Tag Archives: Community

Tag Archives: Community


Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Vaping, Juuling are the new Smoking for High School Kids

Flavored e-cigarette products and trendy new vaping devices like Juul are luring teenagers away from smoked cigarettes but keeping them hooked on nicotine, federal health officials said Thursday.

The latest tobacco use survey shows a drop in the number of high school students who use tobacco, from 24 percent in 2011 to about 20 percent in 2017.
The drop could potentially have been bigger. E-cigarettes were barely known in 2011, so virtually all teen tobacco users were smokers. Now, just under 13 percent of high school students smoke cigarettes.

Almost all of the rest are vaping a CDC Survey found. Join us for an educational discussion about current trends and what to do if you think your child may be vaping or juuling.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: Sage Hill Counseling 400 Overbeck Lane, Suite 202, Nashville
DATE: September 27, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 8:00PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT OUR SPEAKERS:

Chandler Ross, MSW
Chandler grew up in Nashville and then moved to the southwest. He lived in Arizona for 12 years working in hospitality and IT sales. After finishing undergrad at the Northern Arizona University, Chandler moved back to Nashville to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Tennessee for Social Work. Since then, Chandler has worked for Cumberland Heights in admissions and intake, Big Brother Big Sister as a family interviewer, and the Oasis Center for Youth as a family therapist. Chandler has a heart for adolescents and young people experiencing grief, trauma, substance abuse issues, depression and anxiety and feeling disconnected from family. Outside of therapy, Chandler enjoys gardening, cooking, road trips in the south and writing silly stories on the internet.

Amara Schweinberg, MA
Amara currently serves as the Adolescent Admissions and Outreach Specialist for Cumberland Heights. She provides assessments for the adolescent population and is also vital in the admissions process in regards to tours, assessments, insurance authorization, and phone screenings. In addition, Amara also serves in an outreach role by marketing to the local and regional communities for the current Adolescent Program and the new adolescent recovery center, ARCH Academy opening in 2019. Amara joined the Cumberland Heights team in 2012.

Amara has served as an Administrative Assistant in the Intake Department at Cumberland Heights before advancing to a Senior Admissions Counselor. She obtained her Master’s Degree in Counseling at Trevecca Nazarene University and completed her internship in the Counselor Department of a local private high school.

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Addiction Effects the Entire Family

Addiction is a family disease that stresses the family to the breaking point, impacts the stability of the home, the family’s unity, mental health, physical health, finances, and overall family dynamics. Join us to learn about how your family might be effected and what you can do to support yourself, your family and your loved ones who may be struggling with substance use.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: Bellevue Family YMCA – 8101 TN-100 Nashville, TN 37212
DATE: July 26, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 8:00PM

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ABOUT OUR SPEAKER:

Meet Our Speaker Kristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland HeightsKristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland Heights. Kristy has been a counselor for 15 years working mostly in addiction treatment but also began her career working in community mental health. Kristy received her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern Indiana. Kristy is trained in EMDR. Kristy has worked with children, adolescents, young adults and adults providing individual and family therapy. Kristy moved to Nashville from Indiana in 2008, joining the Cumberland Heights team in 2012.

Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights invites to join us for an experiential activity and a day of fellowship experiencing emotions in a dynamic way! The Alumni Ropes Day consists of both low and high rope elements and processes. These experiential activities place the participant in scenarios, often outside of comfort zones, that allow emergence of a core truth about themselves. Concepts of powerlessness, surrender, keeping it simple, honesty, courage, community support, trust, faith, and many others emerge. The participant is able to draw parallels and metaphors from their experience then transfer it to practical application to their recovery journey.

What: Recover Trust: Alumni Ropes Day (Boxed Lunch Included)
When: Saturday, April 21 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (DATE CHANGED DUE TO RAIN)
Where: Cumberland Heights Alumni Pavilion
Details: Must RSVP below by April 18 (limited space, register your spot now!)

Please wear comfortable clothing and closed toe shoes. Boxed lunches will be provided.
All participants will sign a waiver and must be over the age of 18

This event is always a blast, be sure you register early! Plus check out some photos from our past years Alumni Ropes Day.

