Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment

Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment


Finding gratitude and faith in recovery

When we’re battling addiction, it can feel as though we’ve lost sight of what truly matters in our lives. We become focused on seeking out substances, thereby missing the opportunity to grow in our personal and spiritual journey to wellness; in this downfall, we may lose aspects of ourselves that once meant so much to us – such as our health, relationships, career path, hobbies and more. Before we know it, we may find ourselves battling unhealthy emotions like guilt, isolation, anger and resentment – and if we continue spiraling down this path, we may go on to experience even more hardship and destruction in our lives.

Recovery is incredibly difficult for this exact reason – with so much to overcome, we must push ourselves harder than ever before to find the light amidst the darkness. By adopting crucial positive emotions while healing – gratitude, acceptance and faith – we are much more likely to carry out recovery in beautiful ways we never thought were possible.

Why Perception is So Important

A few years ago, Forbes Magazine likened perception to a mathematical equation that becomes complex;

“This infinite mathematical equation continues throughout our lives and it is too awesome for the human mind to calculate. Exponentially it builds a calculation that is way beyond our capabilities to imagine. No wonder our perceptions are unique to only us.”

As human beings, it’s completely natural for us to focus more on what’s going wrong rather than what’s going right. If you’ve ever taken an inventory of how your day went before you went to bed, it’s suddenly easier to remember the small moments of disappointment or frustration rather than to recall the singing birds outside the window, the gentle rain that was so relaxing or the kind word that was said by a friend or loved one. Why is this?

The Huffington Post explains that used to be an effective mode for survival – if we were able to perceive problems, we were more likely to survive – but nowadays, it only perpetuates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety. So how can we combat this natural tendency to look at everything negatively?

Use These Tools

There are several small steps we can take each day to increase positive thoughts and emotions; we just have to make the time to do them:

  • Relish in the moments that bring us joy – When something happens that makes us smile, we can tune into all of our senses to really enjoy the present moment. By basking in this beautiful instance, we’re appreciating the good that’s just come into our lives – which ultimately leaves us in a happier state of mind.
  • Maintain a gratitude journal – It may sound silly but writing down the things we’re grateful for each day can help us remain satisfied in our daily lives. Sometimes we forget the small, precious moments that have added beauty to our day – and a gratitude journal will ensure that we don’t forget them.
  • Take a break from the news – journalists often report gore and tragic events because that’s what draws attention; but for many people, the news only adds negativity. Take a break from watching the news, and instead fuel up with some positive things – such as uplifting music.
  • Use critical thinking with your judgments – the next time you find yourself judging a situation negatively, utilize your critical thinking and assess – is that completely accurate? Could there have been another meaning that could be derived from the situation? By challenging yourself, you’re helping change those habits in the mind that perpetuate a state of pessimism.

Using 12-Step Programs to Foster Mental, Physical and Spiritual Wellness

There are many beautiful areas of recovery that also foster this type of growth. Mindfulness and meditation, for example, are evidence-based, holistic practices that teach individuals how to focus more on the present moment. In doing this, the chaotic thought processes that typically occur are gently guided to more positive, simplistic ways of being – and this is the start of a beautiful journey to recovery for many.

12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA), also encourage positive thinking by helping individuals work through what has previously held them back. No matter what we’ve gone through in the past, we can’t fully heal until we’ve worked diligently in recovery – and 12-Step programs provide a safe space for people to do this alongside others in similar situations. In fact, the following are what you can find amongst the 12-Steps:

  1. Honesty
  2. Faith
  3. Surrender
  4. Soul Searching
  5. Integrity
  6. Acceptance
  7. Humility
  8. Willingness
  9. Forgiveness
  10. Maintenance
  11. Making Contact
  12. Service

It is through these steps that many people find a more enriching life, with healthy connections to others and tools to help them navigate challenging situations. Rather than feeling lost and abandoned, those in recovery can share and learn from others in a setting that promotes healing and growth. Sponsors further support individuals by guiding them through some of life’s greatest challenges, and perceptions become shaped more towards a life of healing as time goes on.

