Tag Archives: addiction recovery

Tag Archives: addiction recovery


Sunday Sermon: Advent: A Season for Anticipating Change

December 1, 2019

Sunday Sermon Advent A Season for Anticipating Change
Advent Candles – Three Purple And One Pink as a Symbol of Faith with Bokeh Lights
On this first Sunday of the Christian season of Advent, we discuss the spiritual concept of hope, and talk about the hope that comes from inviting God/Higher Power into our lives. As God turned the world upside down with the birth of a baby on Christmas, our Higher Power has the ability to turn us inside out in our recovery, turning our despair into hope, our grief into joy, and our suffering into service.


Cumberland Heights Gratitude Meeting on Thanksgiving DayPlease join us on Thanksgiving Day and share your attitude of gratitude with patients and Alumni! Immediately following the gratitude meeting, we invite everyone to join us for Thanksgiving Dinner in the Craig Dining Hall! Cost for the meal will be $12/person however you MUST register below!

Event Details:

WHAT: Gratitude Meeting on Thanksgiving Day
WHEN: Thursday, November 28, 2019 from 10:00AM – 11:00AM
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center – Auditorium (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
Open to the public, alumni and Cumberland Heights Employees

  • Personal Information

    This event is come one, come all but RSVP is requested so we have a head count. Please provide your full name, email, cell phone number and number of participants below.

Grand Rounds Presentation: Couples and Addiction – Where do we go from here?

Grand Rounds Presentation: Couples and Addiction – Where do we go from here?

Event Details:

WHO: Kristy Roll, LCSW
WHAT: Grand Rounds Presentation: Couples and Addiction – Where do we go from here?
WHEN: Wednesday, November 13, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center – Room 114/115 (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
COST: $15 – Open to the public, FREE for CH Employees!
CONTACT HOURS: 3

REGISTER NOW

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the issues that couples face when addiction is present
  2. Participants will be informed on research regarding couples
  3. Participants will be able to take away tools from several theoretical models to use when working with couples in residential treatment
  4. Participants will begin to understand ways to shift old shame based language to more positive/recovery supporting language

About the Presenter:

Kristy Roll is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with 16 years experience in the addiction and mental health field. Kristy utilizes a multi-dimensional approach with families focusing on improving communication, decreasing conflict and increasing education about addiction. She is experienced in working with co-occurring adolescents and adults and skilled in supporting family members and those suffering from addiction.

The G.R.A.T.E EventCome out and celebrate the reason for the season! We’ll have a Fireside Meeting & Gratitude Lantern Lighting, Jam Session (bring your guitar), Marshmallow Roast with Hot Cocoa and lots of fun for our alumni, their families & kids!

G.RATITUDE
R.ECOVERY
A.PPRECIATION
T.HANKFULNESS
E.NGAGEMENT

WHO: All Alumni & Friends
WHAT: The G.R.A.T.E Event
WHEN: Saturday November 9, 2019 4:00-8:00PM
WHERE: Alumni Pavilion River Road Campus

  • Personal Information

    This event is come one, come all but RSVP is requested so we have a head count. Please provide your full name, email, cell phone number and number of participants below.

Sunday Sermon: The Promise of Freedom, Part 3

Sunday Sermon: The Promise of Freedom, Part 3

October 20, 2019

The Promise of Freedom, Part 3: Once we take the first step in recovery, admitting our powerlessness over our addiction and the unmanageability of our lives, we ask for help and become free from the substance. What remains are the deeper conditions of our disease: resentments, fears, shame, and character defects. This third message on freedom takes a look at how the process of recovery, notably in steps 4-7, we gain freedom from these deeper issues that keep us bound to addiction.


Sunday Sermon: The Promise of Freedom, Part 1

October 6, 2019

The AA Big Book promises a life in recovery that is “happy, joyous, and free,” but free from what? This message is the first in a series that explore the depth of freedom gained through the 12-step recovery process and spiritual awakening. This week’s message focused on freedom from substances, freedom from obsession, and freedom from the illusion of control.


Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Life actually has meaning to me now

Todd M Podcast – Sobriety doesn’t make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Imagine your drug-addicted lifestyle being broadcast on national television. It happened to Todd M. on the popular A&E show “Intervention.” The season 16 episode followed Todd as he smoked meth and downed pills in his parent’s barn. The experience led him to Cumberland Heights where he now works with three years of sobriety under his belt. Hear how he felt watching that episode for the first time, and why the Californian decided to stick around Tennessee.

Tips on staying sober on vacation

When you’re in recovery most things are bound to look and feel very different, especially when you’re away from home. Let’s face it, recovery changes everything!

If you’re wondering how to approach your next vacation without alcohol or other substances, we have some tips to help you stay sober on your next journey.

Start by picking the perfect destination. 

If you’re traveling during spring break you may want to avoid the more notorious party places. Today there are many vacation packages that cater to those wishing to stay sober while having a fabulous getaway. Likewise, many cities have alcohol free party venues and more and more concerts designate an alcohol free zone in which to enjoy the festivities. In other words, pick a place whose reputation doesn’t necessarily revolve around its bar scene!

Remember that your basic needs haven’t changed. 

If anything, it’s even more important to try and stick to a regular schedule as much as possible in order to maintain a sense of balance.

This includes trying to get a good night’s sleep, for as many hours as you usually do back at home. Don’t forget to eat as regularly and as healthy as you can while being tempted by vacation treats and snacks! If you exercise, stick to your routine and be sure to take as many time-outs as you need in order to stay centered and feeling in control.

