Tag Archives: Adolescent Recovery

Tag Archives: Adolescent Recovery


Adolescent and Young Adult Continuum of Care: Increasing Engagement and Decreasing Trauma

The young adult population can be difficult, challenging, and rewarding to intervene on. Developmental issues, drug impact upon an undeveloped brain, and lack of impulse control potentially escalating to violence must be considered and evaluated. As Interventionists and behavioral health experts, we have learned just as much from our missteps than we have from our successes; the entire evolutionary process has shaped a new set of guidelines for safely and effectively engaging adolescents, their families/support systems, the treatment they seek and the long-term strategy for keeping everyone anchored to the most beneficial path. Without effective communication, awareness of emerging trends, and healthy engagement by everyone involved, the long-term continuum of care suffers. Our workshop will address the best ways we’ve learned to secure optimal, long-term outcomes.

This workshop is designed to help identify the differences in intervening on the young adult while effectively implementing a long-term continuum of care that engages the entire support system, while teaching participants to recognize and embrace the emerging trends they must acknowledge in order to maintain success. In addition, the participants will learn skills to handle and de-escalate conflict and liability within the intervention and throughout the continuum of care.

Learning Objectives:

• Attendees will be able to identify differences in working with the young adult/adolescent struggling with substance use and co-occurring disorders.
• Attendees will be able to describe specific techniques to assist in crisis situations that may occur during an intervention with young adults/adolescents.
• Attendees will discuss co-occurring disorders that must be considered during the intervention and in treatment placement for young adults and adolescents.

REGISTER HERE

About the Presenter:

Adolescent and Young Adult Continuum of Care

Heather Hayes is the Founder and CEO of Heather R. Hayes & Associates, Inc. She is a Master’s Level, Licensed Counselor, Board Registered Interventionist (CIP) and Certified ARISE Interventionist. Mrs. Hayes received her B.A. from Emory University and her M.Ed. from Antioch University in Counseling Psychology. A veteran of the behavioral health field, she has over 30 years of experience working with addictions and other disorders and specializes in the treatment of adolescents/ young adults, trauma, brain disorders, complex mental health issues and the full spectrum of addictive disorders.

Known as one of the country’s most prominent authorities on these topics, Ms. Hayes is a coveted speaker on the national and international stage and has been published in numerous journals, books, and other industry publications. Recognized for her comprehensive and trauma-informed approach to addiction and intervention, Ms. Hayes serves as an on-air expert and consultant for CNN and Dr. Oz and has been featured on A&E, ABC, CBS, BBC, FOX, and NBC. In addition, Ms. Hayes is a featured interventionist on the 2018 & 2019 seasons of A&E’s high profile show Intervention.

Throughout her career in addiction treatment, Mrs. Hayes has worked to connect with her clients at their greatest points of suffering. She strives to offer clients and their families a place of safety as they navigate the recovery journey and works with the entire family system to support long-term healing. As an independent interventionist, Mrs. Hayes does not have financial relationships with any treatment centers or clinicians. Over 90% of the individuals who go through the intervention process with her seek treatment.

Outside of work, Heather uses her expertise to give back to her community as a volunteer psychological profiler with the Forsyth County Sheriff’s Department Hostage Negotiation and SWAT Team.

Former Tennessee football coach Bill Battle was the keynote speaker at the Breakfast of Champions, a benefit for Arch Academy.

Former Tennessee football coach Bill Battle was the keynote speaker at the Breakfast of Champions, a benefit for Arch Academy.

Join us for our inaugural Breakfast of Champions benefiting ARCH Academy featuring Bill Battle

Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle

Event Details:

WHO: Bill Battle
WHAT: Breakfast of Champions
WHEN: Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 7:30am
WHERE: Richland Country Club; 1 Club Dr, Nashville, TN 37215

Event Tickets, Sponsorship Packages & Donation Opportunities:

Thank you to all our sponsors, donors and attendees for making this a SOLD OUT event! If you have questions please contact Rachel Williams at (615) 432-3228

Event Description:

Athletic Director Bill Battle Photo by Kent Gidley 04-03-13 Administration Mugs Athletic Director Bill Battle
Bill Battle, Athletic Director, Coach

After a successful four-year tenure as Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle transitioned into his current role as Special Assistant to the President in 2017. While leading Alabama athletics, they produced three NCAA team national championships, 11 SEC team championships in five different sports, 17 NCAA individual/relay titles; 40 Academic All-Americans; and 21 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship awardees.