Begin Your Journey Today

Even if it feels scary to take the leap forward, recovery is a positive change that can enhance a person’s life in ways they never thought imaginable. Don’t wait and allow those negative thoughts to take over your life any longer – make a pact to start the journey to increased happiness, gratitude and faith today by speaking with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Your personal recovery journey is like a finger print. While many of them look and feel the same, unique experiences make our stories one of a kind. They can inspire, heal, create hope or even push someone to take that first step in their own journey.

Liz sits down with our Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime's greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It's a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

That’s what Cumberland Heights’ new podcast “Recovery Live” is all about. Liz Stanislawski, Marketing and Public Relations Manager and former WSMV journalist will be interviewing alumni, staff, family members, counselors – really anyone who has been touched by addiction. The podcast is co-produced by Jaime Gibbons, Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator. She is the very first guest, talking about what 16 years of sobriety looks like.

Travis Meadows

Cumberland Heights also welcomed Travis Meadows on the show. The successful singer/songwriter is known for penning hits for several country music stars including Wynonna Judd, Jake Owen, Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Hank Williams Jr. He also has several albums of his own like “Killing Uncle Buzzy” which was inspired by journal entries he wrote while he was in treatment at Cumberland Heights.

Future guests include a meth addict whose story was broadcast to millions on the A&E reality show, “Intervention”, a teen who grew up in the recovery world and ended up becoming addicted himself and a woman who as a young teen had to take care of her siblings when her mom disappeared for days.

These stories don’t sugarcoat. They are real, raw and honest. From teenagers with just a couple years of sobriety, to those who haven’t picked up a drink or drug in 30 plus years.

We are so excited to share this new project with you and hope you’ll gain as much from listening as we have putting it together.

Click here to listen!

Cumberland Heights Opioid Epidemic Flyer

Navigating Through the Ethical Swamp: Do You Have the Tools?

 

WHO: Open to the public
WHERE: FLC Room 114/115 – Cumberland Heights River Road Campus
WHEN: July 19, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM

With the opioid epidemic, the increasing complexity of healthcare and reimbursement, medication supported recovery, the demand for standardized assessments and evidence based treatments, measurable outcomes, and the move toward integration into primary care, the addiction treatment field has never had more difficult ethical dilemmas to face. We all know the codes and we have a pretty good idea where we stand, don’t we? Don’t we? Could you explain your process for working through an ethical dilemma? Do you have a firm foundation to show that you thought deeply and well about all the relevant issues and principles involved? If that makes you squirm a little, this is the workshop for you. True processing of ethical dilemmas involves critical thinking skills. Come join us as we talk about what those are, how they are used, and have some fun learning to use them in a simulation of a treatment environment. This is not your mother’s ethics training! See you there!

How we are making progress on the opioid epidemic in the US

Last year, a public announcement was made at the Milken Institute Future of Health Summit; it was emphasized that while the opioid addiction epidemic took so many lives and harmed so many people, the United States is making a comeback – but it will take some time to get back on track. Numbers are decreasing in opioid abuse, and thankfully those in recovery are beginning to pursue more holistic modes of treatment, such as yoga, meditation, exercise, nutrition management and other safe alternatives. The reality is that the opioid epidemic isn’t quite over – but with government officials, organizations and communities working together, we’re bringing down some of the painful effects this epidemic caused.

Last year, Tonic – a division of Vice Magazine, which publishes information related to sobriety, recovery, disorders and more, highlighted an incredibly important truth about the epidemic, stating,

“…What really killed [those who died in the opioid epidemic] is the fact that we don’t invest in effective prevention, recovery supports, sober living, qualified behavioral healthcare, and consistent, compassionate care for substance use disorder.”

As a nation, we’re striving to provide more education to our communities in hopes of combatting some of the stigma associated with addiction – because although addiction can be difficult to understand for many people, everyone’s life matters.

