Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment

Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment


The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

An Evening with Travis Meadows: A Benefit for Cumberland HeightsTravis Meadows spent years trying to escape himself. He’s anything but selfish, so he’d find a way to get away––a bottle, a bag, a sermon––and he’d share it with everyone. That was then. Now, Meadows isn’t trying to get anybody lost or high. Instead, he’s trying to get every single one of us to settle in deeply to ourselves––and love what’s there.

“I feel like what I’m doing is giving people permission to be okay with who they are, where they’re at now,” Meadows says. “A lot of us say stuff like, ‘If I’d been married to this guy or this girl, or if I had enough money, or if I had a better job. If I wasn’t an alcoholic, or if I drank more. If this, if that, then, I think I could be a better person.’” He pauses. “I think the key to life is being okay with who you are.”

Meadows isn’t just waxing poetic about the perks of self-acceptance. The 52-year-old has clawed his way to the peace he’s found, and his willingness to map that journey through his songs has saved more lives than his own. On his anxiously awaited new album First Cigarette, Meadows proves once again that when he sings the truth he’s living, he can set us all free. “I’ve always put secrets in my records, but I had this ring of fire that nobody could get in––a defense mechanism from my childhood. Nobody gets too close,” he says. “I think this record is a way of me letting people in a little more, inside the ring of fire.”

Disciples have been dancing by Meadows’ fire for years. Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, Jake Owen, Mary Gauthier, Brandy Clark, Blackberry Smoke, Hank Williams, Jr., Wynonna Judd, Randy Houser, and others began writing with, recording, and praising Meadows as soon as they heard his work. Songs such as “Riser,” the title track for Bentley’s 2015 album; Church’s “Knives of New Orleans” and “Dark Side”; and Owen’s “What We Ain’t Got” are all Meadows-penned chart-climbers.

Much of the attention began in 2010, when Meadows self-released Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, a raw masterpiece that left listeners stunned. “I was in rehab, and one of my counselors suggested that I keep a journal, so I basically made a record out of that journal,” Meadows says. It became an unlikely phenomenon, handed from friend to friend and artist to artist with whispers of, Listen. It’s the best thing you’ll hear all year. In 2013, Meadows followed Killin’ Uncle Buzzy with the acclaimed Old Ghosts and Unfinished Business. “On Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, you’re listening to a guy trying to figure out how to get sober,” Meadows says. “Then two years later, I was sober, but I wasn’t that guy anymore. That’s what ‘Old Ghosts’ was––me just trying to move forward. I feel like this record is more accessible. People can listen and go, ‘Well, hell. I’ve done that, too.’”

An intimate record utilizing just Meadow’s blues-hewn voice and mostly acoustic guitar with pops of electric and other strings, First Cigarette is an intensely relatable meditation on love, acceptance, and redemption––an artistic and personal triumph, especially for a man whose early life was defined by loss and pain. At the age of two, Meadows watched his baby brother drown. When his parents divorced, he wound up living with his grandparents rather than either of his parents. “My dad went and got married and had a baby, and they were almost a normal family,” Meadows says. “And my mother also went and almost had a normal family, whatever that is.” His thick Mississippi accent makes the ‘r’ at the end of father and mother soft in his mouth. “I was over there with my grandparents like, ‘Well what the hell happened to me? Why am I not good enough to be part of that family?’ I carried that resentment for a long time.”

Adversity would remain a constant in Meadows’ youth. At the age of eleven, he began using drugs. At fourteen, he was diagnosed with cancer. He would go on to beat the disease, but not before it cost him his right leg from just below the knee. Meadows picked himself up and began playing drums––“They’d sneak me in the back door and I would play for people in bars”––but tired of lugging all that gear and picked up the harmonica. “I could put all my instruments in a Crown Royal bag, and I would sing and play the blues,” he says. Then, in his 20s, Meadows underwent another conversion: he became a Christian. He preached across the South and in 20-something countries for 17 years. “Preachers fall hard,” he says. “I had some questions I didn’t like the answers to. So I quit and went back to my old friend alcohol.”

