $285,000, all of which was donated to the fund.

“Tim Cotton was a generous soul who loved caring for others,” said Jay Crosson, chief executive officer at Cumberland Heights. “His incredible donation and the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance will help many, many people recover life from drug and alcohol addiction. Tim’s memory will live on at Cumberland Heights in perpetuity.”

The fund is part of Cumberland Heights’ endowment and will provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford treatment or do not have insurance that covers costs. Cotton was himself a patient on a MusiCares scholarship, so his gift back is especially meaningful.

“This home holds a special place in our heart,” said Mallory Gibson, who purchased this home with her husband. “Our family also lives on Setliff Place and we will now be able to raise our children within walking distance of each other. Tim was deeply committed to his family and his community, and we look forward to honoring that legacy in this beautiful home.”

Cotton was renowned for his ability to make friends. He touched so many people in the Nashville recovery community that they organized aftercare meetings in his hospital room so he did not have to miss meetings. After his death, Cotton’s sister Cathy Reisch received numerous calls from former Cumberland Heights’ patients who had met Tim during treatment and were touched enough to call with condolences.

Cotton was the 1991 Honoree for the Mary Catherine Strobel Award as Volunteer of the Year from Nashville CARES and trained HIV/AIDS volunteer.

Bill Branch of Life Style Real Estate Advisors served as broker donated his commission because proceeds were being donated to Cumberland Heights.

Branch describes the experience as follows: “Tim Cotton loved his family, his home, and his neighborhood. Having worked with Cumberland Heights on several other real estate transactions to support their mission, it was immediately apparent to me that this was a very special situation. After meeting Tim’s sister Cathy Reisch for the first time, I wanted to be a part of helping to make Tim’s dreams and wishes for his home come true. We had two goals from the start; 1) to raise as much money for Tim’s endowment to Cumberland Heights as possible through the sale of his home, and 2) do as much as possible to find new stewards for the property that would love the home and the neighborhood as much as Tim did. On both counts, we succeeded beyond our hopes, and there will be many people benefiting from Tim’s beautiful heart and enormous generosity for years to come.”

Cathy Reisch, said, “The Cotton family is grateful to Bill Branch and Life Style Real Estate Advisors. Bill did more than donate his commission – he put his heart into this task, was very supportive to our entire family and dedicated a lot of time to make this sale happen for all the parties involved.”

By: Mary Beth McCauley, Staff Writer at University of Tennessee Daily Beacon Feb 9, 2017 — Updated Feb 13, 2017

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour

Knoxville (Tennessee) had the chance to get up close and personal with Justin Furstenfeld, the lead vocalist of alternative rock group Blue October, at the Square Room in Market Square this past Wednesday.

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld's unique approach to his book tour
People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour and his story of recovery

Furstenfeld has been traveling to cities across the country to promote his book, “Crazy Making: The Words and Lyrics of Justin Furstenfeld to the Music of Blue October.” The “Open Book Tour” also gives Furstenfeld the opportunity to share stories regarding his struggle with addiction, depression and relationships along with playing an acoustic set in front of a small, intimate audience.

He kicked off the evening with “The Answer,” the title track of Blue October’s first album, and began to tell the audience about his own personal journey, starting with his teenage years. Furstenfeld led his first band called The Last Wish at only 15 years old, the age that he was officially diagnosed with depression. When the Last Wish split up, Furstenfeld went on to create Blue October.

Although Furstenfeld was raw and honest with the crowd, he told his stories with such charisma and humor that throughout the heartfelt details we were all laughing and smiling. He often reminded the crowd, “This is the open book tour. No holding back.” The auditorium felt like a room full of friends, a safe space to share their darkest secrets.

Furstenfeld played a few other songs from Blue October’s debut album, such as “Black Orchid” and “Breakfast After 10.” In these, the audience learned of his first love, Mamie, and how he forgot her birthday after two years of dating. His belated birthday song to her was “Calling You,” the song that scored Blue October a record deal.

He told the audience about his band’s first 15-passenger tour van — and their second one, and their third. He walked us down the path that began his drug addiction, partying on tour every night in hotel rooms and bars. During this same time, Furstenfeld met his first wife and had his first child, a baby girl named Blue, and that changed everything for him. The audience sat quietly absorbing every detail and feeling every emotion as he told his story.

He bravely shared the details of his divorce, the custody battle for his daughter and his spiral back into addiction. And, through all of these hardships, he continued to make music.

