Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment

Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment


Fishing is an iconic American pastime. There is nothing like spending the day by the water with your friends and family, casting a line and enjoying the great outdoors. But did you know you can get more than a killer catch from a day of fishing? Fishing has benefits for your physical and mental health as well.

Join us for an informative and interactive session about the physical and mental health benefits of fishing and how you can apply this to you and your patients’ treatment process.

 

Facilitated by:

Kenny Davis, CPRS & Paul Citro, MBA, LADAC, NCACI, QCS, SAP

 

1.5 CEs available.

Course Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to take this skill of mindful fishing into their lives and apply it to their recovery and spiritual journey as well as the journeys of their patients.
  • Participants will gain understanding that mindfulness, spirituality and gratitude are something practiced, not just a feeling.
  • Participants will gain knowledge of how/when/where to implement this activity during the treatment process and how to process with patients.

 

REGISTER HERE

Building a Treatment Organization Through Ethical Business Development Standards and Practices

As the addiction treatment field wrestles with the uncertain impact of COVID-19, ethical business development and outreach practices are more important than ever to ensure that patients find appropriate placement, resources and treatment services to meet their needs. Join us for this presentation focusing on ethics in business development practices in a changing treatment landscape.

When: Friday, May 1, 2020 at 1:00 p.m EST/ 12:00 p.m. CST

THIS IS A ZOOM MEETING- You will receive Zoom ID Information closer to the event date. 

REGISTER HERE

Who Should Attend: Business Development and Marketing professionals in the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Industry

Course Overview: Through the use of case studies, this presentation will identify key areas of learning for business development professionals that support ethical growth of personal business brand and represented company, including how to choose like-minded professional partners, how to grow referral channels, the different between ethical versus legal and how both impact brand trust, how to identify an ethical compensation structure for business development staff, and how to appropriately market online through digital media.

Course Objectives:

– Identify how to organically grow professional referral relationships that support long-term growth and sustainability.

– Define ethical versus legal.

– Understand when to admit and when to refer out: How clinically appropriate and inappropriate admits impact the bottom line and brand.

Course Outcomes:

1- How does choosing like-minded professional partners impact the organizational and business development professional’s personal brand, trust and bottom line?

2- What is the importance of mentoring, support, oversight and supervision in the role of new business development and marketing professionals in the field, and how does that lead to positive or negative outcomes for patients and families?

3- How important is it for a marketing professional to understand and access a potential patient’s clinical needs?

About the Presenters:

Alex Denstman started working at Ashley in 2009 as a Patient Care Coordinator and has since held several roles including Director of Alumni Services, Director of Clinical Outreach, and Vice President of Business Development. In his current role as Senior Vice President, Chief Growth Officer, he now oversees Intake, Clinical Outreach, Utilization Review, Patient Care Coordination, Communications, Alumni, and Development. Alex received his undergraduate degree from University of Baltimore in Health Systems Management with honors and is now pursuing his Master in Business Administration from University of Maryland Global College. His association with Ashley started in 2003 when, at age 20, he was a patient in our program. Alex has remained in recovery and is an active member of the local recovery community. He is passionate about using his personal experiences and 15+ year’s background in the industry to help ensure that patients, families, and referring professionals feel cared for and appropriately served at the intake and discharge stages of treatment and beyond.

Zach Snitzer is the co-owner and Director of Business Development at Maryland Addiction Recovery Center and is responsible for the business development, marketing, branding, public relations, communications, and social media strategies of the organization. Zach is a graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications and Marketing. Prior to his career working in addiction treatment, Zach worked in marketing, communications and public relations in both the sports and media industries. Due to his own personal journey of recovery, Zach had a vision of bringing world class long-term treatment to his home area that viewed addiction as a chronic illness and offered a continuum of care that truly aided in healing patients and families with a path of sustainable recovery. In addition to his duties at MARC, Zach serves on the Board of Directors of Valley/Bridge House, the D.C.-Maryland-Virginia Professional Liaison’s Association (DMV-PLA) leadership committee, and the National Advisory Board for the National Conference on Addiction Disorders (NCAD.)

