Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment

Tag Archives: Addiction Treatment


Does poverty affect addiction?

In the movies, we often see and hear of people living in extremely poor conditions – and most portrayals depict individuals having become addicted to a substance and later losing everything they own because of it. The National Council on Drug Abuse states that in many other instances, however, it’s the other way around – and when poverty strikes, it becomes even harder to not abuse substances because people may be trying to find a “way out” – even if it’s not the healthiest way.

By gaining a better understanding of the different instances that arise throughout the country, we can hopefully open up a clearer mind – and eye – to the troubling event of addiction.

The Prevalence of Poverty in Communities

Poverty USA, an organization dedicated to helping educate people about poverty as well as more spiritual aspects of life, states that approximately 15.3 million children across the U.S. are currently living in poverty; and a few years ago, a study showed that 43.1 million Americans were living in poverty. These numbers indicate not only that we have a huge poverty concern nationwide, but also that there is an increased risk of substance abuse amongst these communities – and in many cases, it’s because of stress, mental illness and more. Some homes experience physical and/or emotional abuse, and those in the household may feel that they can’t escape – so they turn to alcohol or other substances to try and ease the pain.

The Center for Poverty Research at the University of California, Davis, emphasized that there are also periods of transition in poverty, such as when a person undergoes a major life event such as:

  • Marriage
  • Divorce
  • Sudden changes in income
  • And more

For these individuals, a sudden concern becomes money and providing for one’s family – which can perpetuate the desire to use substances in attempts to numb some of the overwhelming feelings of frustration and exhaustion often experienced in these circumstances. In a similar manner, those in impoverished communities may have difficulty accessing treatment due to a lack of resources or knowledge that these resources exist.

Prevalence of Addiction in Communities

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explains that more than $740 billion dollars are spent annually on substance abuse costs related to crime, healthcare and lost work productivity. The opioid epidemic has shown a major light on the severity of addiction in the United States, and the Surgeon General reported a few years ago that 1 in 7 people in the U.S. will battle addiction. The outlook on those with addiction may be different as it relates to poverty, however, as a person who is rich or poor may experience substance abuse issues. In addition to this, Vivek Murthy, the Surgeon General, stated:

“We have to recognize (addiction) isn’t evidence of a character flaw or a moral failing. It’s a chronic disease of the brain that deserves the same compassion that any other chronic illness does, like diabetes or heart disease.”

On the outside looking in, it may seem like only those who are poor encounter substance abuse; Live Science, a website that publishes information related to news, technology, health, environment and more, explains that recent research has identified those who are age 26 and upper-middle-class experience an increased risk of battling substance abuse and/or addiction by two to three times. In fact, other studies have shown that higher-income households may increase a young adult’s chances of abusing marijuana and alcohol.

Adults earning high figures may battle substance abuse as the pressure for demand increases – greater responsibility in higher-level positions can cause some to revert to using certain substances to relax or to stay energized throughout the day.

The Truth? Each Case Is Different

The reality is that addiction doesn’t cause poverty just as poverty doesn’t cause addiction. However, each one can increase a person’s risk for battling with the other, depending on that person’s individual circumstances and other risk factors. It becomes increasingly difficult to seek help when you find yourself stuck in a negative cycle that’s hard to break, and that is where professional treatment should come in.

As one person stated:

“When you can stop, you don’t want to. When you want to stop, you can’t. That’s addiction.”

Addiction affects so many people across the globe in different ways, but the first path towards healing is to seek out a team of people who believe in your journey. If you’re ready to develop meaningful connections through 12-Step programs, enhance your spiritual journey and finding greater purpose in life, become engulfed in the recovery world in some truly meaningful ways and more, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

This presentation aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shift in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

Lunch is provided and no refunds are given.

