Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment

Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment


Adolescent Treatment: How Recent Treatment Trends May Not Meet Patient Needs

Presentation Details:

During the presentation, we will identify current trends in adolescent substance use, explore a number of adolescent treatment modalities, and outline discrepancies between pertinent research and treatment trends.

  1. Gaining a better understanding about current trends in adolescent substance use;
  2. Exploring recent changes in adolescent treatment options around the country;
  3. Evaluate whether trendy treatment modalities align with current research on the needs of adolescents with substance use disorders

Presentation Date:

September 12, 2018 – 2 sessions; participants only need to choose 1 session. They are identical sessions.

  • 9:00AM – 12:00PM
  • 1:00PM – 4:00PM

Cost: $10.00 per attendee

REGISTER NOW

Presenter Bio: Kelly Little, MSW, LCASA

Ms. Little received her undergraduate degree in Psychology at Elon University and her Masters in Social Work at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte. Her passion for working in the field of addiction grew out of her experience with harm reduction strategies, as she worked as a college-level peer educator for 5 years. Through this experience, she researched the impact of body image on male and female college students, as well as the impact of CBT on adolescents with substance use disorders. Ms. Little has worked the treatment field since 2011, specializing in the treatment of adolescents. She has been at the Dilworth Center for 5 years and is currently responsible for adult and adolescent assessments, adolescent patient caseloads, patient and family education, and group therapy facilitation.

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Addiction Effects the Entire Family

Addiction is a family disease that stresses the family to the breaking point, impacts the stability of the home, the family’s unity, mental health, physical health, finances, and overall family dynamics. Join us to learn about how your family might be effected and what you can do to support yourself, your family and your loved ones who may be struggling with substance use.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: Bellevue Family YMCA – 8101 TN-100 Nashville, TN 37212
DATE: July 26, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 8:00PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER:

Meet Our Speaker Kristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland HeightsKristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland Heights. Kristy has been a counselor for 15 years working mostly in addiction treatment but also began her career working in community mental health. Kristy received her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern Indiana. Kristy is trained in EMDR. Kristy has worked with children, adolescents, young adults and adults providing individual and family therapy. Kristy moved to Nashville from Indiana in 2008, joining the Cumberland Heights team in 2012.

Misuc & the Brain is a musical and spiritual journey from self-centeredness to humility, using stories and songs. This journey is a long and difficult one in recovery.Singer/songwriter and piano player John McAndrew, Bogie Bowles, LMSW, and Tammy Stone, LADAC, LPC-SMHP take us on a musical and spiritual journey from self-centeredness to humility, using stories and songs. This journey is a long and difficult one in recovery. Recent studies show us that music can reach the parts of the brain that are linked to addiction, and can function as an integral part of recovery. This experiential session demonstrates how music and music therapy can be applied in a variety of treatment settings to bring about therapeutic change.

Cost for this workshop is $30 (lunch is included).

WHO: Anyone & Everyone!!
WHAT: Music and the Brain Workshop – A musical and spiritual journey from self-centeredness to humility, using stories and songs.
WHEN: Friday, July 27, 2018 from 11:30AM – 2:00PM CDT
WHERE: Belle Meade United Methodist Church, Fellowship Hall
121 Davidson Road
Nashville, TN 37205

REGISTER NOW

PEGRAM, Tenn. (WKRN) – Jay Crosson has a big vision.

He’s CEO of Cumberland Heights, a drug and alcohol treatment center in Nashville.

Next summer, the nonprofit plans to turn a 67-acre plot of land into a recovery center for teen boys called ARCH Academy.

“They’re progressing into substances that can kill them really quick,” Crosson said. “We really need that intervention to break that cycle of addiction.”

ARCH Academy will offer a six-month recovery program for boys ages 14 to 18 battling addiction.

“We want these kids to graduate high school,” he said. “We want them to go to college.”

Up to 30 teens will live on campus which will be designed will three residence halls, a school, dining hall, and counseling room where they’ll work with therapists like Dean Porterfield.

“Anxiety, depression, trauma, we treat the whole child,” said Porterfield, director of adolescent services for Cumberland Heights.

Porterfield says about 57 percent of the teens they treat are addicted to marijuana. 10 percent are addicted to cocaine, five percent to heroin or opiates, and about 29 percent to a mix of drugs.