Tom Walker holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and is a Certified Substance Abuse Counselor and Qualified Mental Health Professional in the state of Virginia. He has been working in the substance use disorders and behavioral health field since 1999. Tom spent 10+ years providing direct care to clients and families as a counselor prior to beginning business development work with regional and national healthcare organizations and co-founding Encore in 2016. In addition, Tom has been in long-term recovery and actively engaged in the local recovery community since 1997. His work and personal recovery have been primarily focused in the Washington DC region, and as a native to the area, Tom is passionate about ensuring that the individuals and families living here have access to the highest quality of care possible.

This workshop aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shifts in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and will learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

This presentation aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shift in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Agenda:

8:00-8:45 Registration Opens (Coffee served & Continental Breakfast)

8:45-9:00 Welcome to Attendees and CE announcements

9:00-10:30 The Blessings : Judith Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT

10:30-10:45 Break

10:45-12:15 The Neurobiology of Trauma : Mandy Baker, MS, LCDC

12:15-1:15 Buffet Lunch

1:15-2:45 Collaboration Model for Substance Use Disorder: Dr. Gregory Boris

2:45-3:00 Break

3:00-4:30 The Science of Measurement in Substance Use Disorder Treatment : Nicholas Hayes, PhD

4:30-4:45 Closing, Evaluations

Total Hours: 6.00 CE’s

 

 

Continuing Education

This program is co-sponsored by BRC Recovery and The Institute for Continuing Education. The program offers 6.00 contact hours, with full attendance required.

There is no additional fee for making application for continuing education credit. Application forms and other CE materials will be available on site. CE verifications are mailed to attendees within 30-days following the event. If you have questions regarding the program, continuing education learning objectives, presenters, agenda, contact The Institute at: 800-557-1950 / email: instconted@aol.com

NOTE: To receive continuing education credit, applicants must complete all CE materials, sign in/out at designated locations, and submit an evaluation form for the sessions attended.

NOTE: It is the responsibility of the attendee to determine if CE credit offered by The Institute for Continuing Education meets the regulations of their state licensing/certification board, including the Ethics Workshops scheduled.

Psychology: The Institute for Continuing Education is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Counseling/ MFT: Counselors will be provided with a Certificate of Attendance.

Social Work: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized as an approved provider of continuing education by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners, Provider 1416, expiration 4/30/20.

Non-Credit Events: Registration, breaks, and lunch

Skills Level: This program is open to mental health professionals of all skill levels.

Instructional Methodology: May include lecture, demonstration,  and audio/visual.

ADA: If you have special needs, please contact Ruth Ann Rigby at: Rrigby@brcrecovery.com

MCCME: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the MS State Medical Association and BRC Recovery. The MS State Medical Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The MS State Medical Association designates this live activity for a maximum of 5.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

About This Course:

WHEN: Wednesday, February 26 & Thursday, February 27
TIME: 8:00AM – 5:00AM
WHERE: Cumberland Heights River Road Campus (8283 River Road Pike, Nashville)
COST: *Includes Breakfast and Lunch on All Training Days

$75 – December 25th – January 25th (Early Bird Registration)
$120 – January 26th – February 14th

Who Should Attend: Anyone interested in sharpening their DBT skills, you do NOT have to have previously attended the Part 1 training to take this course, however, if you are preparing to teach DBT in the future, you will need to attend the first part of the DBT training series.

This course is designed to introduce students to the skills training aspects of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). It includes introductions to the four categories of DBT Skills. Students are introduced to the strategies and styles of running a DBT Skills class.  They also participate in an actual DBT class, including completing homework, completing skills worksheets, etc. to provide an immersive and ‘hands-on’ experience. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on the importance of comprehensive, culturally-sensitive, individualized assessment and intervention.

 

16 CEUs awarded, NAADAC and NBCC approved.

REGISTER NOW

Course Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Refresh their knowledge of the foundations of DBT.
  2. Gain basic knowledge of DBT skills.
  3. Gain skills and stylistic strategies to conduct DBT Skills classes.
  4. Appreciate the experience of Skills class participants by participating in an actual DBT skills class.
  5. Understand how to individualize Skills for respective clients through observing role-plays/demonstrations and participating in ‘hands-on’ practice.
  6. Conduct basic behavioral analysis and suggest more effective behaviors
  7. Understand how to integrate Dialectics into DBT practice
  8. Know the four categories of DBT Skills and the skills therein.
  9. Participate in mindfulness activities.