First Cigarette benefits from all of the battles Meadows has lost and won, including his now seven years––and counting––of sobriety. Album opener “Sideways” is a gut punch. A blend of confession and advice, the song explores what happens when emotion is stifled. Meadows wrote “Sideways” after performing and speaking at an adolescent addiction treatment center. He asked the kids there, all younger than 18, if anyone wanted to share their story. A girl raised her hand, spoke, and broke Meadows’ heart. “She floored me,” he says. “I said, ‘Well, I’d want to get high too. How did that make you feel?’ One tear came down her cheek. She rubbed it away and said, ‘I don’t feel nothin’.’ One of the counselors and I were talking later. If the only tool you have is a hammer, you’re going to treat everything in your life like a nail.”

“Pray for Jungleland” channels Bruce Springsteen as it celebrates him, nostalgic for love at eighteen and a world that revolves around Friday night. Written with Drew Kennedy, the song is the first of several on the album that capture youth with misty-eyed levity––a departure from Uncle Buzzy that Meadows is clearly enjoying. “McDowell Road” serves as a thematic bookend for “Jungleland,” while the slow-building “Pontiac” offers anchoring advice and warm memories as hopes for young hearts.

A standout on an album stacked with gems, “First Cigarette” features searing vocals that shift back and forth between defiant muscle and naked delicacy. “I am little more content, I am little more content with who I am than who I was,” Meadows sings. “I have learned to love the comfort when it comes, like the first cigarette the morning buzz.” Written with Connie Harrington, “Hungry” showcases Meadows’ unique ability to haunt and soothe at the same time. “Hunger is the thing that motivates us to get up and try again,” he says. “I pray that I never lose that hunger.” The gorgeous “Better Boat” takes another moving look at Meadows’ hard-won contentment.

“Life can be a little challenging for all of us. It’s beautiful and it’s tragic, it’s awesome and it hurts,” Meadows says. “I hope people sense that through this record and want to come to a show, which is a lot of storytelling, a lot of tears, a lot of laughter. They’ll come face to face with a damn lot of humanity. I hope they see themselves in it.”

This Show is Sold Out!

Generations of well-intentioned professionals have driven home the message to parents of those affected by addiction, “there’s nothing you can do until your child is ready to get help.” The person with addiction is powerless over drugs, alcohol and their disease, but that doesn’t mean that they are powerless over everything. Similarly, parents are powerless over their child and addiction, but they aren’t powerless over everything either.

Objectives for Participants are to:

  • Review The Stages of Change Model
  • Explore the Implications of Action-Ready Parents with Non-action-ready Children with Addiction
  • Identify at least 5 Opportunities for Action-Ready Parents
  • Identify at least 5 Opportunities for Professionals Serving Families Affected by Addiction

About Ginny Mills:

Ginny Mills joined the addiction recovery field over 25 years ago and now leads both Parenting Through Addiction (a web-based education & consultation service) and Full Life Counseling and Recovery (an outpatient private practice) in Winston-Salem, NC. She holds a master’s degree from Wake Forest University and credentials in both general mental health and addiction counseling.

Ginny has experience leading in primary residential, sober living and outpatient addiction treatment settings, including service as the Chief Clinical Officer for Partnership for a Drug-Free NC, She has a strong understanding of both the clinical and parental aspects of supporting those affected by the disease of addiction. Ginny loves to scuba dive, travel and ski with her husband and adult daughters (one of whom is in sustained recovery).

This fall, Ginny will release her new book Parenting Through Your Adult Child’s Addiction: Making Sense of Treatment, Aftercare and Recovery Recommendations.

PLEASE NOTE: There are 2 Sessions are available for convenience, you do not need to attend both.

  • Session One: 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM (registration begins at 8:30 AM)
  • Session Two: 1:00 PM-4:00 PM (registration begins at 12:30 PM)

3 CE credits awarded, approved by NAADAC and NBCC

 

REGISTER HERE

Legal and Ethical Game Show Event

Legal & Ethical Game Show EventSay good-bye to dull legal and ethical trainings! This style of presentation grew out of recognition that most mental health professionals do not need another lecture on typical legal and ethical topics. What has been needed is a fun, stimulating way to review and learn from what they already know. Participants are broken into teams and each team has an electronic remote that sends the team’s answer to questions to a computer that keeps scores. Answers from teams are scored, graphed, posted, and discussed. Sponsors can provide prizes to the winning team. In one format, questions are presented on a Jeopardy-style screen where categories are chosen and questions get harder as point values increase. The full-day training includes a Family Feud component. This presentation can accommodate any size audience. For large audiences, a gallery is created in the back of the room and play along as desired. The questions posed have been years in development and often focus on lesser-known aspects of legal and ethical quandaries.