At Cumberland Heights, we focus on providing the highest care possible – while understanding that everyone has a unique story to tell. More support is needed for those in recovery, and that’s where 12-Step programs can provide a safe, meaningful place for discussion. Respect, compassion, and accountability are necessary to help those we love find their way through recovery – and at Cumberland Heights, it’s our mission to stand by the side of those who’ve struggled in the past to make way for healing, growth and complete restoration.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Talking to your loved one about seeking help for your addiction

One of the most heartbreaking realizations can occur when you discover that when you were high or intoxicated, you said or did something to hurt someone you love. Some people call this “rock bottom” – when it feels as though you’ve made such a huge mistake that you can’t come back from it. In these moments, it’s time to speak up about what you need. You know that you need help, but you may not know how to go about it or what to even say to your loved ones. If dependency hasn’t fully formed and your “rock bottom” hasn’t been reached, you might find yourself asking, What is the next step from here? Just like it is never too late to ask for help- it is never too early to ask for help, and start the journey to recovery.

In 2016, Five Thirty-Eight, a website that publishes information on science and health, politics, economics and more, explained that in most cases, even family members may be unsure about what the next step is. It’s important to note that by approaching your loved ones, you’re taking the first step towards recovery. The following are some clear, concise messages you can give your loved ones to start making active decisions that could better your life:

I know I have a problem, and I don’t know what to do. Please help me.”

“I’ve been thinking a lot lately, and I now understand that what I’ve been doing has been hurting myself and everyone around me. I’m ready to seek help.”

“I want to get out of addiction but I don’t know how. Can you go with me to seek treatment?”

There is so much evidence that emphasizes the effectiveness of treatment, and your first step will be to get a comprehensive assessment completed so that your healthcare team at Cumberland Heights can get you processed into a personalized treatment program. This next step may seem incredibly scary – but it’s the best decision you could’ve made.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 1-800-646-9998.

Dear Friends,

Gifts from generous donors like you make healing possible each year for hundreds of individuals and families who come to us to recover their lives from addiction. Your donations help us to enhance our services, provide patient assistance funding, improve our capital facilities and educate the community on the disease of addiction.

In this report, we have highlighted a few of the experiential therapies we use in treatment. These non-traditional therapies give the counselors ways to meet the patients where they can best relate and express themselves. The counselors can then address repressed feelings and emotions and give the patients ways to face issues or triggers without turning to drugs and alcohol.

Know that when a patient gets the chance to pick up a paint brush or play their own song, as part of a therapeutic activity, you have helped to make it possible. Your gift helps change lives one patient, one family at a time and creates a ripple effect for generations to come.

Sincerely,

Jay Crosson, Chief Executive Officer

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year.

What gifts we all have the most precious of which is each other — that we have one another and can help one another. Miracles happen, and they happen to us.

—Dr. Arch MacNair, Former Chaplain

5 mistakes to avoid during 12-Step programs

There have been so many success stories published from those who’ve worked the 12-Steps in their addiction recovery – and while every person’s journey is different, all of these stories have an underlying similarity: hard work. The way you perceive your recovery is what will have the greatest influence in the long run, so it’s time to assess your expectations about recovery to see if they align with reality.

In the early stages of dependency, feeling connected to a 12-Step program can be challenging. A sense of belonging hasn’t fully developed and a deep understanding of the importance of the program hasn’t totally settled in. It can be easy to disregard the 12-Steps and not pay the program, or people in the program, proper respect.

Take a look at the following mistakes that many people make in recovery when it comes to the 12-Steps:

  1. Do you believe that your 12-Step program serves as a “quick fix”?
  2. Have you been missing meetings in your 12-Step program because you feel that you can “get by” without attending all of them?
  3. Are you holding back from participating in your 12-Step meetings because you believe that simply “showing up” will be enough?
  4. Have you been abusing substances and showing up to your meetings, with the belief that being high or intoxicated doesn’t have an effect on your progress because you’re still attending?
  5. Is there strong doubt in the back of your mind that everything you’re learning in your 12-Step program isn’t really going to help you?