Furstenfeld pieced together all of the major events in his life one by one and sang us the songs that stemmed from those events, making them even more meaningful and emotional for the audience, many of which were already huge fans of Blue October.

Towards the end of the evening, Furstenfeld shared his redemption story. He went through a 75-day program at Cumberland Heights, a rehabilitation center in Nashville, and found his faith there. He has been sober for four years now. The audience cried, clapped and cheered for him, all rising to their feet in applause. Furstenfeld truly was an open book, and told his story bravely without shame, but with hope.

After the show, Furstenfeld took time to meet his fans, shaking hands and signing posters, all with a smile on his face. His merchandise sports the phrase “People Can Change,” the perfect summary of his journey thus far.

CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS TO OPEN
SECOND SOBER-LIVING HOME IN FOUR MONTHS

NASHVILLE, TENN. – Jan. 10, 2017 – Cumberland Heights will open a sober-living home for adult men this month, its second sober-living home opened in the last four months.

By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.
By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.

The Keep It Simple! House opens on January 16, will serve up to eight male clients at a time. Clients will stay a minimum of three months and must have completed a primary treatment program. Keep It Simple! joins Searchlight Sober Living for women opened in late October 2016.

 

Cumberland Heights sober living creates the right environment during the critical initial two-year period of recovery,” said Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson. “By adding sober living to residential inpatient, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs called Still Waters, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.”

 

Sober living allows residents to maintain contact with outpatient services and aftercare while integrating school, work and community responsibilities.

 

While other recovery residences exist, there has been a gap between the very high end providing many services resembling treatment and the very low end which is affordable but offers no services and often has high turnover,” said Executive Director for Community-Based Services Randal Lea. “Cumberland has secured safe housing at affordable rates in established neighborhoods.”

 

Cumberland Heights’ sober homes operate on a “social model” where residents share responsibility and accountability, which fosters greater independence from treatment or authority figures. The male residence is in Murfreesboro and the female residence is in Gallatin.

 

Partners include the Tennessee Alliance of Recovery Residences and National Alliance of Recovery Residences, both of which promote nationally recognized standards for safety and a quality recovery environment.

 


 

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a nonprofit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding in 1966.


2016 Concert Recap for Cumberland Heights

The annual Concert Recap for Cumberland Heights featured Grammy Award-nominated singer-songwriter John Hiatt and his band at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland Heights.

Patrons and other special donors gathered together for a pre-concert celebration at the Downtown Hilton. This is the 50th Anniversary of Cumberland Heights and the 20th Anniversary of this benefit concert. This concert has raised more than $3M over the last 20 years of its existence to assist patients with treatment for alcoholism and addiction.

2016 Concert for Cumberland Heights

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – August 2, 2016 – On Wednesday, October 5, the Concert for Cumberland Heights will feature Grammy Award-nominated singer-songwriter John Hiatt and his band at the historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland Heights. Celebrity friends joining the John Hiatt Trio on this evening will include Richard Thompson, Nate Bargatze and at least one more performer that will be announced in the coming weeks.

Tickets for the concert go on sale Friday, August 5, 2016, via Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com, the Ryman box office, www.ryman.com and by phone 800.745.3000. Tickets are $49.50, $42.50 and $32.50.

The evening’s performance times are:

  • 8-8:30 pm – TBA
  • 8:33-9:10 pm – Richard Thompson
  • 9:10 – 9:30 pm – Nate Bargatze
  • 9:30-10:30 pm – John Hiatt Trio

The Los Angeles Times calls John Hiatt “… one of rock’s most astute singer-songwriters of the last 40 years.” Hiatt is a multi-talented rock guitarist, pianist, singer and songwriter who plays a variety of musical styles including Americana, folk rock, blues and country and has a long relationship with Cumberland Heights and supporting recovery from addiction.

Hiatt is also this year’s winner of the NAATP’s (National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers) Jasper G. Chen See, M.D. Volunteer Leadership Award that recognizes individuals who have provided exceptional volunteer leadership in the area of addiction treatment through board membership and philanthropy.

“This fundraising concert and Cumberland Heights are both near and dear to my heart,” said Hiatt. “I am honored to have such talented friends join me in raising money to help adolescents and young people recover from alcoholism and drug addiction. This is an important cause. Plus, it’s going to be a great show!”

Proceeds of the event support Cumberland Heights’ adolescent and young adult treatment programs. With a treatment plan based in the 12 Steps, these programs help patients set goals for recovery while helping them process life’s consequences and unmanageability. This concert has raised more than $3M over the last 20 years of its existence to assist patients with treatment.