Evaluations for this training have been exceptionally positive. Audience members have had a wonderful time discussing and working through perplexing questions. I have never seen a training format that stimulated so much discussion and where time flew by so fast. All legal and ethical questions are designed for all mental health settings and guilds including counseling, social work, psychology, marriage and family, psychiatry, drug and alcohol, case management, etc. For substance abuse counselors a special section can be included covering 42 CFR. This program is available in a 3 or 6-hour format. For large audiences morning and afternoon sessions could be advertised and attendees could choose the most convenient session to attend. For more information please visit:

Credit: 3 Hours

REGISTER HERE

Does poverty affect addiction?

In the movies, we often see and hear of people living in extremely poor conditions – and most portrayals depict individuals having become addicted to a substance and later losing everything they own because of it. The National Council on Drug Abuse states that in many other instances, however, it’s the other way around – and when poverty strikes, it becomes even harder to not abuse substances because people may be trying to find a “way out” – even if it’s not the healthiest way.

By gaining a better understanding of the different instances that arise throughout the country, we can hopefully open up a clearer mind – and eye – to the troubling event of addiction.

The Prevalence of Poverty in Communities

Poverty USA, an organization dedicated to helping educate people about poverty as well as more spiritual aspects of life, states that approximately 15.3 million children across the U.S. are currently living in poverty; and a few years ago, a study showed that 43.1 million Americans were living in poverty. These numbers indicate not only that we have a huge poverty concern nationwide, but also that there is an increased risk of substance abuse amongst these communities – and in many cases, it’s because of stress, mental illness and more. Some homes experience physical and/or emotional abuse, and those in the household may feel that they can’t escape – so they turn to alcohol or other substances to try and ease the pain.

The Center for Poverty Research at the University of California, Davis, emphasized that there are also periods of transition in poverty, such as when a person undergoes a major life event such as:

  • Marriage
  • Divorce
  • Sudden changes in income
  • And more

For these individuals, a sudden concern becomes money and providing for one’s family – which can perpetuate the desire to use substances in attempts to numb some of the overwhelming feelings of frustration and exhaustion often experienced in these circumstances. In a similar manner, those in impoverished communities may have difficulty accessing treatment due to a lack of resources or knowledge that these resources exist.

Prevalence of Addiction in Communities

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explains that more than $740 billion dollars are spent annually on substance abuse costs related to crime, healthcare and lost work productivity. The opioid epidemic has shown a major light on the severity of addiction in the United States, and the Surgeon General reported a few years ago that 1 in 7 people in the U.S. will battle addiction. The outlook on those with addiction may be different as it relates to poverty, however, as a person who is rich or poor may experience substance abuse issues. In addition to this, Vivek Murthy, the Surgeon General, stated:

“We have to recognize (addiction) isn’t evidence of a character flaw or a moral failing. It’s a chronic disease of the brain that deserves the same compassion that any other chronic illness does, like diabetes or heart disease.”

On the outside looking in, it may seem like only those who are poor encounter substance abuse; Live Science, a website that publishes information related to news, technology, health, environment and more, explains that recent research has identified those who are age 26 and upper-middle-class experience an increased risk of battling substance abuse and/or addiction by two to three times. In fact, other studies have shown that higher-income households may increase a young adult’s chances of abusing marijuana and alcohol.

Adults earning high figures may battle substance abuse as the pressure for demand increases – greater responsibility in higher-level positions can cause some to revert to using certain substances to relax or to stay energized throughout the day.

The Truth? Each Case Is Different

The reality is that addiction doesn’t cause poverty just as poverty doesn’t cause addiction. However, each one can increase a person’s risk for battling with the other, depending on that person’s individual circumstances and other risk factors. It becomes increasingly difficult to seek help when you find yourself stuck in a negative cycle that’s hard to break, and that is where professional treatment should come in.

As one person stated:

“When you can stop, you don’t want to. When you want to stop, you can’t. That’s addiction.”

Addiction affects so many people across the globe in different ways, but the first path towards healing is to seek out a team of people who believe in your journey. If you’re ready to develop meaningful connections through 12-Step programs, enhance your spiritual journey and finding greater purpose in life, become engulfed in the recovery world in some truly meaningful ways and more, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

This presentation aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shift in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

Lunch is provided and no refunds are given.

