NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The alleged leader of a Honduran drug group has been arrested in Nashville.

Officials with Metro Nashville Police said in a Tweet Tuesday morning that Victor Cardoza Martinez was taken into custody at an apartment on Nolensville Pike.

Check out Cumberland Heights’ own Dr. Chapman Sledge discussing the local heroin epidemic and Honduran drug leader’s arrest with News Channel 4.

According to investigators, Martinez is the group’s suspected leader. Police also seized heroin, cocaine and cash in the raid.

February 25, 2016 – A small seed planted over a year ago has grown to fruition with the opening of an outpatient drug rehabilitation facility in Cumberland County. The latest effort to address the rising addiction epidemic is the result of a cooperative effort involving many community agencies and leaders.

 

Cabin in the Woods: Cumberland Heights opens outpatient facility
Cabin in the Woods: Cumberland Heights opens outpatient facility in Crossville, TN
Tuesday an open house was held at Cumberland Good Samaritans (CGS) located off Tenth St. with an overflow crowd gathered to get a first glimpse of “the cabin in the woods” that will serve as Cumberland Heights’ outpatient facility.

 
“There is a big need to address drug and alcohol addiction issues in our community,” CGS Director Mickey Eldridge told the gathering that included persons from law enforcement, social action agencies, citizen volunteer groups and professionals in the field who deal with the issue.

 
“Folks within the community need services and assistances and it became a goal to grow some intervention services,” Eldridge said.

 
CGS board member Steve Stone first brought the need for an outpatient facility to discussion, asking Eldridge what CGS could do to see this happen. He contacted Cumberland Heights whose representatives were receptive to the idea of opening a facility in Crossville.

 
The CGS board then decided to donate use of a cabin it had purchased when it became available and after renovations were done, Cumberland Heights appointed Jerry Baryer to oversee the Cumberland County facility.

 
Cumberland Heights has a long and respected national reputation in the field of alcohol and drug addiction. It was founded by Robert Crichton Sr. and Dr. Thomas Frist Sr. with the mission to “transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol and drug addiction.”

 
That mission incorporates the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous with the therapeutic tools necessary to live productive, sober lives.


Cumberland Heights board members and staff hold commemorative coins to celebrate Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary.
Cumberland Heights board members and staff hold commemorative coins to celebrate Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary.

Drug and alcohol rehabilitation center Cumberland Heights has had a longstanding relationship with the Nashville music industry. However, the non-profit organization has never had a facility on Music Row. That will change in May when Cumberland Heights opens its first Music Row intensive outpatient facility (IOP), to be located at 1619 17th Ave. South.

The IOP treatment program is designed for individuals who have completed or do not require medically-supervised detoxification.

Cumberland Heights also offers a professional musicians track, which combines traditional treatment with specialized components geared toward professional musicians. Musicians learn how the disease effects their profession, and how to surround themselves with a support system for recovery. The Music Row IOP will also be available to work with people who live and work near Music Row. This includes the collegiate recovery community as well as the many business people working downtown who would find this IOP convenient to them in their recovery.

The opening will mean a total of 10 locations available to help communities in Tennessee. Cumberland Heights has IOP facilities in Chattanooga, Cool Springs, Crossville, Hermitage/Old Hickory, Jackson, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Sumner County (Gallatin), in Nashville on River Road and soon Music Row.

PeytonHoge photos-006 copyAdditionally, Cumberland Heights will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year.

“We are honored and proud to have been a trusted provider of alcohol and drug addiction treatment for five decades,” said Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights. “Fifty years of experience brings us so many positive examples of helping patients and their families – we hope to be able to share some of these with the community throughout the year.”

During a celebration party, staff and board members received 50th anniversary commemorative coins modeled after “sober coins” that are used during recovery.

Addiction doesn’t know zip codes, GPAs, or bank account balances.

Teen-Vogue-How-This-Teen-Beat-Alcoholism-at-17


Article: Teen Vogue: How This Teen Beat Alcoholism
Author:
Written: FEB 16, 2016 11:21AM EST

The first week of senior year for most high school students means seeing old friends, figuring out new class schedules, and feeling the excitement of doing every high school thing for the last time. For Regan*, then 17, it meant going to rehab.

 
The night before her parents pulled her out of school to admit her to a 30-day in-patient drug and alcohol treatment program, Regan had run away from home. With nowhere to go, hiding in a bush and covered in poison ivy, she made her way to a local fire station where she called her parents. The next day her life would change forever.

 
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in its fifth edition as of 2013, refers to the disease of alcoholism as Alcohol Use Disorder or AUD. Individuals diagnosed with an AUD are placed along a disease continuum ranging from mild to severe.