If you can say ‘yes’ to any of these questions, it’s time to re-evaluate where you’re at in your recovery. Last year, Very Well Mind, a website that publishes information related to psychology and disorders, stated that,

“Many members of 12-Step recovery programs have found that these steps were not merely a way to stop drinking, but they became a guide toward a new way of life.”

Sobriety is a lifestyle, and you have to fully apply what you learn as you work through the 12-Steps to every aspect of your life. Not doing so could be holding you back in recovery.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 1-800-646-9998.

How participating in AA and meetings will influence your recovery status

12-Step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous has been around for nearly 100 years – and these programs provide readily available access to social support alongside a structured program that guides individuals through recovery. It’s been clear for quite some time now that addiction isn’t the only matter of concern; in fact, a person’s physical, mental and spiritual health is at risk when addiction is involved, and recovery aims to restore a person’s wellbeing in the best ways possible. 12-Step programs are based on the premise that as human beings, we can’t have control over everything – and sometimes we’re going to fail. With this knowledge, we can admit that we need help from God or another Higher Power – and 12-Step meetings foster this notion through discussion and recovery-related activities.

12-Step Meetings: What’s Needed for Success

A study published in the journal Social Work in Public Health found that there are a number of ways people can engage in 12-Step meetings, which ultimately contribute to their greater participation and success in recovery:

  • Doing service at meetings – such as taking notes, preparing the meeting space, etc.
  • Reading 12-Step literature – which includes the Big Book
  • Doing “step work” – as in working through the 12-Steps
  • Getting a sponsor – by getting to know a qualified individual and asking for their support
  • Calling other 12-Step members – in building a strong, supportive community by calling on peers during challenging times

These are certainly all ways that a person can become involved in 12-Step programs, but what about active participation? In 2018, Very Well Mind, a website that publishes helpful information on psychology and other disorders, noted that at first, participation may not be at the forefront of your mind – after all, you may be feeling nervous and want to simply see how it works. That’s completely understandable, and nobody will judge you for it. However, over time, you’re going to want to start opening up so that you can become more invested in the program itself.

Writer Michael Miller, MD, shared in an article published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) that 12-Step participation can open a number of avenues for learning, such as through exploring one’s values, building one’s connections with others, accepting personal responsibility and humbly asking for help. Contributor Tori Utley explained to Forbes Magazine in 2016 that participation is incredibly important anyone wanted to find success in recovery. She stated:

No one would enroll in a course to learn CPR and expect it to be successful if they never showed up, weren’t paying attention or didn’t participate in the activities. Why do we hold programs like Alcoholics Anonymous to a different standard? In order to succeed in a program of any kind, you actually need to do it.”

With this important insight to 12-Step meetings, does participation change a person’s recovery status? Well, it depends.

Recovery Status: Making Realizations

Individuals who don’t seek formalized treatment but who simply attend 12-Step meetings are relying upon the fact that those support groups alone can turn their lives around; while 12-Step meetings certainly hold a ranking in success from many people in recovery, the most successful are individuals who engage in not only 12-Step programs but in treatment as well. In fact, this collaboration between several different aspects of recovery can strengthen an individual’s commitment to their program – which will improve their chances of success.

Cumberland Heights offers not only inpatient, outpatient and extended care, but we also foster spiritual recovery by integrating treatment with 12-Step programs. The foundation of these programs encourages individuals to look above and beyond their everyday lives to see hope in something bigger than themselves – with over 115,000 meetings worldwide, it’s clear that those in recovery do find significant benefit from participating in these programs.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) notes that integrated treatment programs can tackle a number of troubling perspectives for those in recovery, such as:

  • Helping families work alongside their loved ones in family therapy while also developing strategic coping skills for better living
  • Outreach through both treatment programs and 12-Step programs, as individuals recovering can become part of recovery-related activities that connected them to a greater community
  • One-on-one and group counseling to explore serious topics related to addiction and recovery, as well as the option to work through personal issues that have had a negative influence on a person’s life as well
  • Long-term perspectives, with support from both 12-Step programs and the treatment center through both formalized care and aftercare
  • Comprehensiveness – by evaluating a person’s mental, physical, social and spiritual stance, treatment is more easily adaptable to a person’s needs; 12-Step programs can support this mission in providing those in recovery with added peer support for addiction

Seek Help Today

If you’re ready to take a stand for your recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

A guide to recognizing spirituality and self care while in addiction recovery

12-Step programs – such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA) – serve as a strong foundation for many in recovery. They provide clear steps and spiritual guidance that have helped thousands find their place in the world – alongside building a network of supportive people and a life that’s more fulfilling. Self-care is essential in daily life, but those in addiction recovery have often neglected self-care for quite a long time. Whether you’ve just begun your journey to recovery or you’re considered taking that courageous step towards treatment, it’s important to explore self-care and how it connects to 12-Step programs; because although it’s not talked about as often, there are many links there.

What is Self-Care?

There are many definitions of well-being; Yoga International defines self-care as,

“…what happens when you meet yourself as you are, and where you are”.

When we practice self-care, we’re recognizing that we’re human – and that as human beings, we don’t always have the ability to control what happens to or around us. Instead, we can acknowledge that we’re going to make mistakes – and by doing this, we can start taking steps towards making our lives more fulfilling as we can direct our focus up (to God or another Higher Power) and out (to our community).

In 2018, The Fix, a website that publishes relevant information on addiction and recovery, noted that when addiction is active, we’re more likely to neglect our personal mental, physical and spiritual health. Addiction is a disease that progresses and reels us in as we go – and with it, we may lose parts of ourselves even for a brief moment, along with relationships, jobs, money and more. They recommend the following exercises to implement self-care in recovery:

  1. Writing about how you’re feeling. Get a journal and start keeping track of your thoughts, moods and overall feelings about yourself, your life and your recovery. These brief moments of writing will help you release any pent-up anger, sadness or stress you may be feeling – and, over time, they can also serve as a way to observe patterns in your behavior so that you can take steps to ease your journey.
  2. Taking time to be alone. Addiction often brings people who abuse substances together – but all that substance use does is take us away from the present moment. Spend some time in recovery sitting alone and just breathing. Mindfulness is a beautiful practice that can truly change your life if you embrace slowing down and simply being.
  3. Taking breaks from technology. It’s easy to get caught up in other people’s lives – especially if it feels like there’s more time to relax in recovery. At Cumberland Heights, however, you’ll be involved in a schedule with a lot of activities to keep you focused on your recovery goals – and you’ll find that it’s a nice break from technology.
  4. Move your body. Nutrition and exercise are vital components of wellbeing. As you work towards your physical health, you’ll want to get moving – even if it’s just a walk – so that you can start embracing how wonderful it feels to participate in life at a steady pace.
  5. Connect with others. Previous research has shown just how important it is to build a strong support system, and Cumberland Heights can provide you with many opportunities to do this.

12-Step Programs and Self-Care: What You Need to Know

12-Step programs are made to integrate self-care through weekly meetings and updates. By talking about the problems we’re experiencing and connecting with others, we’re doing a number of self-care acts:

  • We’re relating to others, which builds our sense of community
  • We’re opening up about our problems, which relieves stress
  • We’re problem-solving, which enhances our lives
  • We’re adopting new perspectives which shape the way we lead our lives
  • And more

Several years ago, a study was published in the Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment which assessed 12-Step program effectiveness alongside treatment programs. Researchers found that individuals who participated in 12-Step programs with regular treatment were more likely to remain active participants in their recovery; the 12-Step philosophy encourages people to look beyond themselves and into something much greater. From here, it becomes not only an act of self-care – but acts of care towards a Higher Power and one’s community, too.

Accountability is a highlighted component of 12-Step programs, and they remind us that not only are we not alone but that our actions do have an effect on others. Self-care then becomes part of relapse prevention and daily maintenance, as we attend 12-Step meetings, eat healthily, maintain contact with our sponsor, and participate in other recovery programs to feel continuously uplifted.