 

Agenda:

7:00-7:30
Registration Opens (Coffee served)

7:30-7:45
Welcome to Attendees and CE announcements

7:45-9:00
Comprehensive Pain Recovery
J. Gregory Hobelmann, M.D., MPH

9:00-9:05 Break

9:05-10:20
A Paradigm Shift in Treatment: The Three Core Systems
Adrian Hickmon, PhD, LPC-S, LMFT-S, CSAT-S, CMAT-S, CTT, EMDR

10:20-11:35
Society, Addiction and Young Adults
Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC

11:35-12:05 Lunch is Served

12:05-1:20
Meaningful Engagement with the Substance Abusing Adolescent Male
Dean Porterfield, LPC, MHSP, NCC
Caleb Vogtner, LPC, MHSP, NCC

1:20-2:35
Causes and Conditions and Addiction
Dana Pollack, LCSW

2:35-2:40 Break

2:40-3:55
Family and Personal Recovery, A Parallel Process: The Case for Family Systems Treatment
Ryan Hanson, MA, CAP

3:55-5:10
Comprehensive Diagnostic Evaluations-Taking the Guess Work Out of Healthcare
James Flowers, LPC-S, PhD.

5:10-5:15 Break

5:15-6:30
The Blessings
Judith Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT

 

 

REGISTER HERE

 

 

How families can seek treatment when battling drug use and peer pressure

Families are at a high-time for battling drug abuse and peer pressure; with accessibility to prescription medications and illicit drugs on the streets, adolescents and family members as a whole are threatened with serious health risks and related concerns. Loved ones often experience a feeling of compromise when they bend a little to appease to friends and family – when asked for substances, family members may lean towards saying, “yes” because they don’t want to appear disagreeable or may otherwise attempt to keep peace in the family.

A publication by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) explains that a number of factors can take place within families, which makes them more susceptible for drug abuse and/or peer pressure:

  • Feeling abandonment, anxiety, fear, anger, etc.
  • Being asked to take on additional responsibilities can add pressure to family members
  • Inconsistency in the family dynamic may make it easier for family members to use substances
  • Denial that a family member is struggling with substances may only perpetuate the problem

Make zero-tolerance for substance abuse a strict value in your family.

HealthyChildren.org notes that it all starts with parents – preventative talks can help children in the family understand the dangerousness of abusing substances and explaining clear rules against drug use can help as well. Maintain open communication as much as possible and foster a healthy family dynamic. If family members feel their voice is heard, they’ll be less likely to turn to substances.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) notes that certain parenting skills – such as listening, following up with family members in the household, and holding one another accountable can greatly help maintain stability at home. If you’ve been battling substance abuse, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today – it’s never too late to take back control of your life.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Finding gratitude and faith in recovery

When we’re battling addiction, it can feel as though we’ve lost sight of what truly matters in our lives. We become focused on seeking out substances, thereby missing the opportunity to grow in our personal and spiritual journey to wellness; in this downfall, we may lose aspects of ourselves that once meant so much to us – such as our health, relationships, career path, hobbies and more. Before we know it, we may find ourselves battling unhealthy emotions like guilt, isolation, anger and resentment – and if we continue spiraling down this path, we may go on to experience even more hardship and destruction in our lives.

Recovery is incredibly difficult for this exact reason – with so much to overcome, we must push ourselves harder than ever before to find the light amidst the darkness. By adopting crucial positive emotions while healing – gratitude, acceptance and faith – we are much more likely to carry out recovery in beautiful ways we never thought were possible.

Why Perception is So Important

A few years ago, Forbes Magazine likened perception to a mathematical equation that becomes complex;

“This infinite mathematical equation continues throughout our lives and it is too awesome for the human mind to calculate. Exponentially it builds a calculation that is way beyond our capabilities to imagine. No wonder our perceptions are unique to only us.”

As human beings, it’s completely natural for us to focus more on what’s going wrong rather than what’s going right. If you’ve ever taken an inventory of how your day went before you went to bed, it’s suddenly easier to remember the small moments of disappointment or frustration rather than to recall the singing birds outside the window, the gentle rain that was so relaxing or the kind word that was said by a friend or loved one. Why is this?