Contributor Note: Aftercare Director Johnny Rosen, has been with Cumberland Heights since 1996. Along with serving the Alumni of Cumberland Heights, Johnny also supports technical needs, from recording the Sunday services to assisting in all sound, lighting and video projects on campus and for Cumberland Heights events. His son, J.J. Rosen, followed in his tech-savvy footsteps and founded the computer consulting business Atiba, where Johnny helps out on a part-time basis.

By: Joel Stinnett – Reporter, Nashville Business Journal

Aftercare Director Johnny Rosen, has been an active part of Cumberland Heights since 1996. His son, J.J. Rosen, followed in his tech-savvy footsteps and founded the computer consulting business Atiba, where Johnny helps out on a part-time basis.

Some people find their passion at a young age; for others it takes some time to find their path. For Atiba founder and Chairman J.J. Rosen, the latter was true. Rosen graduated from Vanderbilt University in 1992 and took a job with the district attorney general in Nashville. As the child support coordinator tasked with collecting more revenue, he noticed none of the offices around the state had computer systems. Rosen began to study how to code and eventually wrote software to help collect child support. Later, a consulting firm hired by the state leaned heavily on Rosen to install updates to his software. In response, Rosen started computer consulting business Atiba. Twenty-five years later, Rosen is still living his passion.

Your father was an entrepreneur — what did you learn from him?

My dad was in the music business. So, I sort of always had in my mind that I would work for myself at some point. In the ’70s my dad built a recording studio in the back of an 18-wheeler truck. It was used for recording live concerts and radio shows. So, I was a roadie in the summers for my dad. That was good for me because it taught me work ethic. It’s really not very much fun, it’s hard physical labor, and at the time I did not like it. But in hindsight it was probably a healthy thing to do. Also, my grandparents opened the first store in The Mall at Green Hills. … My grandmother on the other side was one of the first interior designers in Nashville. So, I had it in my mind from a young age I would do my own thing at some point. I just wasn’t quite sure what.

When you were growing up, you didn’t have an idea of what you wanted to do when you got older?

No; I wish I did. One of my best friends since we were little kids is a successful oncologist. I was jealous of him because he always knew he wanted to be a doctor. … I didn’t really have a passion until I got out of college.

What advice would you give recent college graduates who have yet to find their passion?

I would try to view your first job as a learning investment. Don’t worry about the salary. Try to find something where the main value is helping you learn what you like, and learn a skill. … When I got out of college with a general psychology degree, I couldn’t walk into a place and be like, “Hey, I have this degree, now I’m valuable.” I really had nothing to offer. No matter if you are into tech, a photographer, a musician or whatever it is, I think having some sort of trade is valuable.

How has Nashville’s tech scene changed since you started Atiba?

It was a really small community in the old days. There wasn’t, I don’t think, the opportunity there is now. Nashville’s growth has created more startup activity and been a catalyst for more tech activity. … Back when we were getting going there were only a few large companies that could support the tech community. Now, we are a hot spot, not just for health care or music, but for everything.

How can Nashville attract or create more tech talent?

We are definitely attracting more people to live here, but we can cultivate more homegrown talent by starting with middle schools and high schools. If you get out of high school and you can code, you can go ahead and get a job making an OK living right away. There are not many jobs like that.

What piece of outdated technology do you miss the most?

One is the phonograph, [one of] which I bought. I like the old-school sound of records playing. … The other one, and this is going way back — my dad had a briefcase phone. This is before the cell phone, and you had to call into a tower. The reason I miss that is the coolness factor, and at the time it was unique.

What is your favorite city to visit?

New Orleans …As the world has become smaller and more connected, it feels like some places are the same no matter where you go. But there are a few cities that are completely different and have a whole different vibe. Like New York, you go there and it’s like a different country. I find that same feeling with New Orleans.

You are a drummer; who is your favorite band?

The Meters …They are a musician’s band; musicians love them. They played this heavy New Orleans funk influenced by Mardi Gras and Indian beats.

Would you rather your two sons grow up to become musicians or software developers?

Ideally they could do both. Of course, I want them to do whatever is best for them and there is no pressure for them to go into the same field as me. If I had to choose, I would like them to pursue music so that they can make their own way.


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