Seek Help Today


If you’re ready to push past addiction and build a life that’s fulfilling, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Transitioning from residential treatment to outpatient treatment recovery

Outpatient treatment is explained by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) as a program that can be quite comparable to residential treatment – but those recovering from substance abuse will find there’s more independence, and the nature of the program may vary depending on a person’s individual needs. Outpatient treatment is a beautiful stepping stone for many who want to transition from residential treatment to something that provides them with less supervision – because they want to be able to return home and to start picking up responsibilities in a “normal life”. If you’re ready to begin an intensive outpatient treatment program, you’ll find there are many components that can make you stronger in recovery:

  • Ongoing 12-Step programs
  • Weekly individual and group meetings
  • Case management
  • And more

In addition to this, you’ll be able to return home each day while being able to actively participate in recovery processes that reinforce your goals. There are some major hurdles you’ll experience along the way, though – because with every major transition, there are going to be aspects that take some time to adjust to.

Common Hurdles of The Outpatient Treatment Transition

A publication by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) explains that engagement can be challenging for those in outpatient treatment programs, and in several ways not unique to the program itself:

Personal issues – such as health problems, psychological concerns, motivational status, etc.

Issues with others – problems at home with a significant relationship, family dynamic, support system and others

Societal concerns – cultural differences, fear of stigma and more

Structural implications – treatment policies and procedures may be different from what a person is used to

These particular issues can challenge a person’s ability to attend treatment programs, engage in them or otherwise maintain them over time. In addition to these broad, sweeping concerns that can weigh heavily on a person trying to succeed in outpatient treatment, there are other, more natural hurdles to consider upon entering this type of program:

Home environment – a person needs to ensure that upon their return home, they will have no triggers (such as living in a hostile environment, coming home to other friends or family members who are using drugs, etc.) so they can succeed in meeting their recovery goals

Social support – for optimal recovery, a person truly needs a strong support system at home; people who will be there for them through the good and bad times, and individuals who will not bring them backwards in their goal of sobriety is incredibly important

Discipline – outpatient treatment programs are different from residential programs because there’s much less monitoring and supervision. A person must feel ready to implement the lifestyle they’ve developed in treatment at home, too.

Transportation – with greater independence comes greater responsibilities, and part of outpatient treatment is ensuring that you have a car or other mode of transportation to get you to your recovery activities on time

Responsibilities – work hours, child support and other responsibilities need to be arranged beforehand so a person can carry out their treatment program with as minimal of issues as possible

Overcoming Barriers to Treatment

Despite all of these issues that can arise throughout treatment, there are just as many ways for a person to succeed and overcome these obstacles. First and foremost, communication is essential – if you speak with your support network at Cumberland Heights, you’ll be able to identify these barriers and find ways to work through them alongside people who care. A 2017 study published in The American Journal on Addictions found that motivational interviewing – an approach used in therapy to help a person identify the benefits/negatives of seeking and maintaining help – was greatly beneficial in increasing a person’s engagement in outpatient treatment. Rely on your support team – they’re there to help you push through these barriers and find ways of motivating yourself in recovery.

In addition to communication, organization is essential to ensuring all details are checked off the list for your entrance to the treatment program. Speak with friends, family and managers at your job well before you begin your outpatient treatment program so you can have these responsibilities handled (such as who is picking up the kids, what days you will go into work and what days you will need off, how you’re going to get to treatment and back each week, etc.). Lastly, and most importantly – don’t give up.

Everyone has issues they’re dealing with, but you’ll find that you’re more confident and stable than you’ve ever been once you’re at a good pace in outpatient treatment. This type of program is intensive, but it still provides you with everything you need to continue following the path towards the life you’ve always wanted.

Cumberland Heights in Crossville Tennessee is a 12-Step based outpatient alcohol and drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals age 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. If you’re ready to seek help today, call us at 931-250-5200.


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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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