“It’s not uncommon for that teenager’s first experience to be at 10, 12, 13 years old,” Porterfield said.

The goal of the new center is to go more in-depth with teens, offering six months of help instead of the current program which is one to two months long.

“If we can get a longer length of stay, we can get a more solid recovery,” Crosson said.

The nonprofit will hold a groundbreaking ceremony for the teen center on Thursday, April 26.

They hope to have it up and running by summer 2019.


Copyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Original Author: Nashville Post Staff Reports

Belmont University’s health sciences simulation program has received accreditation in the teaching/education sectors from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSIH) and the Council for Accreditation of Healthcare Simulation Programs.

The status is for a five-year period and is valid through December 2022, according to a release.

Belmont’s simulation program, the first in the state to receive such accreditation, aims to improve patient safety and health outcomes by providing evidence-based, experiential education.

Additionally, the program’s material recycling program was acknowledged as one of Belmont’s best practices. The program saves the university more than $40,000 per year, the university notes.

Dr. Beth Hallmark, director of the program, stressed the importance of the program.

“Simulation is a safe place to participate in patient care,” Hallmark said. “It enhances patient safety and improves patient outcomes by increasing confidence and improving clinical reasoning. We also are able to expose our students to interprofessional training.”

PhyMed Healthcare Group partners with Michigan entity

Traverse Anesthesia Associates, which provides comprehensive anesthesia and interventional pain management services in Northern Michigan, has partnered with Nashville-based PhyMed Healthcare Group, a physician-led and owned leader of anesthesia and pain management services.

Through the partnership, financial terms of which were not disclosed in a release, TAA will expand its presence in the Michigan market to service health care facilities across the state.

Cross Keys Capital served as exclusive financial advisor to TAA.

TAA comprises 55 physicians and anesthetists.

“We are excited to partner with TAA, one of the premier anesthesia groups in the state of Michigan,” Marty Bonick, president and chief executive officer of PhyMed. “PhyMed understands the challenges facing practices like TAA, and we provide the support and resources to create a platform for lasting success.”

PhyMed has practice partnerships in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Kentucky.

Aetna Institute recognizes Cumberland Heights

Nashville-based nonprofit substance abuse treatment center Cumberland Heights (an aerial view of the campus is seen above) has been designated an Aetna Institute of Quality for Behavioral Health – Substance Abuse facility.

Aetna, which makes information about the quality and cost of health care services available to its members, recognizes facilities in its network for excellence in care, commitment to continuous improvement, the meeting of standards of quality and cost efficiency.

“The Institute of Quality validates the great work Cumberland Heights does every day to help patients and families suffering from alcohol and drug addiction,” Cumberland Heights Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson said in a release. “Designations like this are a total team effort that begins with the first phone call and extends through a lifetime of recovery opportunities.”

Cumberland Heights began operations in 1966. Every year, approximately 2,500 patients seek drug and alcohol abuse treatment at its River Road facility and its 12 outpatient treatment centers throughout Tennessee.

InfoWorks marks 20th anniversary

Nashville-based business solutions provider InfoWorks has recognized its 20th anniversary this year.

Of note, the company continues to expand throughout the Southeast and has been recognized as a three-time (2014-16) entry on Inc. 5000’s fastest-growing companies in America list, according to a release.

InfoWorks has worked with more than 300 companies, with its client roster having included multiple 2017 Fortune 500 companies.

“The foundation of InfoWorks’ 20-year success is in our hiring practices, which focus on identifying talented people who are a great fit with our culture and, ultimately, our clients,” Jim Clayton, company chair and CEO, said in the release. “This guiding principle has allowed InfoWorks to expand our reach from Nashville into the Southeast, and it’s the foundation that we’ll build upon in our third decade.”

By: Brett Martin
WKRN New Channel 2, Nashville

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Addiction is sweeping the country and impacting young people every day. According to the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, 25 percent of teenagers who use drugs become addicted before they turn 18.

“Drug addiction is chaotic,” said a former addict at Cumberland Heights in northwest Davidson County. Addiction is becoming far too normal for people, including teenagers. “Not all of them have gotten to that point, especially the youth, where they could be addicted, but they are definitely on a path,” said Dean Porterfield, Director of Adolescent and Young Adult Services.

