Tag Archives: Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights

Tag Archives: Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights


spiritual experiences in addiction recoverySpirituality is more than just connecting with God or a Higher Power. A lot of it also involves finding one’s purpose in the world, doing good for others, learning how to cope with difficult circumstances and feelings in healthy ways and more. Teens are so vulnerable to negative outside influences, and the spiritual component of addiction recovery can really help them find some grounding amidst the chaos.

Sometimes, spiritual components that are involved in 12-Step programs and similar services actually help teens develop a stronger sense of spirituality, even if they didn’t have one before; for example, a study published in Alcohol Treatment Quarterly assessed 195 adolescents court-referred to residential treatment. Forty percent of these teens who identified as agnostic or atheist left residential treatment identifying as spiritual or religious upon leaving. Why is this? Because teens are likely to experience so many heart filling, transformative, mind-altering moments in recovery, such as:

Learning more about what it means to be on this Earth.

  • Finding out how our actions impact the people we love and others around us
  • Recognizing how what we do affects our mind, body and spirit
  • Reducing this need to please ourselves, and finding more happiness in helping other people

Teens in the study were found to be more prosocial and were less narcissistic overall. They had greater likelihoods of abstinence, and this is probably because they felt more stable in their journey to recovery. Painter, teacher, mother and author of the novel April & Oliver Tess Callahan described the notion of addiction and spirituality as this: “Addiction is just a way of trying to get at something else. Something bigger. Call it transcendence if you want, but it’s like a rat in a maze. We all want the same thing. We all have this hole.”

Spirituality helps fill that hole. It gives ourselves and our teens, and others in addiction recovery a new chance at becoming better people – for ourselves, and for others.


Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966 and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998

Adolescent Treatment: How Recent Treatment Trends May Not Meet Patient Needs

Presentation Details:

During the presentation, we will identify current trends in adolescent substance use, explore a number of adolescent treatment modalities, and outline discrepancies between pertinent research and treatment trends.

  1. Gaining a better understanding about current trends in adolescent substance use;
  2. Exploring recent changes in adolescent treatment options around the country;
  3. Evaluate whether trendy treatment modalities align with current research on the needs of adolescents with substance use disorders

Presentation Date:

September 12, 2018 – 2 sessions; participants only need to choose 1 session. They are identical sessions.

  • 9:00AM – 12:00PM
  • 1:00PM – 4:00PM

Cost: $10.00 per attendee

REGISTER NOW

Presenter Bio: Kelly Little, MSW, LCASA

Ms. Little received her undergraduate degree in Psychology at Elon University and her Masters in Social Work at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte. Her passion for working in the field of addiction grew out of her experience with harm reduction strategies, as she worked as a college-level peer educator for 5 years. Through this experience, she researched the impact of body image on male and female college students, as well as the impact of CBT on adolescents with substance use disorders. Ms. Little has worked the treatment field since 2011, specializing in the treatment of adolescents. She has been at the Dilworth Center for 5 years and is currently responsible for adult and adolescent assessments, adolescent patient caseloads, patient and family education, and group therapy facilitation.

Original Article By: Kelly Fisher, The Tennessean | Published: April 27, 2018

On Thursday, April 26, Cumberland Heights broke ground on ARCH Academy, an addiction treatment center for teen boys slated to open in summer 2019. (Photo: Kelly Fisher, USA TODAY NETWORK – Tennessee)
On Thursday, April 26, Cumberland Heights broke ground on ARCH Academy, an addiction treatment center for teen boys slated to open in summer 2019. (Photo: Kelly Fisher, USA TODAY NETWORK – Tennessee)

Cumberland Heights, a nonprofit addiction treatment organization, broke ground on its second campus in Cheatham County on Thursday afternoon.

The upcoming facility will be used for addiction recovery in teen boys aged 14 through 18.

The 67-acre site in Pegram, once home to a bed and breakfast, will become ARCH Academy, or Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights , at 1062 Highway 70.Cumberland Heights also treats drug and alcohol addiction in adult men and women on its campus at 8283 River Road Pike in Nashville.The total cost of the project is estimated at $8.1 million, including the purchase of the property, construction, renovation, infrastructure and other costs, according to information from Cumberland Heights.