“We are especially grateful to have John Hiatt as our featured performer during this, our 50th Anniversary year and the 20th concert year,” said Cumberland Heights’ CEO Jay Crosson. “This is one of our largest fundraisers of the year and John Hiatt has been instrumental to its success throughout its history. We are grateful to John as well at the other fantastic entertainers and sponsors who make it all possible.”

About Cumberland Heights

Since 1966, Cumberland Heights has been the proven experts in alcohol and drug addiction treatment. They provide quality care, based on the foundations of the 12 Steps, to individuals and their families suffering from addiction. Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. Cumberland Heights is a private, nonprofit organization located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee.

About John Hiatt

John Hiatt has been nominated for several Grammy Awards and has been awarded a variety of other distinctions in the music industry. He remains one of the most respected and influential American singer-songwriters.

Hiatt was working as a songwriter for Tree International, a record label in Nashville, when his song “Sure As I’m Sittin’ Here” was covered by Three Dog Night.[1] The song became a Top 40 hit, earning Hiatt a recording contract with Epic Records. Since then he has released 21 studio albums, two compilation albums and one live album. His songs have been covered by a variety of artists in multiple genres, including Bob Dylan, The Searchers, Delbert McClinton, Willy DeVille, Ry Cooder, Linda Ronstadt, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Joe Bonamassa, Willie Nelson, Three Dog Night, Joan Baez, Paula Abdul, Buddy Guy, the Desert Rose Band, Jimmy Buffett, Mandy Moore, Iggy Pop, Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Rosanne Cash, Suzy Bogguss, Jewel, Aaron Neville, Jeff Healey, Keith Urban, Joe Cocker, Chaka Khan, Paulini and many others. The Dutch singer/songwriter Ilse DeLange recorded the album Dear John with nine of his songs.

About Richard Thompson

Named by Rolling Stone Magazine as one of the Top 20 Guitarists of All Time, Richard Thompson is also one of the world’s most critically acclaimed and prolific songwriters. He has received Lifetime Achievement Awards for Songwriting on both sides of the Atlantic – from the Americana Music Association in Nashville to Britain’s BBC Awards as well as the prestigious Ivor Novello. In 2011, Thompson received an OBE (Order of the British Empire) personally bestowed upon him by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. In the USA Thompson has been nominated at the Americanas for both “Artist of the Year” and “Song of the Year”. HIs recently released CD, Still was produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy which reached #6 in the UK charts (just ahead of Taylor Swift)!

A wide range of musicians have recorded Thompson’s songs including Robert Plant, Elvis Costello, REM, Del McCoury, Bonnie Raitt, Patty Lovelace, Los Lobos, Tom Jones, David Byrne, Don Henley, Robert Earl Keen and many others. Thompson’s massive body of work includes over 40 albums, many Grammy nominations, as well as numerous soundtracks, including Werner Hertzog’s Grizzy Man.

About Nate Bargatze

Nate Bargatze got into the entertainment business naturally — his father is a former clown turned world-class magician. He is now a very popular, critically acclaimed comedian.

Bargatze’s one-hour special, Full Time Magic, was number one on Billboard Top Ten Comedy list. He has appeared multiple times on Conan and Fallon while being one of the first comedians to perform on The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon, and performed on Jimmy Fallon’s Clean Cut Comedy Tour. Bargatze has also performed at Bonnaroo, SXSW, and Moontower and has performed for U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait more than five times.

Named in 2015 in Variety as a “Top 10 Comedian to Watch,” Bargatze was mentioned in Rolling Stone Magazine by Marc Maron as a “comic who should be big” and in Esquire by Jim Gaffigan as “one of the top up and coming comics.” His first album, Yelled At By A Clown, made it to number two on Billboard Top Ten Comedy.

# # #

Media Contact:
Amy A. Atkinson
Amy Atkinson Communications
615.305.8118
Amy@AmyACommunications.com

Recovery is Possible

Recover Life.

Secure Contact: Confidential Email Form

Call Today: 800-646-9998

Stay in the Know

Signup for Emails

Get Confidential Help from Cumberland Heights Treatment Center

FOR A CONFIDENTIAL ADMISSIONS ASSESSMENT

If you or a loved one would like to speak directly with one of our licensed admissions staff, please call us now at (800) 646-9998 or submit the following information. If outside business hours, we will get back to you the following day.

* Required Field

×

Why is it so meaningful to give to Cumberland Heights?

Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

×