Staying sober doesn’t mean spending every single minute focused on that thought. Sometimes it helps to plan ahead so that you have something to look forward to. For example, you can shift your attention to day-planning, scheduling events in advance and also carving out room for spontaneous fun.

Remember that maintaining a sense of structure doesn’t have to come at the expense of spur of the moment fun– don’t get bogged down thinking about what you can’t do! Vacation is time for adventure and trying new things. Why not plan to cross some things off your bucket list, or try something out of your comfort zone—bungee jumping, rock climbing or a scenic helicopter trip all come to mind!

Keep your triggers and stress buttons in mind. 

Mental preparation is every bit as important as the logistical preparations you so carefully make.

For example, flights get delayed, luggage gets lost and inevitably your travel companions bring their own sets of dramas. If you are with a group keep in mind that everyone has different routines, travel rules and conceptions of what having fun means! So by all means, don’t forget to pack plenty of patience along with your earbuds, a pillow and a few munchies!

In other words, expect things to take a side trip (pun intended) from the norm, and be prepared for last-minute changes.

If you’re traveling with a group, communicate your needs and goals. Talk to your friends or family about the importance of your sobriety and share what they can do to support you. Many people find it helpful to talk about potential triggers and to set expectations before you leave home.

Likewise, don’t leave behind all of the helpful tools that you rely on at home. Make sure any recovery apps you use on a regular basis are on your phone and download recovery readings ahead of time. If there’s a playlist that influences your sobriety, make sure to have it handy.

Just because you’re away from home doesn’t mean you can’t or shouldn’t stay connected to your network of support. Call or text the people who motivate your sobriety and don’t forget to call into any online support groups you belong to.

Being away from home will bring its own set of unique challenges

There will still be obstacles, struggles and stress, and it’s very possible that being away from familiar territory will make sobriety harder, not easier.

Because of this, you may want to wait to plan a vacation bash until after you’ve maintained a certain length of time in recovery. While not a hard and fast rule, it is a consideration that many experts recommend you think about prior to making big, complicated or lengthy plans.

Whenever you decide to travel, and wherever you decide to enjoy your next adventure, by all means, don’t spend your entire trip focused on what you can’t do. Yes, the truth is that when you’re in recovery you are missing out on something—an unmanageable addiction that was adversely affecting your life and the lives of your loved ones. Now, instead of carrying that burden, you can wake up every morning feeling healthy and knowing that you’re giving yourself, the world, and your loved ones the very best you’ve got to give.

There’s no doubt that seeing someone downing a beer or sipping cocktails can be a one-way ticket to a pity party. Instead, choose to focus on the positives, like the brand new opportunities that sobriety brings into your life. Being in recovery is a grand adventure in and of itself. There are new things to discover and new people to meet.

Take that vacation, you’ve earned it! And when you do, remember that with just a little planning and a lot of patience you’ll be good to go—literally!

Recovery is possible—recover your unique, purposeful, sober life by reaching out to the dedicated experts at Cumberland Heights.

Addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. For over 50 years we have carefully provided the highest quality of care for adults, adolescents and families who suffer from, or are affected by this devastating disease.

Our nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center is located on a peaceful, pastoral 177-acre campus on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. We provide a continuum of services through two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes.

At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of family participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

Steps to prevent a relapse

Relapse happens. Like some other unwanted things in life we’d rather avoid, relapse is a very real possibility for people in recovery. Relapse from addiction to alcohol or drugs occurs for several reasons. Meeting up with friends who misuse substances can trigger the urge to use. A sudden memory has the power to unleash the desire for alcohol or drugs. And sometimes stress that feels overwhelming can trigger the belief that there is no other, or better, way to relieve the pressure, anxiety or tension.

Of course, all of these thoughts can be countered and the tools learned in treatment can be used to push back on unwanted thoughts or feelings in order to prevent relapse.

Experts Recommend Several Skills to Prevent Relapse

Perhaps the best method to use to prevent relapse is the consistent practice of healthy coping skills learned in treatment. Avoiding risk factors for use, and building and using a support system are other key elements.

For example, cutting back on support group meetings or counseling sessions can be a detriment to recovery. Emotional challenges are part of everyday life, and studies show that a recovering brain is susceptible to anxiety and depression. But without a social support system, alcohol or drug use can look like an easy means of “fixing” problems and feeling better.

Keep in mind that if you stop using appropriate coping behaviors and begin to think that drinking or drug use can be controlled, the risk of relapse increases.

Creating a relapse prevention plan is an excellent prevention strategy. The best relapse prevention plan is simple and realistic and easily accessed. You can work out such a plan with your counselor and it can be as detailed or straightforward as you like.

Hope For The Best, Plan For Challenges

A relapse prevention plan includes the resources you can use if you feel as though you may relapse. With this in mind, be sure that your plan includes someone to call for support, hotline or crisis line numbers, a safe place to go, a schedule of support group meetings in your area and a list of personal reasons for staying sober.

Recovery is possible—recover your unique, purposeful, sober life by reaching out to the dedicated experts at Cumberland Heights.

Addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. For over 50 years we have carefully provided the highest quality of care for adults, adolescents and families who suffer from, or are affected by this devastating disease.

Our nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center is located on a peaceful, pastoral 177-acre campus on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. We provide a continuum of services through two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes.

At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of family participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.


Recovery is Possible

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