Cumberland Heights Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson said with three new builds and three renovations of current structures on the Cheatham site, the goal is to open the ARCH Academy by summer 2019.

In its first year, the new campus is expected to serve 84 teens, according to information from Cumberland Heights.

The site will include two residence halls, a dining facility, a private high school and more. The campus and adolescent program staff will offer 12-step recovery, clinical therapy and other services.

ARCH Academy Rendering - Residence Hall 2
Rendering of the New ARCH Academy Residence Hall
The location is also an “ideal environment” for hiking, mountain biking and trail rides, as well as engaging in fishing, pottery, service work and more in Pegram, a Cumberland Heights news release states.

“When you work with adolescents, they don’t respond to typical therapy, sitting across from them and just talking; you have to engage them,” Adolescent Program Director Dean Porterfield said. “You have to get them thinking, and this environment’s going to be perfect for that…It’s exciting. (It’ll) save lives.”

Crosson said the plan to open the new facility has been in the works since 2015 with plans to use it for the adolescent program, which initially launched in 1985. Since then, he said that teens accounted for approximately 10 percent of the Cumberland Heights population.

The new location will allow a length of stay of 60 days to six months; the current adolescent program only lasts up to 30 days with some extended care options, according to Cumberland Heights’ website.

ARCH Academy will also increase capacity to 30 teens from about 17 at its main campus.

Crosson said he wanted to be “good neighbors” to Cheatham, and Porterfield expressed interest in community involvement, noting that service is emphasized to those in the program.

“We want to be part of the community, (and) we want to be a resource for the community,” Porterfield said. “We also want to do our part to prevent adolescents from needing to come here, if we can do that.

“We’re just as much about prevention as we are (about) treating the kids that unfortunately have suffered from the disease of addiction.”

Matt Norton, an alumnus of Cumberland Heights, drove from Atlanta to Pegram to be part of the groundbreaking Thursday.

“I don’t think I’d be breathing if it wasn’t for Cumberland Heights and Dean (Porterfield),” he said. “I’m grateful for this place and I think the things that they’re doing is remarkable.”

Norton was 16 when he arrived at Cumberland Heights in 2012 to confront his addiction. He recalled first using drugs at 12 years old, and the problem continued until he overdosed in October 2012.

After that, he agreed to seek treatment.

“When I was at Cumberland Heights, I was really able to find myself as a person,” Norton said. “They equipped me with the tools to do the right things when I got out in order to be a part of society and not only be sober, but be a better man.”

Norton completed the program at Cumberland Heights and returned home, graduated high school, got accepted into college and landed a job.

He said he owes all of that to his treatment at Cumberland Heights. He’s hopeful that the staff and the new campus will change lives for others struggling with addiction.

“Without it, many young people (might not) be here,” Porterfield said of the adolescent program and ARCH Academy. “I think it’s important that we have a place to be able to just pull them away from the day-to-day stressors, and help them to get to know themselves and set them on a track…There’s nothing better. We save lives.”

Original Article By: Nashville Post Posted On: 04/20/2018
Cumberland Heights to build ARCH Academy in Pegram

Cumberland Heights officials led by CEO Jay Crosson will next week formally launch construction work on another facility for adolescents in alcohol and drug addiction recovery. The nonprofit will break ground Thursday in Pegram — just west of Bellevue — on ARCH Academy, a 30-bed center located on 67 acres off Highway 70.

The facility will provide therapy and programming for between 60 days and six months for adolescent boys and is expected to open in the Summer of 2019. The center, which includes a licensed high school, was designed by a team from Orcutt Winslow — the former Street Dixon Rick — that was led by Steve Rick.

Have a look at the design rendering of the 67 acre campus to be completed in Summer of 2019

ARCH Academy Rendering

PEGRAM, Tenn. (WKRN) – Jay Crosson has a big vision.

He’s CEO of Cumberland Heights, a drug and alcohol treatment center in Nashville.

Next summer, the nonprofit plans to turn a 67-acre plot of land into a recovery center for teen boys called ARCH Academy.

“They’re progressing into substances that can kill them really quick,” Crosson said. “We really need that intervention to break that cycle of addiction.”