Battle has had an impactful role in a career that spans more than 50 years and has encompassed some of the most historically compelling issues in collegiate athletics. From his days as a football player under head coach Paul W. “Bear” Bryant, on to assistant coaching stints at Oklahoma, Army and Tennessee, and becoming the nation’s youngest head football coach at UT.

At Tennessee, Battle played a key role in the rise of the African-American student-athlete in the South as he oversaw the development of UT’s first black quarterback. After his coaching days came to an end, he excelled in the business world by bringing the licensing of logos, slogans and other intellectual property to universities. That development brought about a major new revenue stream, enriching institutions across America.

Teen attending school while in addiction recovery

One of the most common concerns parents face today is helping their teen seek rehabilitation for substance abuse – but missing out on core foundational components of academics. The teenage years are a critical time to complete high school education, and for some families, the option is there for their teen to miss part of school and be held back. Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) Academy ensures that teens not only receive the support and resources they need to turn their lives around, but it also connects teens with classes so they don’t miss high school graduation – with nothing holding them back by the time they’re out of rehabilitation.

We can’t always control what our teens are doing behind the scenes, but we can stand up for their future. Earlier this year, Time Magazine covered the story of Marques Martinez, a teen who struggled with OxyContin, Xanax and other drug addictions – but through the help of being in a recovery school, he was able to attend classes that any other “normal” teen would – math, language arts, physical education and more – alongside other recovering peers in 12-Step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), group meetings and individual therapy sessions.

A 2018 study published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse assessed the academic and substance use outcomes of adolescents attending “recovery high schools” and, after 6 months of assessments, the authors concluded the following:

  • Teens who attend recovery high school are more likely than those who don’t to remain abstinent from drugs after 6 months post-treatment
  • Teens who partake in these types of programs are also less likely to have absenteeism concerns in school
  • Lower marijuana use levels are found in teens who attend recovery schools

ARCH Academy is surrounded by wooded hills and free from distractions – and with lengths of stays ranging from 60 days to 6 months, teen boys aged 14-18 can learn about addiction, develop life skills, build their self-esteem and more while attending both school and rehabilitation. If your teen needs help, don’t wait any longer to seek out treatment. This period of their lives could have a lasting impact on their future – and having the right people nearby could make a world of difference.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Boy healing in addiction recoveryOur adolescent years are often such a confusing time as our mind, body and spirit is developing, and substance abuse can only further complicate this. Research shows that the adolescent brain lacks critical thinking skills, and teens are at heightened risk to pursue risky endeavors because their brain is still developing these areas that would otherwise help them consider the consequences of these actions. Not only is the adolescent brain still developing during this time, but they’re more impressionable; peer pressure accounts for a huge part of substance use among teens, and their environment – both in the community and at home – can also weigh heavily on their likelihood for substance abuse.

Some adolescents abuse substances because they feel alone in the issues their facing, while others are looking for a sense of direction, and substances may seem to resolve that issue temporarily. The utmost healing occurs for adolescents who experiencing love, community and service in a holistic aspect – their mind, body and spirit.

How Addiction Affects the Mind, Body and Spirit

Mind

DrugFree.org emphasizes that in addition to the mood swings, the brain develops in an uneven pattern, from the back of the brain to the front. Because of this, adolescents struggle with reasoning and impulses, which makes them more susceptible to addiction. The brain is made up of billions of nerve cells, and the signals that get passed between these nerve cells are sent through neurotransmitters – some of which send signals of pain or pleasure. When adolescents abuse substances, a surge of dopamine (a “feel-good” chemical) floods the brain, and, over time, the adolescent brain becomes dependent on these substances – and if a teen stops substance abuse, they’re likely to experience irritability, tiredness and other withdrawal symptoms.

Body

The body has become used to these substances, and a number of physical effects may be visible, such as:

  • Noticeable tiredness
  • Constricted pupils
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Red, flushed color to the face
  • And more

Many parents may begin to recognize a different “smell” on their adolescent or in their bedroom, as some teens may attempt to “cover up” their substance abuse with sprays or perfumes.

Spirit

During this stage in adolescence, youth are still learning about who they are and how they fit into society. Substances can mask some of this development by leading many teens to continue down a path that significantly disrupts their happiness and health in the future; one individual shared his story of struggling with addiction as a teen via DrugAbuse.gov. Here is an excerpt from his story:

“When you’re growing up and you’re falling into a chaotic pit of mental health issues, you can often feel alone. You definitely feel like an outcast. You feel like you’re the only person in the world who’s going through this.”

Spirituality is a topic that goes undiscussed in many families, but treatment that focuses on this – as well as the mind and body – can truly transform an adolescent’s life.

