Tag Archives: Arch Recovery

Tag Archives: Arch Recovery


Former Tennessee football coach Bill Battle was the keynote speaker at the Breakfast of Champions, a benefit for Arch Academy.

Former Tennessee football coach Bill Battle was the keynote speaker at the Breakfast of Champions, a benefit for Arch Academy.

Join us for our inaugural Breakfast of Champions benefiting ARCH Academy featuring Bill Battle

Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle

Event Details:

WHO: Bill Battle
WHAT: Breakfast of Champions
WHEN: Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 7:30am
WHERE: Richland Country Club; 1 Club Dr, Nashville, TN 37215

Event Tickets, Sponsorship Packages & Donation Opportunities:

Thank you to all our sponsors, donors and attendees for making this a SOLD OUT event! If you have questions please contact Rachel Williams at (615) 432-3228

Event Description:

Athletic Director Bill Battle Photo by Kent Gidley 04-03-13 Administration Mugs Athletic Director Bill Battle
Bill Battle, Athletic Director, Coach

After a successful four-year tenure as Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle transitioned into his current role as Special Assistant to the President in 2017. While leading Alabama athletics, they produced three NCAA team national championships, 11 SEC team championships in five different sports, 17 NCAA individual/relay titles; 40 Academic All-Americans; and 21 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship awardees.

Battle has had an impactful role in a career that spans more than 50 years and has encompassed some of the most historically compelling issues in collegiate athletics. From his days as a football player under head coach Paul W. “Bear” Bryant, on to assistant coaching stints at Oklahoma, Army and Tennessee, and becoming the nation’s youngest head football coach at UT.

At Tennessee, Battle played a key role in the rise of the African-American student-athlete in the South as he oversaw the development of UT’s first black quarterback. After his coaching days came to an end, he excelled in the business world by bringing the licensing of logos, slogans and other intellectual property to universities. That development brought about a major new revenue stream, enriching institutions across America.

adolescent 12-Step programsAdolescents face unique challenges, because they are learning who they are alongside a number of changes occurring within and around them. They’re trying to find their path and sometimes that path leads them down the road of addiction and recovery. Even at this young age, it’s absolutely possible for teens to seek help, recover and go on to live happy and successful lives. 12-Step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) have been shown to provide a lot of social support for those in recovery and teens in particular really benefit from the spiritual and “giving” component associated with these types of programs.

A 2016 study published in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America involved the review of 10 studies with continuing care for treatment of adolescents. They found that the social support derived from 12-Step programs related to adolescents specifically really helped teens as they continued to work towards recovery maintenance. What type of teens would benefit most from this?

As stated on The Fix, associate director John F. Kelly at the Massachusetts General Hospital stated, “Starting an on-site NA or AA young person’s meeting is another good idea. Not all youth will be motivated to attend, but the more severely substance-involved ones will be more likely to give meetings a try and these are the ones most likely to benefit.”

What about teens who aren’t severely at risk for relapse, but could still benefit from 12-Step based programs? Researchers from around the United States have suggested a combination of continuing care techniques along with 12-Step participation, and these 2 additions have actually been shown to increase engagement in the program:

  • Motivational enhancement therapy (MET)
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)

Recovery doesn’t stop after formalized treatment. Support your adolescent by giving them the means to continue seeking recovery maintenance groups and help them remember just how far they’ve come. Adolescents face significant emotional and social upheavals as they try to navigate their way to adulthood and both residential and after-care maintenance could truly help guide the way.


Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966 and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

teen addiction recoveryOne of the hardest circumstances to go through is seeing a loved one – let alone a teen – struggle with addiction. Even parents who have consistently been by their child’s side may find that drugs enter their life one way or another. When this happens, it feels as though the world has literally turned upside down – and as painful as this is, it’s a process of understanding the reality.

Families go through so much change when addiction is involved; sometimes family members’ roles change and other times, emotional, physical and financial tolls take place. It’s hard for family members to understand why their loved one would choose to abuse substances and while there are a number of reasons why drugs were tried in the first place, it can become a disease that takes over the brain. Once addiction has developed, even the brightest, most positive teen could find themselves making decisions they wouldn’t normally make, such as:

  • Lying
  • Cheating
  • Stealing
  • Saying mean/hurtful things
  • Isolating themselves
  • Picking up a new group of friends
  • And more

Moving Forward

If your teen is in addiction recovery, there are a lot of steps that you and your family will need to take in order to heal and move forward, both individually and collectively. First and foremost, one of the hardest things for families to do is to accept the reality that their teen is struggling with addiction. According to DrugFree.org, one parent shared his own battle with acknowledging the truth of his son’s addiction. He stated, “My learning is: until you understand the truth, you cannot find peace within yourself or really be able to help your child who is struggling with addiction. Accepting the truth and proceeding from there, allows you to help both yourself and your child.”

Knowledge is power and understanding the truth means that you now have some power on your end to ensure that your teen is adequately supported throughout recovery and that you take steps towards your own healing, health and happiness. There are a number of things that can be done, such as:

  1. Individual therapy – as a parent, sibling or extended relative to your loved one, you’re going to experience a lot of pain. It’s devastating to find out that a teen has been abusing drugs and you may transition through a number of emotions, including depression, anger, guilt and more. Individual therapy gives you the one-on-one space that you need to work through these emotions, so you can effectively grieve; from there, you can process what you’re feeling and move forward in a healthy, productive way.
  2. Family therapy– as a book published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) emphasizes, the family system can become interrupted when addiction is involved; communication within and between family members may become unbalanced especially as difficult emotions are still being processed.
  3. Al-Anon Groups – these are mutual support groups that guide families and loved ones through the recovery process by using the twelve steps. It can be transformational to hear others who are going through similar experiences, as it reminds us that we’re not alone. By giving up our need for control, we can recognize that all of the power goes to God or another Higher Power and all we can change are our own attitudes and behaviors.

Supporting Your Teen

As families learn a lot more about addiction and what their child is going through, they tend to gain a bigger perspective on life. Suddenly new questions arise, such as the meaning of life, the significance of our relationships with others and what it means to love someone unconditionally. Recovery is a long road and it’s hard on everyone – but if your teen has made it into rehabilitation, they have taken the first step towards their happiness and health. From here, you can walk with your teen as they navigate this new journey to become stronger, wiser and more equipped to deal with the challenges of life – and so will you.

According to a study conducted by researchers from the NACoA, an organization aimed at promoting support for children affected by family addiction, 300 recovering adolescents and young adults were surveyed to find out exactly what they wish they could have received more of from their parents. They talked about addiction, its effects on their families and more. The researchers asked this specific question:  “If you were a parent, what would you do differently?”

These were some of their responses:

  • “I would have shown up and been around more.”
  • “I wouldn’t be overbearing, and, when my kids were upset, I would just listen instead of try to fix them.”
  • “Tell my child how special they are to me and how they are loved.”
  • “I would not blame my kids for all the problems in our family.”

Some of these responses are pretty devastating to hear and while as family members we can’t always be perfect, we have to remember to be more mindful and present in our kids’ lives. These are pathways to connection and the more love and nurturement and security we provide them, the more likely they are to thrive.


Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966 and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998


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