Original Article: Green Hills News, Staff Writer, David Smith – February 22, 2017

Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
A retired bus operator let it be know that upon his death he wanted to donate his home.

But Timothy Cotton, a retired bus operator who drove for major country music stars Tim McGraw, Conway Twitty, Alan Jackson, Kathy Mattea and the country music group Lonestar, also had a more pointed message: he wanted the success he achieved in life to be a tool for people needing help.

The home at Setliff Place in East Nashville sold this January generating $285,000, all of which was donated to Cumberland Heights, an addiction treatment center.

“This home holds a special place in our heart,” said Mallory Gibson, who, along with her husband, purchased the home. “Our family also lives on Setliff Place and we will now be able to raise our children within walking distance of each other. Tim was deeply committed to his family and his community, and we look forward to honoring that legacy in this beautiful home.”

Following the transaction, Cumberland Heights announced the creation of the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance. The fund is part of Cumberland Heights’ endowment and will provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford treatment or do not have insurance to cover costs.

Cotton was himself a patient on a MusiCares scholarship.

“Tim Cotton was a generous soul who loved caring for others,” said Jay Crosson, chief executive officer at Cumberland Heights. “His incredible donation and the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance will help many, many people recover their life from drug and alcohol addiction. Tim’s memory will live on at Cumberland Heights in perpetuity.”

Cotton was renowned for his ability to make friends. He touched so many people in the Nashville recovery community that they organized aftercare meetings in his hospital room so he did not have to miss meetings.

After his death, Cotton’s sister Cathy Reisch, received numerous calls from former Cumberland Heights’ patients who had met Tim Cotton during treatment and were touched enough to call with condolences.

“The Cotton family is grateful to Bill Branch and Life Style Real Estate Advisors. Bill did more than donate his commission – he put his heart into this task, was very supportive to our entire family and dedicated a lot of time to make this sale happen for all the parties involved,” said Reisch.

Bill Branch of Life Style Real Estate Advisors served as broker and donated his commission because proceeds were being donated to Cumberland Heights.

Branch describes the experience as follows: “Tim Cotton loved his family, his home, and his neighborhood.”

Having worked with Cumberland Heights on several other real estate transactions to support their mission, it was immediately apparent to me that this was a very special situation. After meeting Tim’s sister Cathy Reisch for the first time, I wanted to be a part of helping to make Tim’s dreams and wishes for his home come true. We had two goals from the start: to raise as much money for Tim’s endowment to Cumberland Heights as possible through the sale of his home, and do as much as possible to find new stewards for the property that would love the home and the neighborhood as much as Tim did. On both counts, we succeeded beyond our hopes, and there will be many people benefiting from Tim’s beautiful heart and enormous generosity for years to come.”

Cotton was the 1991 Honoree for the Mary Catherine Strobel Award as Volunteer of the Year from Nashville CARES and trained HIV/AIDS volunteer.

By: Mary Beth McCauley, Staff Writer at University of Tennessee Daily Beacon Feb 9, 2017 — Updated Feb 13, 2017

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour

Knoxville (Tennessee) had the chance to get up close and personal with Justin Furstenfeld, the lead vocalist of alternative rock group Blue October, at the Square Room in Market Square this past Wednesday.

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld's unique approach to his book tour
People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour and his story of recovery

Furstenfeld has been traveling to cities across the country to promote his book, “Crazy Making: The Words and Lyrics of Justin Furstenfeld to the Music of Blue October.” The “Open Book Tour” also gives Furstenfeld the opportunity to share stories regarding his struggle with addiction, depression and relationships along with playing an acoustic set in front of a small, intimate audience.

He kicked off the evening with “The Answer,” the title track of Blue October’s first album, and began to tell the audience about his own personal journey, starting with his teenage years. Furstenfeld led his first band called The Last Wish at only 15 years old, the age that he was officially diagnosed with depression. When the Last Wish split up, Furstenfeld went on to create Blue October.

Although Furstenfeld was raw and honest with the crowd, he told his stories with such charisma and humor that throughout the heartfelt details we were all laughing and smiling. He often reminded the crowd, “This is the open book tour. No holding back.” The auditorium felt like a room full of friends, a safe space to share their darkest secrets.

Furstenfeld played a few other songs from Blue October’s debut album, such as “Black Orchid” and “Breakfast After 10.” In these, the audience learned of his first love, Mamie, and how he forgot her birthday after two years of dating. His belated birthday song to her was “Calling You,” the song that scored Blue October a record deal.

He told the audience about his band’s first 15-passenger tour van — and their second one, and their third. He walked us down the path that began his drug addiction, partying on tour every night in hotel rooms and bars. During this same time, Furstenfeld met his first wife and had his first child, a baby girl named Blue, and that changed everything for him. The audience sat quietly absorbing every detail and feeling every emotion as he told his story.

He bravely shared the details of his divorce, the custody battle for his daughter and his spiral back into addiction. And, through all of these hardships, he continued to make music.

Furstenfeld pieced together all of the major events in his life one by one and sang us the songs that stemmed from those events, making them even more meaningful and emotional for the audience, many of which were already huge fans of Blue October.

Towards the end of the evening, Furstenfeld shared his redemption story. He went through a 75-day program at Cumberland Heights, a rehabilitation center in Nashville, and found his faith there. He has been sober for four years now. The audience cried, clapped and cheered for him, all rising to their feet in applause. Furstenfeld truly was an open book, and told his story bravely without shame, but with hope.

After the show, Furstenfeld took time to meet his fans, shaking hands and signing posters, all with a smile on his face. His merchandise sports the phrase “People Can Change,” the perfect summary of his journey thus far.

CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS TO OPEN
SECOND SOBER-LIVING HOME IN FOUR MONTHS

NASHVILLE, TENN. – Jan. 10, 2017 – Cumberland Heights will open a sober-living home for adult men this month, its second sober-living home opened in the last four months.

By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.
By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.

The Keep It Simple! House opens on January 16, will serve up to eight male clients at a time. Clients will stay a minimum of three months and must have completed a primary treatment program. Keep It Simple! joins Searchlight Sober Living for women opened in late October 2016.

 

Cumberland Heights sober living creates the right environment during the critical initial two-year period of recovery,” said Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson. “By adding sober living to residential inpatient, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs called Still Waters, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.”

 

Sober living allows residents to maintain contact with outpatient services and aftercare while integrating school, work and community responsibilities.

 

While other recovery residences exist, there has been a gap between the very high end providing many services resembling treatment and the very low end which is affordable but offers no services and often has high turnover,” said Executive Director for Community-Based Services Randal Lea. “Cumberland has secured safe housing at affordable rates in established neighborhoods.”

 

Cumberland Heights’ sober homes operate on a “social model” where residents share responsibility and accountability, which fosters greater independence from treatment or authority figures. The male residence is in Murfreesboro and the female residence is in Gallatin.

 

Partners include the Tennessee Alliance of Recovery Residences and National Alliance of Recovery Residences, both of which promote nationally recognized standards for safety and a quality recovery environment.

 


 

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a nonprofit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding in 1966.


On Thursday, 4/17 We will have a Maundy Thursday Service at 6:00pm in the small chapel at the RR Campus. This is open for patients, staff and alumni.

The Maundy Thursday service remembers the last evening Jesus spent with his disciples. He washed their feet as a sign of service/humility and offered the words that we use in our communion services. Maundy stands for “mandatum” and signifies the commandments that Jesus left with the disciples to “Love one another”

Rev. Carrie Fraser, MDIV, LMFT, CADC Director of Pastoral Care Services
8283 River Road, Nashville, TN 37209

MaundyThursday3

Read NFocus Article

At the Reaching New Heights Women’s Luncheon for Cumberland Heights, guests can always expect an atmosphere of acceptance and camaraderie, and this year’s event was certainly no exception. Despite a full house at Hillwood Country Club, the women’s gathering-which did include a few gentlemen, sequestered to one long table at the far side of the room-felt like an intimate family affair, with Cumberland Heights’ success stories serving as the centerpiece of the poignant afternoon.

News anchor Cynthia Williams, emcee of the luncheon and a Cumberland Heights graduate, offered a humorous and heartfelt take on her time in rehab and the road to recovery. The Sheila Keeble Award was presented by Sheila’s son, Patrick-also a graduate of Cumberland Heights-to Leslie Dabrowiak, yet another alum of the program. Leslie was celebrated for her 25+ years of service and leadership to Cumberland Heights and her tireless efforts to aid in fundraising through events like the Women’s Luncheon and the annual Concert for Cumberland Heights. “Thank you, Patrick, for making me sound so good,” Leslie joked before acknowledging that she was “truly overwhelmed” by the honor.

The keynote speaker, Susan Ford Bales, daughter of President Gerald Ford and Mrs. Betty Ford, shared her powerful and personal story about being the daughter of an addict. Emotions were running high as she recounted the heart-wrenching journey of her mother’s descent into alcohol and drug dependency, and her road to treatment and recovery. Approximately one in four Americans are exposed to alcoholism in the family, with so many more impacted by the disease through friendships and professional relationships, so it was no surprise to see how moved the crowd was by Susan’s inspiring testimony. And it was yet another timely and stirring reminder of how crucial treatment facilities like Cumberland Heights are to our community.

Addictionpro.com

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), marijuana use by adolescents declined from the late 1990s until the mid-to-late 2000s but has steadily increased since then. Chapman Sledge, MD, chief medical officer at Cumberland Heights, finds that…    More…

In recent months, there has been a growing conversation about marijuana use. Should it be legalized for recreational use or is it a “gateway” drug to more addictive substances? A recent CNN story… More

 

Dr. Chapman Sledge, Medical Director at CH will be participating in the NAATP Regional Education Event this Friday in Atlanta.

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WKRN News 2

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Addiction recovery center Cumberland Heights is seeing more heroin addicts than ever before.

“Today I see more heroin addicts in the course of week than I had in my entire career, until about five years ago. It’s so prevalent, it is so common and these are not people that you would ever dream are addicted to heroin. The stereotype of heroin is long gone,” Chapman Sledge, Chief Medical Officer at Cumberland Heights explains to Nashville’s News 2.

There are three reasons Sledge hears consistently from patients for their addiction.

“Number one it’s easier to get. Number two, it’s cheaper and number three, it’s stronger than the prescription opiates that are available these days.”

The white-powder opioid is highly addictive whether you smoke it, snort it or shoot it. The addiction often starts with pain pills.

“It doesn’t start out as an expensive habit, it’s relatively cheap. The problem is that you begin to build a tolerance so what starts as a cheap habit, becomes expensive quickly. I started off snorting it and gradually, as I built a tolerance, I moved to intravenous because I heard you could get more bang for your buck that way,” former heroin addict Billy explained.

Billy says the good news is that there is help; there is a way to recover before another life is lost.

“My life has significantly improved. I went from being a heroin addict who had nothing to live for to a respected member in society. I am currently enrolled in school, I own my own home, I got married this past October and where I came from to where I am today is absolutely as a result of my recovery from my addiction.”

WKRN News 2
 

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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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