 

Agenda:

7:00-7:30
Registration Opens (Coffee served)

7:30-7:45
Welcome to Attendees and CE announcements

7:45-9:00
Comprehensive Pain Recovery
J. Gregory Hobelmann, M.D., MPH

9:00-9:05 Break

9:05-10:20
A Paradigm Shift in Treatment: The Three Core Systems
Adrian Hickmon, PhD, LPC-S, LMFT-S, CSAT-S, CMAT-S, CTT, EMDR

10:20-11:35
Society, Addiction and Young Adults
Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC

11:35-12:05 Lunch is Served

12:05-1:20
Meaningful Engagement with the Substance Abusing Adolescent Male
Dean Porterfield, LPC, MHSP, NCC
Caleb Vogtner, LPC, MHSP, NCC

1:20-2:35
Causes and Conditions and Addiction
Dana Pollack, LCSW

2:35-2:40 Break

2:40-3:55
Family and Personal Recovery, A Parallel Process: The Case for Family Systems Treatment
Ryan Hanson, MA, CAP

3:55-5:10
Comprehensive Diagnostic Evaluations-Taking the Guess Work Out of Healthcare
James Flowers, LPC-S, PhD.

5:10-5:15 Break

5:15-6:30
The Blessings
Judith Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT

 

 

REGISTER HERE

 

 

How families can seek treatment when battling drug use and peer pressure

Families are at a high-time for battling drug abuse and peer pressure; with accessibility to prescription medications and illicit drugs on the streets, adolescents and family members as a whole are threatened with serious health risks and related concerns. Loved ones often experience a feeling of compromise when they bend a little to appease to friends and family – when asked for substances, family members may lean towards saying, “yes” because they don’t want to appear disagreeable or may otherwise attempt to keep peace in the family.

A publication by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) explains that a number of factors can take place within families, which makes them more susceptible for drug abuse and/or peer pressure:

  • Feeling abandonment, anxiety, fear, anger, etc.
  • Being asked to take on additional responsibilities can add pressure to family members
  • Inconsistency in the family dynamic may make it easier for family members to use substances
  • Denial that a family member is struggling with substances may only perpetuate the problem

Make zero-tolerance for substance abuse a strict value in your family.

HealthyChildren.org notes that it all starts with parents – preventative talks can help children in the family understand the dangerousness of abusing substances and explaining clear rules against drug use can help as well. Maintain open communication as much as possible and foster a healthy family dynamic. If family members feel their voice is heard, they’ll be less likely to turn to substances.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) notes that certain parenting skills – such as listening, following up with family members in the household, and holding one another accountable can greatly help maintain stability at home. If you’ve been battling substance abuse, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today – it’s never too late to take back control of your life.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Finding gratitude and faith in recovery

When we’re battling addiction, it can feel as though we’ve lost sight of what truly matters in our lives. We become focused on seeking out substances, thereby missing the opportunity to grow in our personal and spiritual journey to wellness; in this downfall, we may lose aspects of ourselves that once meant so much to us – such as our health, relationships, career path, hobbies and more. Before we know it, we may find ourselves battling unhealthy emotions like guilt, isolation, anger and resentment – and if we continue spiraling down this path, we may go on to experience even more hardship and destruction in our lives.

Recovery is incredibly difficult for this exact reason – with so much to overcome, we must push ourselves harder than ever before to find the light amidst the darkness. By adopting crucial positive emotions while healing – gratitude, acceptance and faith – we are much more likely to carry out recovery in beautiful ways we never thought were possible.

Why Perception is So Important

A few years ago, Forbes Magazine likened perception to a mathematical equation that becomes complex;

“This infinite mathematical equation continues throughout our lives and it is too awesome for the human mind to calculate. Exponentially it builds a calculation that is way beyond our capabilities to imagine. No wonder our perceptions are unique to only us.”

As human beings, it’s completely natural for us to focus more on what’s going wrong rather than what’s going right. If you’ve ever taken an inventory of how your day went before you went to bed, it’s suddenly easier to remember the small moments of disappointment or frustration rather than to recall the singing birds outside the window, the gentle rain that was so relaxing or the kind word that was said by a friend or loved one. Why is this?