 

Regan didn’t smoke crack or carry a gun. She didn’t bounce from school to school or sell drugs. She went to a high school for gifted students and lived in a private, upper-middle-class neighborhood. When she talks about her childhood, she describes it as “ideal” and “perfect.” None of this mattered though. Addiction doesn’t know zip codes, GPAs, or bank account balances.

 

“My mind was killing me. I couldn’t be happy when I was drunk or high. It wasn’t the same as it was those first times,” says Regan, who first started drinking when she was 14.

 

On the night she ran away, Regan had gotten in a fight with her parents. They’d found out about her older boyfriend, read through all the messages on her phone, taken her car keys and her bedroom doorknob. Realizing her attempt to run away wasn’t worth it, that none of it — the drinking, the drugs, the getting in trouble — was worth it, she gave up.

 

“This isn’t how my life is supposed to be. I’m in need of a change, no matter what that is,” Regan remembers thinking. “I couldn’t continue living the way I was. I was going to die.”

 

Tammy Stone, a licensed professional counselor at Cumberland Heights, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center located outside Nashville, Tennessee, works with patients, many under the age of 21, and their families to help them better understand addiction.

 

For many young people, trouble with alcohol and drugs begins with a precipitating event: a parent’s divorce, a break up with a partner, rejection from a dream school, perhaps the death of a loved one.

 

“If they [the patients] don’t have the coping skills or support to work through the event, they might turn to alcohol and drugs to cope,” says Stone. When this happens, the feelings associated with the precipitating event — disappointment, fear, confusion, sadness, anger — are all still there; they never went anywhere.

 

There isn’t always a precipitating event. Regan describes a general feeling of otherness, a feeling like she didn’t quite fit the mold of her peers or like she was missing the life manual everyone else seemed to have.

 

“If you’re experiencing negative consequences in at least three life areas as a result of a particular behavior, like drinking, you have a problem,” she advises. Failing or dropping grades, conflict in peer groups, getting arrested or cited for illegal activity, even losing interest in activities that once brought joy — these events begin to add up to something that looks like more than just the consequences of experimentation.

 

While there are more women in the public spotlight today sharing about their experiences with alcohol and drug abuse (Eva Mendes, Adwoa Aboah, Kelly Osbourne, Kat Von D), there is still a considerable social stigma women face when confronting addiction.

 

“There’s more of a social degradation, so women tend to hide it,” says Stone, adding that for young women, this is compounded by parents who enable, hide, or deny their child’s behavior.

 

“Parents want to protect them from that [the social stigma]. They have a hard time admitting ‘my daughter is an alcoholic,’ so they’ll bail them out of trouble, send them to different colleges, hire lawyers to get them out of legal trouble,” says Stone, “And what that does is send girls a message that, ‘OK, I can’t have this problem. My family is not accepting of me having this problem.'” Shame and denial bury the problem deeper.

 

Alcohol and drug abuse is also linked to sexual assault. A 2015 study conducted by The Washington Post and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation revealed one in five college-aged women have been victims of sexual assault. The report stated, “Most notably, two-thirds of victims say they had been drinking alcohol just before the incidents.”

 

At Cumberland Heights, Stone estimates, conservatively, at least 80% of the female patients have some kind of sexual trauma in their history. “A lot of times, alcoholism doesn’t come to light until they suffer their first sexual assault. That’s if they’ll talk about it.” The shame that so often accompanies a sexual assault then gets tangled up with the shame and denial of addiction. One begins to feed the other and a way out can seem impossible to find.

 

On the way to treatment, Regan remembers thinking she didn’t have a problem with drugs or alcohol, that it was something else altogether. “That’s what I thought treatment was, addressing your problems with drugs and alcohol. But then I realized when I got there that no, those actually aren’t the problems; they’re symptoms.”

 

Just shy of 18, Regan was the oldest in her adolescent program in treatment. Initially, all she could hear was how different she was from everyone else. Over the days and weeks though, she began to realize how similar everyone’s stories were. Regan could replace alcohol for someone else’s heroin or crack, and the feelings were all the same: different, uncomfortable, ashamed, tired, defeated. In treatment, she worked with counselors and case managers to address underlying issues that led to self-medicating with alcohol and drugs.

 

Regan describes struggling early in sobriety with the awkwardness of experiencing life in a sober body: meeting new people, going to events sober, changing old habits and behaviors. The benefits, however, of the sober life quickly outweighed the chaos and instability of the drinking life. No more waking up next to people whose names she couldn’t remember, no more hangovers or blackouts, no more wasting time chasing alcohol and drugs. More than that, sobriety came to mean finding out what she liked to do for fun, uncovering (and appreciating) their authentic selves, and being present for their lives in a way she had never been before.