The Huffington Post explains that used to be an effective mode for survival – if we were able to perceive problems, we were more likely to survive – but nowadays, it only perpetuates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety. So how can we combat this natural tendency to look at everything negatively?

Use These Tools

There are several small steps we can take each day to increase positive thoughts and emotions; we just have to make the time to do them:

  • Relish in the moments that bring us joy – When something happens that makes us smile, we can tune into all of our senses to really enjoy the present moment. By basking in this beautiful instance, we’re appreciating the good that’s just come into our lives – which ultimately leaves us in a happier state of mind.
  • Maintain a gratitude journal – It may sound silly but writing down the things we’re grateful for each day can help us remain satisfied in our daily lives. Sometimes we forget the small, precious moments that have added beauty to our day – and a gratitude journal will ensure that we don’t forget them.
  • Take a break from the news – journalists often report gore and tragic events because that’s what draws attention; but for many people, the news only adds negativity. Take a break from watching the news, and instead fuel up with some positive things – such as uplifting music.
  • Use critical thinking with your judgments – the next time you find yourself judging a situation negatively, utilize your critical thinking and assess – is that completely accurate? Could there have been another meaning that could be derived from the situation? By challenging yourself, you’re helping change those habits in the mind that perpetuate a state of pessimism.

Using 12-Step Programs to Foster Mental, Physical and Spiritual Wellness

There are many beautiful areas of recovery that also foster this type of growth. Mindfulness and meditation, for example, are evidence-based, holistic practices that teach individuals how to focus more on the present moment. In doing this, the chaotic thought processes that typically occur are gently guided to more positive, simplistic ways of being – and this is the start of a beautiful journey to recovery for many.

12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA), also encourage positive thinking by helping individuals work through what has previously held them back. No matter what we’ve gone through in the past, we can’t fully heal until we’ve worked diligently in recovery – and 12-Step programs provide a safe space for people to do this alongside others in similar situations. In fact, the following are what you can find amongst the 12-Steps:

  1. Honesty
  2. Faith
  3. Surrender
  4. Soul Searching
  5. Integrity
  6. Acceptance
  7. Humility
  8. Willingness
  9. Forgiveness
  10. Maintenance
  11. Making Contact
  12. Service

It is through these steps that many people find a more enriching life, with healthy connections to others and tools to help them navigate challenging situations. Rather than feeling lost and abandoned, those in recovery can share and learn from others in a setting that promotes healing and growth. Sponsors further support individuals by guiding them through some of life’s greatest challenges, and perceptions become shaped more towards a life of healing as time goes on.

Begin Your Journey Today

Even if it feels scary to take the leap forward, recovery is a positive change that can enhance a person’s life in ways they never thought imaginable. Don’t wait and allow those negative thoughts to take over your life any longer – make a pact to start the journey to increased happiness, gratitude and faith today by speaking with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Your personal recovery journey is like a fingerprint. While many of them look and feel the same, unique experiences make our stories one of a kind. They can inspire, heal, create hope or even push someone to take that first step in their own journey.

Liz sits down with our Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime's greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It's a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

That’s what Cumberland Heights’ new podcast “Recovery Live” is all about. Liz Stanislawski, Marketing and Public Relations Manager and former WSMV journalist will be interviewing alumni, staff, family members, counselors – really anyone who has been touched by addiction. The podcast is co-produced by Jaime Gibbons, Alumni Relations & Volunteer Coordinator. She is the very first guest, talking about what 16 years of sobriety looks like.

Travis Meadows

Cumberland Heights also welcomed Travis Meadows on the show. The successful singer/songwriter is known for penning hits for several country music stars including Wynonna Judd, Jake Owen, Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Hank Williams Jr. He also has several albums of his own like “Killing Uncle Buzzy” which was inspired by journal entries he wrote while he was in treatment at Cumberland Heights.