There is no doubt in Alex Booth’s mind that he is a recovering addict. Booth is 28 years old now and once was hooked on pain pills. “Drinking on the weekends, partying, having fun was all that I really cared about, and it’s not realistic to have that kind of lifestyle,” said Booth. Booth came to Cumberland Heights years ago. He said without their help, he might not be alive today.

“I was on death’s door when I got to Cumberland Heights. I had a very low heart beat from being on so many depressants for so long,” said Booth. That is a scary reality for many teenagers and young adults. “I had pretty much given up and I said, ‘Do whatever.’ I’d follow any suggestion,” Booth told News 2.

A report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse says 50 percent of teens have tried alcohol and 40 percent have used some kind of illegal drug by their senior year in high school.

Porterfield said most of the teenagers coming to them are addicted to alcohol and marijuana and headed down a dark path with prescription pain pills. “We are starting to see teenagers and young adults getting into substances at a faster rate and a more lethal rate,” said Porterfield. Porterfield said the biggest challenge is making sure teenagers understand the disease and want to get help. “It’s not uncommon for someone to get to us and have the drug history, substance abuse history of someone that is much older,” explained Porterfield.

That is something Booth said was a huge hurdle for him and others who have hit rock bottom.

“I remember being a teenager and thinking that I had the entire world figured out,” Booth said.

Original By: AMY ESKIND
Posted On: September 25, 2017

NPR: Combining Dangerous Drugs Pushes Tennessee Overdose Deaths To Record High
NPR: How Drug Combos Are Making Tennessee’s Opioid Problem Even More Deadly

The combining of powerful drugs — both purposeful and unintentional — is making Tennessee’s opioid epidemic even more deadly. The latest figures out this month show 2016 was another record year for overdoses in the state — more than 1,600 people died. And experts say risky drug cocktails are compounding the problem.

Emergency responders have answered hundreds of 9-1-1 calls from friends and family members of people who have overdosed. Last year Davidson County lost 261 people to overdose, almost all of them from opiates. On the street, heroin is a cheaper opiate than pills. Many users are looking for whatever will give them the highest high, says recovering addict Mary Barton Lea.

“When I was buying my heroin I said, ‘who’s got the heroin with the fentanyl?’” she says. “That’s the heroin I want.”

Fentanyl is a very strong opiate that magnifies the experience and lasts longer. Experts expect to see more of it coming into Middle Tennessee.

“It’s a sleep-like state, it’s a state that you feel secure,” Lea says. “I’ve read — and I tend to agree with this — it’s almost like kissing God, because it takes you to a place you’ve never been before.”

But that incredible high comes with a physical and mental addiction, Lea says.

“When you come down from that state, all your body says is I want to get back there…You get up there quick, but then there’s a crash and the crash is horrible. The crash is you will do anything within your power to get more.”

Serious addicts like Lea may be willing to flirt with death. Others are simply unaware, says Sam MacMaster. He’s the chief clinical officer at JourneyPure, an addiction treatment provider. He warns that no one can be sure what they’re buying in the illegal market.

How Drug Combos Are Making Tennessee's Opioid Problem Even More Deadly
Sadly, 2016 was another record year for overdoses in the state — more than 1,600 people died. And experts say risky drug cocktails are compounding the problem.

“You would not be able to tell [by] how it looks at all, and that’s the issue,” MacMaster says. “They believe that they’re purchasing typically heroin or sometimes even a pilled opiate but it’s been cut with fentanyl.”

Indeed, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency issued a warning about counterfeit Vicodin and Oxycontin pills. As with heroin, unscrupulous dealers add fentanyl to give themselves a marketing edge — they’ve got the strong stuff.

But some users are buying the laced drugs unknowingly. They may erroneously think it’s stronger because it’s more pure. The next thing they know, they can’t breathe. Then their heart stops.

“If I believe I’m shooting x-amount of heroin, I may in fact be shooting something that is much more potent. And while I may have a sense of what my body can handle, I’ll have no idea what my body can handle in terms of the fentanyl,” MacMaster says.

Some dealers are even lacing their supplies with carfentanil, a veterinary opiate that can knock out a rhino.