Course Expectations

  1. Student Expectations: Students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior, which means: attending class; arriving to and leaving class at the scheduled time; informing the instructor when leaving class early (please do so minimally), turning cell phones to silent, vibrate, or off; not texting, emailing, tweeting, etc. in class; coming to class alone and without children, family, and friends who are not registered in the course; returning to class on-time after breaks; coming prepared to participate in class discussion; asking questions and/or giving feedback; limiting the use of laptop computers (with the exception of taking class notes) and other electronic devices; engaging in courteous communication with instructors and peers inside and outside of the classroom; and showing respect for others’ opinions. If your use of electronic devices is distracting to anyone in the classroom, including the instructor, you will be asked to turn off the device and/or leave the classroom. When communicating with instructors or peers, in person or electronically, please be aware that standards of professional behavior apply. Integral to higher education is the exchange of ideas, which may include new, controversial and/or diverse ideas, and sometimes we will not agree with the ideas we encounter in readings, discussions, or class presentations. However, under all circumstances, we will treat others with respect and act professionally. Students are responsible for their own learning and contributing to a larger learning community in the classroom. It is imperative that students be present in order to learn valuable skills for social work practice. If a student misses three (3) or more classes, he/she risks not passing the course.
  2. Instructor Expectations: Instructor is expected to demonstrate professional behavior, which means: attending class; arriving to and leaving class at the scheduled time; informing students of changes to the course syllabus; informing students of changes to the class schedule; providing students with classroom time to work on course assignments; providing clear expectations on course assignments; providing clear and concise feedback on course assignments; returning assignments to students in a timely manner, and replying promptly to e-mail. Integral to higher education is the exchange of ideas, which may include new, controversial and/or diverse ideas, and sometimes we will not agree with the ideas we encounter in readings, discussions, or class presentations. However, under all circumstances, we will treat others with respect and act professionally.
    1. Course Assignments: All students will be given a homework assignment which is due the second day of the training. No extension requests will be approved on assignments that are due within the next 48 hours.
    2. Incompletes: All participants are required to attend the entire 2-day course in order to receive full CE’s.
    3. Safety: As part of professional education, students will be engaging with the community. As such, this may present some risks. Sound choices and caution may lower risks inherent to the profession. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and ensure personal safety. Students should notify the appropriate authority regarding any safety concerns.
    4. Confidentiality: Personal disclosure is not an expectation or requirement of this course. However, it may be appropriate for students to share information during class as it relates to learning about a particular topic. Students are expected to adhere to all professional standards of confidentiality during the semester.

At the end of the training, students will have the opportunity to evaluate the course and the instructor using the official University of Utah course and instructor evaluation. This course is based on the premise that much of our learning is from one another.  We each bring our experiences, knowledge, and analyses to realms of mutual learning and reflections.  Such learning requires the student to constructively participate.

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“Am I an addict?” is an extremely common question for those who find themselves behaving differently or making uncharacteristic choices in the name of drugs and alcohol. Individuals who prioritized academic success above all else may find themselves struggling to perform at school. Supportive parents may begin missing recitals, football games and family dinners. There is no way to predict how substance use will affect your life until it has spiraled out of control.

Addiction to drugs and alcohol is a nationwide epidemic. This disease affects your brain and behavior – those who are addicted modify their lives to center around substance use. While the ways that people begin using or drinking may vary, it is universally accepted that no one starts using with the goal of becoming an addict.

Today, we have compiled some resources for those who would like to ask themselves this pivotal question. If you would like help, the team at Cumberland Heights is here for you.

Self-Test for Addiction

This yes-or-no self-test has been developed by Narcotics Anonymous. If you are wondering whether you are an addict, only you can answer that question. This may not be an easy task – from the beginning of your substance use, you probably told yourself, “I can handle it.” This is no longer true. Addiction is a progressive disease, meaning that it worsens with time.

There is nothing shameful about being an addict. Armed with this knowledge, you can begin making powerful, positive changes to your life. Take a moment to answer the questions below as honestly as you can. Keep track of how many items to which you respond “yes.”