 

Stone stresses the importance of finding a supportive community, one that understands not only that you don’t drink, but that you can’t drink. That community may look vastly different from what it used to look like before sobriety; in many ways, that’s the point. Many individuals struggle to maintain sobriety when they fall back in with old friends and old habits, ones that don’t support sober living.

 

Through AA, which also has a young people’s program called Young People in Alcoholics Anonymous (icYPAA), and her meditation group, Regan found other people her age trying to do exactly what she was trying to do: stay sober one day at a time.

 

“Young people in recovery care for each other,” Regan explains, “They need each other. They need to see that other people can do it so they can do it.”

 

* Names changed or last names withheld to protect individuals’ anonymity.

 


For six years, Jason Isbell was drunk at every show he played.

During his tenure with beloved Southern rockers Drive-By Truckers, Isbell planned his drinking to keep him on his feet for the duration of the band’s marathon live shows – barely.

Something More Than Free: Jason Isbell's Journey to His Most Popular Album | Grammy Awards 2016, Individual Class“I had it timed where, by the very end of the show, I’d done just about all I could do standing up,” he told NPR in 2013. “I knew I needed two or three before I went on, and then during the show, we’d just pass a bottle around between the band.” The routine totaled about a fifth of Jack Daniels per show.

And Jack and Jason didn’t get along well: “Some people get drunk and become kind of sweet,” Patterson Hood, Drive-By Truckers founder and singer-songwriter, told The New York Times Magazine in 2013. “Jason wasn’t one of those people.” It didn’t help that the younger Isbell, a virtuoso guitarist with a proclivity for fast and fiery licks, was also a stellar songwriter, whose finely wrought and frequently heartbreaking character sketches were obviously on par with those of the older and principal Truckers, Hood and guitarist/singer-songwriter Mike Cooley. Isbell, who also managed to marry and divorce then-Truckers bassist Shonna Tucker during his time with the band, left in 2007. At the time, it was portrayed as amicable; in 2013, Isbell revealed he’d been forced out, mostly because of his drinking.

After his dismissal from DBT, Isbell went off the rails a little bit. He was arrested for public drunkenness and at one point accused Dierks Bentley of plagiarizing one of his songs on Twitter. He knew he needed help, and told his then-girlfriend, fellow musician Amanda Shires, he had to go to rehab. Unfortunately, both times he said it, he was drunk. “I only got to do that twice, I think,” he told NPR. The second time, Shires told him, “You’re telling the wrong person.”

Isbell got the message, and in February 2012, spent two weeks in Cumberland Heights, a rehab center in Nashville. Coming out, he started playing live again, dropped 40 lbs. and started writing the songs that would make up 2013’sSoutheastern. That September, Isbell’s song “Alabama Pines” won song of the year at the Americana Music Awards, kick-starting a wave of critical appreciation that Southeastern built upon when it was released in July 2013. The album contains Isbell’s most-streamed song on Spotify, “Cover Me Up,” and the devastating “Elephant” – coined by one music writer as “the saddest song of the millennium” – a quiet ballad about a cancer patient that concludes, “no one dies with dignity.”

Isbell toured steadily behind Southeastern, backed by a crack band named the 400 Unit – after the psychiatric ward of a hospital near Muscle Shoals, Alabama, where Isbell grew up – that included his now-wife Shires. (“She has a big conscience, a big heart,” he told Rolling Stone in 2013. “Essentially, she’s just a good person.”)

Southeastern was rewarded with a near-sweep at the 2014 Americana Music Awards that saw Isbell take the honors for album, song (“Cover Me Up”) and artist of the year. But none of that weighed on his mind when he returned to the studio for his follow-up, 2015’s Something More Than Free. “I have so many people ask me… ‘Did you feel pressure to follow up Southeastern?” Isbell told Stereogum in 2015. “That same question every damn time! No, that’s not an actual problem to have. I know people who can’t pay their f—ing bills. Following up a successful piece of work with another piece of work is the most ridiculous first-world problem I can think of.”

Sure enough, Something More Than Free was a mature, confident continuation of the work Isbell started with Southeastern. Anchored by the stellar lead single, “24 Frames,” it debuted at No. 1 on Billboard‘s Top Rock, Top Country Albums and Top Folk Albums charts, and No. 5 on the Billboard200. By way of comparison, Southeastern peaked at No. 23 on the Billboard200.