But lethal combinations go beyond various opioids. Users have also been adding prescription anxiety medications, such as Xanax, Valium or Klonopin. Not only is that a doubling up on medications that depress the central nervous system, experts worn there can be a multiplier effect. And it’s hitting teens and young adults hard, especially since many of them already have anti-anxiety prescriptions. Others have painkillers, maybe prescribed for an injury.

“There’s actually prescription parties where kids will have a party and everybody raids the medicine cabinets they can get to, brings them to the party, and then you have whatever you have at that party for people to experiment with,” says Cinde Stewart Freeman, chief clinical officer at Cumberland Heights, an addiction treatment center.

Cole Szabo, adolescent specialist at Cumberland Heights, says the days when kids stuck to beer and marijuana are gone.

“The benzos and opioids are the new gateway drug,” he says. And it’s in the schools. “You’re seeing Xanax, you’re seeing benzos, you’re seeing hydrocodones, oxycodones, Vicodin – you’re seeing that more. The problem with that is, you’re going to die quickly. It’s a quick death, you’re going down fast.”

If administered in time a nasal spray called Narcan that reverses the effects of opiates can save a life. Emergency responders in Nashville have used it on more than 500 people already this year.

But Narcan has no effect on other drugs like anti-anxiety pills, cocaine, or alcohol, so combination overdoses can still prove lethal. That was unfortunately the case for Max Barry, the son of Nashville’s mayor, who could not be revived with Narcan, and died over the summer in Colorado with much more than opiates in his system.


Original Article By: MICHAEL CORKERY, NY Times
Date: SEPT. 15, 2017

As drug addiction soars in the United States, a booming business of rehab centers has sprung up to treat the problem. And when drug addicts and their families search for help, they often turn to Google.

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety

But prosecutors and health advocates have warned that many online searches are leading addicts to click on ads for rehab centers that are unfit to help them or, in some cases, endangering their lives.

This week, Google acknowledged the problem — and started restricting ads that come up when someone searches for addiction treatment on its site. “We found a number of misleading experiences among rehabilitation treatment centers that led to our decision,” Google spokeswoman Elisa Greene said in a statement on Thursday.

Google has taken similar steps to restrict advertisements only a few times before. Last year it limited ads for payday lenders, and in the past it created a verification system for locksmiths to prevent fraud.

In this case, the restrictions will limit a popular marketing tool in the $35 billion addiction treatment business, affecting thousands of small-time operators.

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety

“This is a bold move by one of the world’s biggest companies, saying people’s lives are more important than profit,” said Greg Williams, co-founder of Facing Addiction, a nonprofit group that is an advocate for people struggling with addiction.

Many rehab centers, a large number of which are clustered in warm climates like Florida, Arizona and California, rely on Google searches to attract patients from across the country. Their strategy often included buying an ad that would come up when someone searched for phrases like “drug rehab” or “alcohol treatment centers.”

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads

As of this week, Google has stopped selling ads related to those searches, although it may lift the restriction if it can find a way to weed out misleading advertisements.

Search ads for addiction treatment are lucrative. Treatment providers, in some cases, have been willing to pay $70 per ad click, according to an analysis that Mr. Williams’ group conducted and presented to Google executives.

But the payoff for those clicks can be significant. Addicts who sign up for 30 days of residential treatment can bring in tens of thousands of dollars from private insurance.

The crucial, if unwitting, role that Google has played in the treatment industry exposes the deep flaws in how drug addicts are cared for in America. Despite the rapid growth in the number of addiction cases — and the Trump Administration’s declaration that the opioid crisis is a national emergency — the treatment industry remains a hodgepodge of upstart businesses, with only a few well-known providers.

What constitutes treatment is also all over the map, from yoga and equine therapy to daily doses of medication. And unlike other serious illnesses, like cancer or heart disease, where a physician typically refers the patient for treatment, many addicts and their families look for help on the internet.

That has made Google one of the largest referral sources for treating a disease that affects millions of Americans. And the companies willing to the pay the most for ads are the one that addicts are most likely to see on their search.

But ad-driven searches, according to advocates and law enforcement officials, have not always led patients to the best care. In some cases, they have found that patients are being duped, a phenomenon Google on Thursday acknowledged.