The Huffington Post explains that used to be an effective mode for survival – if we were able to perceive problems, we were more likely to survive – but nowadays, it only perpetuates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety. So how can we combat this natural tendency to look at everything negatively?

Use These Tools

There are several small steps we can take each day to increase positive thoughts and emotions; we just have to make the time to do them:

  • Relish in the moments that bring us joy – When something happens that makes us smile, we can tune into all of our senses to really enjoy the present moment. By basking in this beautiful instance, we’re appreciating the good that’s just come into our lives – which ultimately leaves us in a happier state of mind.
  • Maintain a gratitude journal – It may sound silly but writing down the things we’re grateful for each day can help us remain satisfied in our daily lives. Sometimes we forget the small, precious moments that have added beauty to our day – and a gratitude journal will ensure that we don’t forget them.
  • Take a break from the news – journalists often report gore and tragic events because that’s what draws attention; but for many people, the news only adds negativity. Take a break from watching the news, and instead fuel up with some positive things – such as uplifting music.
  • Use critical thinking with your judgments – the next time you find yourself judging a situation negatively, utilize your critical thinking and assess – is that completely accurate? Could there have been another meaning that could be derived from the situation? By challenging yourself, you’re helping change those habits in the mind that perpetuate a state of pessimism.

Using 12-Step Programs to Foster Mental, Physical and Spiritual Wellness

There are many beautiful areas of recovery that also foster this type of growth. Mindfulness and meditation, for example, are evidence-based, holistic practices that teach individuals how to focus more on the present moment. In doing this, the chaotic thought processes that typically occur are gently guided to more positive, simplistic ways of being – and this is the start of a beautiful journey to recovery for many.

12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA), also encourage positive thinking by helping individuals work through what has previously held them back. No matter what we’ve gone through in the past, we can’t fully heal until we’ve worked diligently in recovery – and 12-Step programs provide a safe space for people to do this alongside others in similar situations. In fact, the following are what you can find amongst the 12-Steps:

  1. Honesty
  2. Faith
  3. Surrender
  4. Soul Searching
  5. Integrity
  6. Acceptance
  7. Humility
  8. Willingness
  9. Forgiveness
  10. Maintenance
  11. Making Contact
  12. Service

It is through these steps that many people find a more enriching life, with healthy connections to others and tools to help them navigate challenging situations. Rather than feeling lost and abandoned, those in recovery can share and learn from others in a setting that promotes healing and growth. Sponsors further support individuals by guiding them through some of life’s greatest challenges, and perceptions become shaped more towards a life of healing as time goes on.

Begin Your Journey Today

Even if it feels scary to take the leap forward, recovery is a positive change that can enhance a person’s life in ways they never thought imaginable. Don’t wait and allow those negative thoughts to take over your life any longer – make a pact to start the journey to increased happiness, gratitude and faith today by speaking with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Your personal recovery journey is like a fingerprint. While many of them look and feel the same, unique experiences make our stories one of a kind. They can inspire, heal, create hope or even push someone to take that first step in their own journey.

Liz sits down with our Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime's greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It's a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

That’s what Cumberland Heights’ new podcast “Recovery Live” is all about. Liz Stanislawski, Marketing and Public Relations Manager and former WSMV journalist will be interviewing alumni, staff, family members, counselors – really anyone who has been touched by addiction. The podcast is co-produced by Jaime Gibbons, Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator. She is the very first guest, talking about what 16 years of sobriety looks like.

Travis Meadows

Cumberland Heights also welcomed Travis Meadows on the show. The successful singer/songwriter is known for penning hits for several country music stars including Wynonna Judd, Jake Owen, Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Hank Williams Jr. He also has several albums of his own like “Killing Uncle Buzzy” which was inspired by journal entries he wrote while he was in treatment at Cumberland Heights.

Click here to listen!

Future guests include a meth addict whose story was broadcast to millions on the A&E reality show, “Intervention”, a teen who grew up in the recovery world and ended up becoming addicted himself and a woman who as a young teen had to take care of her siblings when her mom disappeared for days.

These stories don’t sugarcoat. They are real, raw and honest. From teenagers with just a couple years of sobriety, to those who haven’t picked up a drink or drug in 30 plus years.

We are so excited to share this new project with you and hope you’ll gain as much from listening as we have putting it together.


Recovery is Possible

Recover Life.

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