  1. Do you ever use alone?
  2. Have you ever substituted one substance for another, thinking that one particular drug was the problem?
  3. Have you ever manipulated or lied to a doctor in order to obtain prescription drugs?
  4. Have you ever stolen drugs? Have you ever stolen in order to obtain drugs?
  5. Do you regularly use a drug when you wake up, or when you go to sleep?
  6. Have you ever taken one drug in order to overcome the effects of another substance?
  7. Do you avoid people or places that do not approve of your substance use?
  8. Have you ever used a drug without knowing what it was, or how it would affect you?
  9. Has your work or school performance ever suffered from your substance use?
  10. Have you ever been arrested as a result of using drugs or alcohol?
  11. Have you ever lied about how much you use, or what you use?
  12. Do you put the purchase of drugs ahead of your financial responsibilities?
  13. Have you ever tried to control or stop your using?
  14. Have you ever been jailed, hospitalized, or placed in a treatment center because of your substance use?
  15. Does using interfere with your sleeping or eating habits?
  16. Does the thought of running out of drugs terrify you?
  17. Do you feel that it is impossible to live without drugs or alcohol?
  18. Do you ever question your own sanity?
  19. Is your drug use making life at home unhappy?
  20. Have you ever thought you couldn’t fit in or have a good time without drugs?
  21. Have you ever felt guilty, defensive, or ashamed of your substance use?
  22. Do you think a lot about drugs or alcohol?
  23. Have you had irrational or indefinable fears?
  24. Has using affected your sexual relationships?
  25. Have you ever taken drugs you didn’t prefer?
  26. Have you ever used drugs because of stress or emotional pain?
  27. Have you ever overdosed on any drugs?
  28. Do you continue to use in spite of negative consequences?
  29. Do you think you might have a drug problem?

Ultimately, the total number of yeses does not dictate your result. The answer to the question “Am I an addict?” lies in your feeling about how substance use has affected your life.

Many people try to make excuses, believing that their circumstances are different or that they are just having a tough time. Ultimately, the truth is that addiction makes life unmanageable. Narcotics Anonymous requires the acceptance of three realizations:

  1. We are powerless over addiction and our lives are unmanageable;
  2. Although we are not responsible for our disease, we are responsible for our recovery;
  3. We can no longer blame people, places and things for our addiction. We must face our problems and our feelings.

I’m an Addict. What Can I Do?

Acknowledging that you are an addict is an important first step to finding recovery. Next, you must create a plan to get well. What should you look for?

Seeking treatment for addiction can be a complicated endeavor. Many people may feel overwhelmed by this process – a simple Google search uncovers countless nearby treatment centers, all with vastly different offerings. Luckily, there are a few specific criteria you can look for in a facility that ensures high quality of care.

  • Joint Commission Accreditation – A seal of approval from this governing body means that a center has committed to high standards of patient safety, evidence-based care and continued education for providers. It can only be attained through an on-site visit and must be maintained afterwards. This indicates that a facility has achieved the gold standard of addiction treatment providers.
  • NAATP Membership – Facilities affiliated with NAATP, the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers, must submit proof of adherence to best practices and a universal code of ethics.

Once you have reviewed a center for these standards, you should also take some time to tour their facilities. Most places will have a page on their website dedicated to showing off amenities like walking trails, labyrinths and ropes courses. When you know more about a center, you will feel more comfortable pursuing your recovery there.

Contact a Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment Center

Finally, you should contact the admissions center at your facility of choice. At Cumberland Heights, our friendly admissions staff are available 24/7 and can even help to verify your insurance coverage. They will discuss your treatment options and help you to organize your finances in order to obtain care. If you are worried about being an addict, we can help. Contact Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Life actually has meaning to me now

Todd M Podcast – Sobriety doesn’t make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Imagine your drug-addicted lifestyle being broadcast on national television. It happened to Todd M. on the popular A&E show “Intervention.” The season 16 episode followed Todd as he smoked meth and downed pills in his parent’s barn. The experience led him to Cumberland Heights where he now works with three years of sobriety under his belt. Hear how he felt watching that episode for the first time, and why the Californian decided to stick around Tennessee.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

Recovery Live Podcasts

Recovery Live Podcasts - Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a few key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them.

Recovery Live Podcasts

Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a several key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them.

Listen to podcasts on your Apple® iPhone, Apple iPad, Google Android®, Mac/PC, Alexa smart speaker – and even in your car. For free!