ARCH Academy will offer a six-month recovery program for boys ages 14 to 18 battling addiction.

“We want these kids to graduate high school,” he said. “We want them to go to college.”

Up to 30 teens will live on campus which will be designed will three residence halls, a school, dining hall, and counseling room where they’ll work with therapists like Dean Porterfield.

“Anxiety, depression, trauma, we treat the whole child,” said Porterfield, director of adolescent services for Cumberland Heights.

Porterfield says about 57 percent of the teens they treat are addicted to marijuana. 10 percent are addicted to cocaine, five percent to heroin or opiates, and about 29 percent to a mix of drugs.

“It’s not uncommon for that teenager’s first experience to be at 10, 12, 13 years old,” Porterfield said.

The goal of the new center is to go more in-depth with teens, offering six months of help instead of the current program which is one to two months long.

“If we can get a longer length of stay, we can get a more solid recovery,” Crosson said.

The nonprofit will hold a groundbreaking ceremony for the teen center on Thursday, April 26.

They hope to have it up and running by summer 2019.


Copyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Come join us for the April 26, 2018 Sumner County Community Education event on adolescent & substance abuse event at Indian Lake Peninsula Church. By the time they are seniors, almost 70% of high school students will have tried alcohol, half will have taken an illegal drug, nearly 40 percent will have smoked a cigarette, and more than 20 percent will have used a prescription drug for a non- medical purpose. Join us for an educational evening with Dr. Chapman Sledge, as well as other substance abuse professionals, to learn more about youth brain development and the effects substance abuse can have during these developmental stages.

There are many reasons adolescents use these substances, including the desire for new experiences, an attempt to deal with problems or perform better in school, and simple peer pressure. Adolescents are “biologically wired” to seek new experiences and take risks, as well as to carve out their own identity.

DATE: Thursday, April 26, 2018 from 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM CDT
LOCATION: Indian Lake Peninsula Church, 235 Indian Lake Road, Hendersonville, TN 37075
COST: FREE

REGISTER HERE


About Cumberland Heights

Organizer of Sumner County Community Education
The mission of Cumberland Heights is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by drugs and alcohol. Addiction is a chronic, progressive, and potentially fatal disease. We carefully provide the highest quality care for adults, adolescents, and families who suffer from, or are affected by, this devastating disease.

By: Brett Martin
WKRN New Channel 2, Nashville

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Addiction is sweeping the country and impacting young people every day. According to the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, 25 percent of teenagers who use drugs become addicted before they turn 18.

“Drug addiction is chaotic,” said a former addict at Cumberland Heights in northwest Davidson County. Addiction is becoming far too normal for people, including teenagers. “Not all of them have gotten to that point, especially the youth, where they could be addicted, but they are definitely on a path,” said Dean Porterfield, Director of Adolescent and Young Adult Services.

There is no doubt in Alex Booth’s mind that he is a recovering addict. Booth is 28 years old now and once was hooked on pain pills. “Drinking on the weekends, partying, having fun was all that I really cared about, and it’s not realistic to have that kind of lifestyle,” said Booth. Booth came to Cumberland Heights years ago. He said without their help, he might not be alive today.

“I was on death’s door when I got to Cumberland Heights. I had a very low heart beat from being on so many depressants for so long,” said Booth. That is a scary reality for many teenagers and young adults. “I had pretty much given up and I said, ‘Do whatever.’ I’d follow any suggestion,” Booth told News 2.

A report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse says 50 percent of teens have tried alcohol and 40 percent have used some kind of illegal drug by their senior year in high school.

Porterfield said most of the teenagers coming to them are addicted to alcohol and marijuana and headed down a dark path with prescription pain pills. “We are starting to see teenagers and young adults getting into substances at a faster rate and a more lethal rate,” said Porterfield. Porterfield said the biggest challenge is making sure teenagers understand the disease and want to get help. “It’s not uncommon for someone to get to us and have the drug history, substance abuse history of someone that is much older,” explained Porterfield.

That is something Booth said was a huge hurdle for him and others who have hit rock bottom.

“I remember being a teenager and thinking that I had the entire world figured out,” Booth said.


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