Spirituality and Adolescent Recovery

A 2014 study published in the journal Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly found that when spirituality is addressed in adolescent treatment, they’re more likely to not only relate to a more spiritual side of themselves but they’re also likely to remain abstinent after treatment as well. Rather than feeling as though they’re the only one in the world struggling with the issues they face, teens experience more prosocial behaviors when spirituality is addressed, such as:

  • Exhibiting greater care for others
  • Volunteerism
  • Feeling part of a community
  • Experiencing greater clarity of their purpose in life
  • And more

Spirituality can be uplifted in a multitude of ways, including 12-Step programs. In 2017, researchers compared 10 sessions of motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive behavioral therapy to 12-Step facilitation for 59 adolescents in addiction recovery. After 3, 6 and 9 months of assessing the results between adolescent groups, the researchers found that 12-Step facilitation helped teens remain abstinent longer – a sincere concern that many families have while their teen is in recovery.

As The Association for Addiction Professionals notes, spiritual concerns (such as feeling alone in the world, lacking purpose or having trouble caring for others) cannot be fixed with substances. Teens learn that becoming part of a community, helping others and receiving support in return, they can heal from addiction.

Seek Help Today

Don’t wait any longer to get your adolescent help for substance abuse. Recovery is right around the corner, and with a team of healthcare professionals who truly care, they’ll be on their way towards happier, healthier living. Call Cumberland Heights today.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Adolescent benefiting from 12-Step programsPrevious research has shown that treatment is best when it’s integrated – because everyone has unique histories, interests and learning processes. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explains that comprehensive, personalized treatment works best for adolescents in addiction recovery and this often takes place amongst several components:

  • Behavioral therapies – such as counseling, psychotherapy, group therapy, etc.
  • Activities – such as horseback riding, rock climbing, canoeing and others
  • Group meals – so that adolescents can get to know other teens who are recovering
  • School assistance – which allows adolescents recovering to continue their education and not get behind
  • 12-Step programs – to provide a community in which adolescents can become a part of

12-Step programs can be incredibly effective for teens in recovery because it gives them an opportunity to connect with others while following a structured path towards healing. In 12-Step programs, teens can rebalance and restore their mental, physical and spiritual health; a 2015 study published by a student in the Harvard University Extension School found that greater involvement in 12-Step programs leads to lengthened sobriety. The 12-Step program is often supplemental to other forms of treatment, and it’s these various approaches to recovery that give a person a more personalized experience.

While being promoted to live a drug-free lifestyle, adolescents in recovery can work through deep-rooted issues in psychotherapy. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), for instance, is a therapy approach that helps individuals uncover negative thought processes and replace them with more positive, meaningful ones. Group therapy sessions – aside from the group discussions explored in 12-Step Programs – can help teens explore greater issues that have been at play in their lives – whether it relates to friends, home life, school, mental health concerns or something else.

One person shared their personal experience with a 12-Step program via Recovery and Me. Here is an excerpt from their story:

“I learned about the power of connection between one recovering person and another; where sharing experiences, strength and hope with each other provide examples and inspiration to continue ‘one day at a time’.”

The strength garnered from 12-Step programs, in addition to other treatment modalities, can only serve to strengthen an adolescent’s journey to recovery. The period of adolescence is already marked by a rollercoaster of emotions and development; teens can find strength in a safe community found through Cumberland Heights’ ARCH Academy.

 Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

How heavy drinking affects teen’s brainsAs the adolescent brain is developing, it’s extremely vulnerable to outside circumstances. The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry explains that the prefrontal cortex is what we use for reasoning, but this does not develop until later on in life. As the brain is not yet fully developed, youth are less likely to employ critical thinking when faced with risky situations, peer pressure and more – which makes heavy drinking a major concern for many parents and family members alike. If your teen is seeking helping for substance abuse, you may be fearing what the effect of this could have on their brain.

A 2015 study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry sought to explore this very question by analyzing 134 adolescents, 75 whom transitioned into heavy drinking and 59 who remained light drinkers and non-drinkers over the next 3.5 years. MRI scans were conducted two to six times between the ages of 12 and 24 for these adolescents, and they were then followed up for the next 8 years. These were the results from the study:

  • Adolescents who had engaged in heavy drinking showed accelerated gray matter reduction, which contains regions of the brain that help with muscle control, emotions, speech, decision making, hearing, self-control and more
  • Both male and female adolescents showed similar results when it came to these effects