Episode 1:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Travis Meadows

Travis Meadows Podcast – God did for me what I couldn’t do for myself.

Liz talks candidly with “Nashville’s Favorite Underdog” Travis Meadows about losing his brother at a young age, cancer, addiction and his treatment journal that inspired an album. Even with so much success, writing songs for Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Wynonna Judd, Meadows says his biggest triumph is making it this far in his sobriety journey.

Episode 2:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Jaime G Podcast – Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Liz sits down with Jaime Gibbons, alumna of Cumberland Heights– to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime’s greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It’s a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

Episode 3:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Alexis H Podcast – I’m 100% grateful I’m an addict.

When Alexis went to treatment for the first time, she decided she was going to prove everyone wrong and not take any suggestions. When that didn’t work the first or second time, she finally decided to take all the suggestions when she was in treatment for the third time. Now sober for four and a half years, Alexis talks about how recovery got her through her parents’ divorce, allowed her to experience true joy for the first time, and make it possible for her to help other women struggling like her.

Episode 4:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Life actually has meaning to me now

Alex H Podcast – Life actually has meaning to me now.

Spending his early 20s in the restaurant industry meant late nights, free booze and social night caps. But as Alex explains, things got out of hand quickly and he found himself at Cumberland Heights. Fortunately, now in recovery, he’s able to use his talents as a chef to serve others fighting similar demons.

Episode 5:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Sobriety doesn't make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Todd M Podcast – Sobriety doesn’t make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Imagine your drug-addicted lifestyle being broadcast on national television. It happened to Todd M. on the popular A&E show, “Intervention.” The season 16 episode followed Todd as he smoked meth and downed pills in his parents’ barn. This experience led him to Cumberland Heights, where he now works with three years of sobriety under his belt. Hear how Todd felt watching that episode for the first time, and why this Californian decided to stick around Tennessee.

Elton John takes to Twitter to announce his 29th Year Sober
Elton John takes to Twitter to announce his 29th Year Sober

At Cumberland Heights we encourage patients, alumni and staff to recover out loud if they feel comfortable. It helps erase the stigma and gives hope to others who may be struggling. Many of us look up to celebrities who choose to recover out loud – I mean, think of the number of people someone like Sir Elton John reaches compared to us!

Just look to his latest tweet that read, “I finally summoned up the courage to say 3 words that would change my life: ‘I need help.’ Thank you to all the selfless people who have helped me on my journey through sobriety. I am eternally grateful.” As of Aug. 2, that tweet had been liked by nearly 125,000 people, retweeted by 14,000 and commented on by more than 2,000. Talk about an impact.

The star’s struggles with addiction were also laid out in a recently released movie, “Rocketman”, an unapologetic, biopic musical that doesn’t sugarcoat his years of sex, drugs and other risky behaviors.

Elton has said it was difficult for him to watch.

“This is how my life was, and I didn’t want to cover it and gloss it over,” he said. “And it’s difficult to watch because I thought, ‘God, I don’t want to go back there. Thank God I came out of it’.”

He continued, “Success was fantastic, and then I couldn’t cope with it,” he added of the pressures of fame. “And you can’t leave out the bad.”

Elton John, Courtesy: Smooth Radio
Courtesy: Smooth Radio

It was the 1990 death of Ryan White, a young AIDS victim and friend of John’s that made the superstar take a step back and look at his own life. He checked into treatment shortly after.

Elton John even used his new lease on life to start the Elton John AIDS foundation which has raised over $400,000 dollars to combat the disease. John is also celebrating his 5th wedding anniversary this year to David Furnish, who he has been with for 25 years. Together they have two sons – Zachary, 8 and Elijah, 6.

“I am survivor. I’ve survived a lot of things. Life is full of pitfalls, even when you’re sober. I can deal with them now because I don’t have to run away and hide,” said Elton.

The 72-year-old has a big fall planned. He will resume his farewell tour in September. He’ll be here in Nashville at Bridgestone Arena on October 28th. The Grammy winner also penned a new song “Never Too Late” for “The Lion King” that just hit theaters.

We’re all guilty of it. Whether it’s jumping to conclusions, making generalizations or responding with emotion rather that sound evidence, unhealthy ways of thinking can creep up on us especially during stressful times. We’re not perfect so it’s okay as long as we can be mindful of when we’re doing this and take steps to change our thought process next time.