Click here to listen!

Future guests include a meth addict whose story was broadcast to millions on the A&E reality show, “Intervention”, a teen who grew up in the recovery world and ended up becoming addicted himself and a woman who as a young teen had to take care of her siblings when her mom disappeared for days.

These stories don’t sugarcoat. They are real, raw and honest. From teenagers with just a couple years of sobriety, to those who haven’t picked up a drink or drug in 30 plus years.

We are so excited to share this new project with you and hope you’ll gain as much from listening as we have putting it together.

Cumberland Heights Opioid Epidemic Flyer

Navigating Through the Ethical Swamp: Do You Have the Tools?

 

WHO: Open to the public
WHERE: FLC Room 114/115 – Cumberland Heights River Road Campus
WHEN: July 19, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM

With the opioid epidemic, the increasing complexity of healthcare and reimbursement, medication supported recovery, the demand for standardized assessments and evidence based treatments, measurable outcomes, and the move toward integration into primary care, the addiction treatment field has never had more difficult ethical dilemmas to face. We all know the codes and we have a pretty good idea where we stand, don’t we? Don’t we? Could you explain your process for working through an ethical dilemma? Do you have a firm foundation to show that you thought deeply and well about all the relevant issues and principles involved? If that makes you squirm a little, this is the workshop for you. True processing of ethical dilemmas involves critical thinking skills. Come join us as we talk about what those are, how they are used, and have some fun learning to use them in a simulation of a treatment environment. This is not your mother’s ethics training! See you there!

How we are making progress on the opioid epidemic in the US

Last year, a public announcement was made at the Milken Institute Future of Health Summit; it was emphasized that while the opioid addiction epidemic took so many lives and harmed so many people, the United States is making a comeback – but it will take some time to get back on track. Numbers are decreasing in opioid abuse, and thankfully those in recovery are beginning to pursue more holistic modes of treatment, such as yoga, meditation, exercise, nutrition management and other safe alternatives. The reality is that the opioid epidemic isn’t quite over – but with government officials, organizations and communities working together, we’re bringing down some of the painful effects this epidemic caused.

Last year, Tonic – a division of Vice Magazine, which publishes information related to sobriety, recovery, disorders and more, highlighted an incredibly important truth about the epidemic, stating,

“…What really killed [those who died in the opioid epidemic] is the fact that we don’t invest in effective prevention, recovery supports, sober living, qualified behavioral healthcare, and consistent, compassionate care for substance use disorder.”

As a nation, we’re striving to provide more education to our communities in hopes of combatting some of the stigma associated with addiction – because although addiction can be difficult to understand for many people, everyone’s life matters.

At Cumberland Heights, we focus on providing the highest care possible – while understanding that everyone has a unique story to tell. More support is needed for those in recovery, and that’s where 12-Step programs can provide a safe, meaningful place for discussion. Respect, compassion, and accountability are necessary to help those we love find their way through recovery – and at Cumberland Heights, it’s our mission to stand by the side of those who’ve struggled in the past to make way for healing, growth and complete restoration.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Talking to your loved one about seeking help for your addiction

One of the most heartbreaking realizations can occur when you discover that when you were high or intoxicated, you said or did something to hurt someone you love. Some people call this “rock bottom” – when it feels as though you’ve made such a huge mistake that you can’t come back from it. In these moments, it’s time to speak up about what you need. You know that you need help, but you may not know how to go about it or what to even say to your loved ones. If dependency hasn’t fully formed and your “rock bottom” hasn’t been reached, you might find yourself asking, What is the next step from here? Just like it is never too late to ask for help- it is never too early to ask for help, and start the journey to recovery.

In 2016, Five Thirty-Eight, a website that publishes information on science and health, politics, economics and more, explained that in most cases, even family members may be unsure about what the next step is. It’s important to note that by approaching your loved ones, you’re taking the first step towards recovery. The following are some clear, concise messages you can give your loved ones to start making active decisions that could better your life:

I know I have a problem, and I don’t know what to do. Please help me.”