While the adolescent stage is a crucial one for learning and development, and while heavy drinking can certainly reduce optimal functioning in several areas of the brain, teens can recover if treatment is sought early and is maintained. As Time Magazine has previously stated, youth who show problems with substance at age 18 are at even higher risk for developing a full-blown addiction by age 25. Help your teen seek the treatment they need right away.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Teen boys e-cigarettesWith the rise of e-cigarettes over the past 15 years, teens have become more accustomed to smoking e-cigarettes and other vaping devices. Local advertisements are a key driver of teen use, as the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) states that 7 out of 10 teens are exposed to e-cigarette ads. Since e-cigarette companies don’t have to report their ingredients, our teens may be receiving more nicotine than they think. In fact, recent studies show that 66% of teens believe there’s just flavoring in their e-cigarettes; the unfortunate reality, however, is that there’s more than that – and it may be prepping our teens to start smoking traditional cigarettes, too.

A 2017 study published in the journal Pediatrics found that e-cigarette usage is an over 30% of high school teens, compared to the single digit numbers that were displayed a few years ago. The authors of the study noted that teens are at an increased risk of vulnerability for traditional cigarette use if the following occur:

  • Risk-taking
  • Impulsiveness
  • Negative affect
  • Low parental support
  • Surrounding oneself with peers who tend to get into trouble
  • E-cigarette use

Furthermore, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine conducted a national sample of 694 adolescent participants ages 16 to 26 years old to explore just what makes one person more susceptible to traditional cigarette use over another. After a year of follow up with these participants, they found that 11 of 16 e-cigarette users had eventually moved to traditional cigarettes; so far, evidence is showing that e-cigarettes aren’t as harmless as they’re made out to be.

If your teen is struggling with substance abuse, speak with someone from the Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights center today. Recovery is right around the corner – be sure they seek help as soon as possible.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

How attitude influences teenagers thoughts towards alcoholMany of us can remember vague memories from our teenage years, but we may have some difficulties recalling our thought processes at the time. It seems that once we’re well into adulthood, we have trouble understanding what our own teens are going through – and this can make it more difficult to work with them when it comes to preventing substance abuse. Teenage years are some of the most vulnerable years, because the teen brain is still developing. The better we can understand how teens are thinking, the more capable we will be of working with them to ensure they know what to do in situations that could place them at risk for addiction.

A 2016 study published in the journal Health Psychology followed 868 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 years old for three years. That found that implicit attitudes actually predicted future drinking behavior one year later; the researchers also found that if the adolescents’ parents approved of drinking, their implicit attitude was more likely to favorably view drinking, too. This leads us to one key question: what exactly is implicit attitude?

The dictionary defines it as, “Evaluations that occur without conscious awareness towards an attitude, object, or the self.” When we hold an implicit attitude, it’s not something that we’re directly aware of, but it is shaped by our environment and experiences. If implicit attitudes are having such a strong impact on our teens, how can we influence those attitudes as parents, family members and community members?

A 2017 study titled, “A Different View on Parenting: Automatic and Explicit Parenting Cognitions in Adolescent’s Drinking Behavior” emphasized that too often, parents underestimate the extent of their teens’ drinking behavior. By showing our teens responsible drinking and expressing our disapproval of binge drinking, we may influence our teens’ perceptions of alcohol.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Boy experiencing peer pressureA few years ago, a young lady shared her experience of peer pressure through DrugFree.org. She explained that growing up, her parent struggled with alcoholism – and between that and her parent’s divorce, she dealt with a lot of psychological turmoil. This young woman went on to explain that since she didn’t have the coping skills she really needed to get through some of the hardships she faced, she turned to her peers for validation. She stated,

“I wanted to fit in and feel better about myself…As a teenager who was already full of apprehension and anxiety, getting caught up and swept away by peer pressure was just another high.”

It’s not uncommon for teens and adolescents to go become vulnerable to peer pressure, especially as they are still trying to figure out who they are. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Adolescence noted that popularity in school can also influence teens to drink and abuse substances – especially if that means they will become “cool” or otherwise accepted. Since the teen brain is still developing during these stages of life, how can we as parents, educators and community members support our youth?

In 2018, the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry suggested a number of actions we can take:

  • Teaching our teens to be more assertive in resisting dangerous activities
  • Helping our youth develop more self-confidence, so they do not need to seek out this type of validation from their peers
  • Encouraging open and honest communication from our adolescents, so that future problems can be prevented
  • Getting to know our children’s’ parents and friends
  • Coming up with “back-up” plans for our teens if they’d like to get out of risky situations

If you have a teen who is showing signs of substance abuse, ensure they seek the help they need, right now. Recovery is right around the corner, and it could change the outlook on the rest of their lives.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.


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