Below are the ten most common unhelpful thinking styles according to Adam Sicinski. Sicinski is an Australian life coach that uses mind maps and visual thinking principles. What are mind maps you ask? It’s an easy way to brainstorm thoughts organically without worrying about order and structure. It allows you to visually structure your ideas to help with analysis and recall. To the right you’ll see an example of a mind map.

Sicinski calls his unique mind maps IQMatrix. You can learn more by clicking here, but for the purpose of this article, we are just going to dive right into those 10 unhelpful thinking styles that when used too often can harm relationships and keep you from success.

Mental Filter

Here you tend to filter things in and out of your conscious awareness. This is a form of “tunnel vision” where you only tend to focus on a part of something and you ignore the rest. You might for instance only filter out all the negatives of a particular situation. You therefore only see the negatives and fail to recognize and acknowledge the positives. Your vision of reality is therefore based on your flawed perspective of the negativity you see in each particular situation.

Jumping to Conclusions

Here you tend to jump to unjustified conclusions. You make quick assumptions about how things are and what they’re going to be like in the future (predictive thinking), or you will assume that you know what someone else is thinking (mind reading). These conclusions and assumptions are not based on fact or evidence but rather based on your feelings and personal opinions. As such, they can often lead you astray down the wrong path.

Personalization

Here you tend to blame yourself for your problems and for everything that goes wrong in your life. You might for instance continuously blame yourself for your misfortunes and bad luck. This will be true whether or not you are responsible or partly responsible for the problem or misfortune. Taking responsibility for things is admirable, however, it can end up being a very burdensome habit-of-mind that leads to very strong feelings of guilt and regret.

                                                                             Black and White Thinking

Woman working through trauma in addiction recovery

Here you tend to only see the extremes of a situation. You either see one extreme or another and this is why it’s called black and white thinking. You will for instance either see the good or bad, the right or wrong, the sad or happy, the left or right, etc. And because of your extreme way of viewing things, there is never a middle-ground. As such you are unlikely to view things in an unbiased and neutral way.

Catastrophising

Here you tend to completely blow things out of proportion and make them out to be a lot worse than they should be. The reality of the situation might be quite insignificant and small. However, because you’re in the habit of catastrophizing, you always tend to make your problems larger than life — thereby making your problems even more difficult to overcome.

Overgeneralization

Here you tend to reference your past in order to make assumptions about the present. You might, for example, take one instance from the past and use that as a “predictor” or barometer for a current or future situation. Whenever you use the words “He always… She always… Everyone… You never… People never… I never…” you are at that moment overgeneralizing.

Shoulding and Musting

Here you tend to put unreasonable demands and pressure on yourself and on other people to do certain things. You tend to say, “I must… I should… You must… You should…”. These statements provide insight into the standards you tend to uphold and the things you expect of yourself and others. These standards can of course at times be helpful, however at other times “shoulding” and “musting” can create unrealistic expectations that you or others will struggle to live up to.

Labeling

Here you tend to label yourself or other people in certain ways based on behavior in very specific situations. These labels you make form your belief systems. Therefore the more times you use these labels the stronger your beliefs become. This can be a good thing, however, it’s unhelpful when you tend to label things a certain way despite the facts and evidence that are inconsistent with the labels you are making.

Magnification and MinimizationHow you should respond to alcohol cues in addiction recovery

Here you tend to magnify the positives attributes of another person, while at the same time minimizing your own positive attributes. You are essentially devaluing yourself — bringing yourself down — while raising the stature of other people. In this scenario, you tend to explain-away everything you have going for yourself including your positive traits, characteristics, and achievements as though they don’t matter.

Emotional Reasoning

Here you tend to base your view of a particular situation in accordance with how you’re feeling. Therefore your feelings dictate how you perceive a situation despite evidence to the contrary. As such you might choose to feel bad about something that is going to happen just because you are feeling miserable in the moment. You are therefore using your current emotional state as a barometer that directs how you will view your life and circumstances.

Again, if you find yourself using these unhelpful thinking styles, it’s okay. The harm comes when we repeat this way of thinking and do nothing to try and change it. If we take note of, and work to change our thinking styles, we will find our work relationships, personal relationships and oveall happiness will improve greatly.


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