NASHVILLE, TENN. – (November 12, 2015) – Cumberland Heights drug and alcohol rehabilitation center has launched a new advertising campaign with the theme of “Recover Life.”

The first part of the campaign features staff living lives in recovery. In the ad, the staff members hold up a Cumberland Heights sober coin while saying how many years they have been in recovery. Sober coins are common symbols of years living in recovery.

Helping someone recover their life from the grips of addiction is the most important benefit we provide our patients – and their families,” said Martha Farabee, chief development and marketing officer. “We wanted the campaign to reflect our success and our expertise in helping people live a life free from drugs and alcohol. With many of our staff members living successfully in recovery, they are role models for patients and able to build trust that is crucial for the recovery process.”

Farabee said the integrated marketing campaign targets primarily the families of those struggling with addiction, as well as targeting the patient.

“Cumberland Heights includes patients’ families in the process because success depends on a strong support system once they leave our facilities,” said Farabee.

Future ads in this campaign will feature alumni and alumni families. The Cumberland Heights alumni association has more than 10,000 members in the Nashville area.

We’re proud to have served Nashville for nearly 50 years,” said Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights. “Having been a trusted member of the community for so long, our best source of referrals is from our many alumni – or friends and family of our alumni. Next year will be Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary and this new campaign is the beginning of that recognition.”

One of the campaign’s consistent visuals is a coin noting the 50th anniversary. This coin is modeled after the concept of sober coins.

The ads will placed on television, billboards, radio, in print and on various digital channels in middle Tennessee.

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a non-profit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding.


RECOVER LIFE TELEVISION ADS




RECOVER LIFE PRINT ADS

Jamie J.
I recovered life 7 years ago.

Porter A.
I recovered life 3 years ago.

cumberland-heights-nashville-treatment-revover-life-ads-jaime cumberland-heights-nashville-treatment-revover-life-ads-porter

Montgomery Gentry and Special Guest Aaron Lewis Perform
to Benefit Cumberland Heights

Popular Fundraising Concert Scheduled at Historic Ryman Auditorium

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – August 26, 2015 – On Wednesday, October 21, the Concert for Cumberland Heights will feature country music stars Montgomery Gentry with special guest Aaron Lewis at the historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland Heights.

“Alcohol and drug addiction affects our entire community,” said Troy Gentry. “We are excited to help Cumberland Heights support young people suffering from this disease.”

On Wednesday, October 21, the Concert for Cumberland Heights will feature country music stars Montgomery Gentry with special guest Aaron Lewis at the historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland HeightsProceeds of the event support Cumberland Heights’ adolescent and young adult treatment programs. With a treatment plan based in the 12 Steps, these programs help patients set goals for recovery while helping them process life’s consequences and unmanageability.

“We look forward to this concert every year,” said Cumberland Heights’ CEO Jay Crosson. “The money raised is so important to us in supporting our mission – plus, it’s fun for everyone involved. We are grateful to the artists and sponsors who make it all possible.”

Tickets for the concert are on sale now via Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com, the Ryman box office, ryman.com and by phone 800.745.3000. Tickets are $49.50, $42.50 and $32.50.

Since 1966, Cumberland Heights has been the proven experts in alcohol and drug addiction treatment. They provide quality care, based on the foundations of the 12 Steps, to individuals and their families suffering from addiction. Cumberland Heights is a private, nonprofit organization located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee.

About Montgomery Gentry

With over 20 plus charted singles, the Kentucky-born duo just celebrated a major career milestone as Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry were recently inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame. On June 9, the pair released Folks Like Us, their eighth studio album and first with label partner Blaster Records.

Montgomery Gentry has earned countless CMA, ACM, and GRAMMY awards and nominations with undeniable blue collar anthems like “Hell Yeah,” “My Town,” and “Hillbilly Shoes.” They’ve notched five #1 singles (“If You Ever Stop Loving Me,” “Something To Be Proud Of,” “Lucky Man,” “Back When I Knew It All” and “Roll With Me”) and will soon celebrate their sixth anniversary as Grand Ole Opry members. For more about Montgomery Gentry, visit www.montgomerygentry.com, engage with Troy and Eddie on Facebook, @mgunderground on twitter, and check out their YouTube channel.

About Aaron Lewis

Aaron Lewis has often been called one of the most versatile artists around. He has written and played everything from metal to traditional country. He was the lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist, and founding member of the rock group Staind. After seven albums he ventured into country music with his debut solo EP, Town Line, which included his first single, “Country Boy.” He followed it up with the LP, The Road, with “Endless Summer” which also made the country charts.