“I’ve been thinking a lot lately, and I now understand that what I’ve been doing has been hurting myself and everyone around me. I’m ready to seek help.”

“I want to get out of addiction but I don’t know how. Can you go with me to seek treatment?”

There is so much evidence that emphasizes the effectiveness of treatment, and your first step will be to get a comprehensive assessment completed so that your healthcare team at Cumberland Heights can get you processed into a personalized treatment program. This next step may seem incredibly scary – but it’s the best decision you could’ve made.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 1-800-646-9998.

Dear Friends,

Gifts from generous donors like you make healing possible each year for hundreds of individuals and families who come to us to recover their lives from addiction. Your donations help us to enhance our services, provide patient assistance funding, improve our capital facilities and educate the community on the disease of addiction.

In this report, we have highlighted a few of the experiential therapies we use in treatment. These non-traditional therapies give the counselors ways to meet the patients where they can best relate and express themselves. The counselors can then address repressed feelings and emotions and give the patients ways to face issues or triggers without turning to drugs and alcohol.

Know that when a patient gets the chance to pick up a paint brush or play their own song, as part of a therapeutic activity, you have helped to make it possible. Your gift helps change lives one patient, one family at a time and creates a ripple effect for generations to come.

Sincerely,

Jay Crosson, Chief Executive Officer

Everything we accomplish is because of donors like you and the hundreds of others who generously give to Cumberland Heights every year.

What gifts we all have the most precious of which is each other — that we have one another and can help one another. Miracles happen, and they happen to us.

—Dr. Arch MacNair, Former Chaplain

5 mistakes to avoid during 12-Step programs

There have been so many success stories published from those who’ve worked the 12-Steps in their addiction recovery – and while every person’s journey is different, all of these stories have an underlying similarity: hard work. The way you perceive your recovery is what will have the greatest influence in the long run, so it’s time to assess your expectations about recovery to see if they align with reality.

In the early stages of dependency, feeling connected to a 12-Step program can be challenging. A sense of belonging hasn’t fully developed and a deep understanding of the importance of the program hasn’t totally settled in. It can be easy to disregard the 12-Steps and not pay the program, or people in the program, proper respect.

Take a look at the following mistakes that many people make in recovery when it comes to the 12-Steps:

  1. Do you believe that your 12-Step program serves as a “quick fix”?
  2. Have you been missing meetings in your 12-Step program because you feel that you can “get by” without attending all of them?
  3. Are you holding back from participating in your 12-Step meetings because you believe that simply “showing up” will be enough?
  4. Have you been abusing substances and showing up to your meetings, with the belief that being high or intoxicated doesn’t have an effect on your progress because you’re still attending?
  5. Is there strong doubt in the back of your mind that everything you’re learning in your 12-Step program isn’t really going to help you?

If you can say ‘yes’ to any of these questions, it’s time to re-evaluate where you’re at in your recovery. Last year, Very Well Mind, a website that publishes information related to psychology and disorders, stated that,

“Many members of 12-Step recovery programs have found that these steps were not merely a way to stop drinking, but they became a guide toward a new way of life.”

Sobriety is a lifestyle, and you have to fully apply what you learn as you work through the 12-Steps to every aspect of your life. Not doing so could be holding you back in recovery.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 1-800-646-9998.


Recovery is Possible

Recover Life.

Secure Contact: Confidential Email Form

Call Today: 800-646-9998

Stay in the Know

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Get Confidential Help from Cumberland Heights Treatment Center

FOR A CONFIDENTIAL ADMISSIONS ASSESSMENT

If you or a loved one would like to speak directly with one of our licensed admissions staff, please call us now at (800) 646-9998 or submit the following information. If outside business hours, we will get back to you the following day.

* Required Field

×

Why is it so meaningful to give to Cumberland Heights?

Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

×