Media Contacts:
Merrill Derrick Amy A. Atkinson
Marketing and Public Relations Manager Amy Atkinson Communications
615.432.3226 615.305.8118
merrill_derrick@cumberlandheights.org Amy@AmyACommunications.com

Cumberland Heights Promotes Jay Crosson to Chief Executive OfficerCumberland Heights has promoted Jay Crosson to chief executive officer. Crosson served as interim chief executive officer since November 2014 in addition to his duties as chief financial officer.

“It was important to Cumberland Heights’ patients, alumni and supporters that we conduct a national search for the best new chief executive officer,” said Jay Perkins, chairman on the board of directors. “After six months of interviewing top candidates, I am pleased to say that we found the ideal person in Jay who understands the organization inside and out and is prepared to lead Cumberland Heights to the next level.”

Crosson joined Cumberland Heights in 1993 as an admissions associate. In 2011, he was promoted to chief financial officer. He also served as admissions and accounts receivable manager and director of admissions and accounts receivable.

“I’m honored and humbled to serve as Cumberland Heights’ next CEO,” said Crosson. “It impossible for me to say how much Cumberland Heights has positively impacted my life personally and professionally.”

In addition to his work at Cumberland Heights, Crosson was a patient in 1989.

“I’m just one example of how Cumberland Heights and our amazing staff have helped thousands recover from drug and alcohol addiction over the last 50 years,” said Crosson.

Crosson earned his masters in business administration from Belmont University and his undergraduate degree from Middle Tennessee State University. He is a native Nashvillian.

Cumberland Heights will be  participating in the  following conferences during the summer of 2015


May

May 15 – 17

The 4th AnnuaSoutheastern CRC Summitl Southeastern CRC Summit at the University of Mississippi in Oxford
Please join other Collegiate Recovery Community professionals and students from across the Southeast for panels, presentations, and fellowship as we continue to build communities and programs that support academic success and strengthen recovery. Cumberland Heights will be hosting this event.

More Information

May 16 – 18
NAATP AnnualNational Association of Addiction Providers (NAATP) Annual Leadership Conference  
This year’s conference will feature leading speakers in the addiction treatment field, with a focus on spirituality, public policy and leadership topics to help treatment leaders improve their quality of care and success of their business. Cumberland Heights will be a sponsor and exhibiting at this event.  

More Information

 

 

May 27 – 29
BCHC_cGe_reasonably_small6th National Collegiate Recovery Conference
The Association of Recovery in Higher Education’s 6th National Collegiate Recovery Conference is designed to facilitate a greater understanding about Collegiate Recovery Communities and Programs and their essential role in colleges and universities across the nation.   Cumberland Heights will be exhibiting at this event.

More Information

 


June

June 6 – 10
ama-logoAmerican Medical Association (AMA) Conference
Cumberland Heights will be attending this event.

More Information

 

June 22 – 24

iibh-2015-sidebarInnovations in Behavioral Healthcare
Innovations in Behavioral Healthcare is a new conference at the intersection of the treatment industry, the medical field and business management. With an emphasis on physical health, mental health and the health of your business, Innovations in Behavioral Healthcare provides ethics training, effective methods for treating substance abuse, best practices for treating mental health conditions, approaches for timely interventions, insights into revenue management and more. Cumberland Heights will be a sponsor and exhibiting at this event.

More Information


July

July 19 – 24
adbookNational Labor Assistance Program (LAP) Conference
Cumberland Heights will be exhibiting and attending this event.

More Information



July 20 – 23
COREthumbnailC.O.R.E. Clinical Overview of the Recovery Experience
The C.O.R.E. conference is one of the premier addiction and recovery conferences hosted by C4   Recovery Solutions for addiction professionals to advance their understanding of the principles behind abstinence-based recovery practices. The conference is structured as a forum to increase the collective understanding of the addiction recovery processes. The goal is to improve addiction treatment outcomes by better integrating abstinence-based practices and Twelve-Step principles into therapeutic initiatives. Cumberland Heights is a founding patron, will be exhibiting and attending this event.

More Information

 

July 21 – 23
logoMississippi Association of Addiction Professionals Annual Conference
Together, we are “Bringing all the Pieces Together” to help enhance the quality of life for those directly or indirectly affected by alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse. MAAP’s mission is three-fold: “To provide education, training and certification to professionals in the field of chemical dependency.” Cumberland Heights will be attending this event.

More Information

Dr. Chapman Sledge, the medical director at Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center in Nashville, said he notices the increase every year around this time. He said it’s spurred by all the social pressure to drink around events like the Super Bowl, but that often it’s a problem that has started much earlier than that. Read more…

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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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