Last December, a Florida grand jury released a report detailing abuses in the state’s addiction treatment industry, which is centered around Palm Beach County. Among the findings, the grand jury zeroed on the problems with how some of the shoddy programs were being marketed online.

One witness, according to the grand jury report, described how “online marketers use Google search terms to essentially hijack the good name and reputation of notable treatment providers only to route the caller to the highest bidder.”

Another common trap: Addicts search Google for a rehab program close to their home, but they will click on an ad for a referral service pitching treatment in another state. The referral service then collects a fee, if they signed up.

Google’s restrictions were cheered by health officials, who have called for more medically based treatment. “People don’t always know what good treatment is,” said Dr. Vivek Murthy, who was surgeon general in the Obama Administration and published a oft-cited report last year that warned of the nation’s addiction crisis. “I am glad Google took steps to prevent the spread of these false ads.”

In targeting the ads for addiction treatment, Google consulted with experts including Mr. Williams, who himself has been in recovery for many years. He said he began discussions with Google executives around the time that Dr. Murthy released his report.

Mr. Williams said that he had explained to Google that his own experience trying to buy ads from the company had illustrated how the process of finding information about addiction treatment online was providing people with unreliable information. Mr. Williams said he discovered this when his group received a grant from Google that would help him buy ads promoting a website providing information about community based treatment — and found he couldn’t compete.

Buying ads on Google involves bidding to place your ad at the top of the search results when a user types in words relevant to your product or service. But Mr. Williams found that the bid prices for words related to treatment had gotten so expensive that his group couldn’t pay as much as the for-profit treatment providers. Some of those treatment providers, Mr. Williams told Google, were not only misleading, they had been charged with crimes.

In a series of phone calls and a meeting in Washington, D.C., Mr. Williams presented the company his research. He highlighted that some of the biggest buyers of ad words related to treatment had been accused of misdeeds related to insurance fraud and sexual assault.

“We stumbled upon this issue organically,” said Mr. Williams. “And they heard us out.”


A version of this article appears in print on September 15, 2017, on Page B5 of the New York edition with the headline: In Rare Move, Google Imposes New Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Women

The Women’s Program at Cumberland Heights responds to the specific needs of women by keeping the patient’s relationship with herself and others at the heart of the program. We provide a safe, healing environment that is conducive to restoring these connections.

Cumberland Heights' Director of The Women's Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Director of The Women’s Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The Women’s Program addresses the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of women with addiction, empowering them to move from addiction to recovery.  Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.  The Women’s Program is up to 30 days in length and our primary program for women ages 18 and up. Studies have shown that women respond better to treatment in a gender specific setting, so at Cumberland Heights our Women’s Program offers an all-female staff and 12 Step based therapies tailored specifically to women’s issues.

Each patient receives an individual treatment plan with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Women and Sober Living program for Men.   These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

With the high incidence of trauma among women, we provide trauma screening and trauma informed care, allowing a woman to begin to heal from painful situations, as well as old wounds worsened by addiction.  If symptoms of trauma surface, we offer education, assessments, coping skills and referral for appropriate therapy. We recognize the importance of addressing the shame often related to addiction as well as issues such as body image, parenting and a loss of spirit.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others. The skills acquired during this process are essential to establishing and maintaining a healthy and happy life, free from alcohol and drugs.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others
Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.

Women’s First Step Program

Many potential patients who need residential care have circumstances such as financial, vocational and/or familial responsibilities that may dictate a shorter length of stay. Cumberland Heights’ First Step Program offers a customized program that stabilizes, educates and prepares patients for the next level of care. This program has a variable length of stay and works with the patient’s health insurance provider in preparing the patient’s transition to an outpatient treatment program in their community.

Women’s Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for women who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps women identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.




Alcohol & Drug Addiction – Adult Men’s Recovery Services

Cumberland Heights' Men's Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Men’s Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

When Cumberland Heights opened its doors in 1966, our Men’s Program was among the first of its kind providing men a new and rewarding life in recovery from addiction. Each program is gender specific and follows the fundamental teachings of the 12 Steps of recovery.

Through our 50+ years treating patients, we’ve found men often struggle the most with societal pressures that make it difficult for them to express their feelings or make them feel pressured to obtain a specific level of success.  The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.  In most cases,  the men’s program is up to 30 days in length and the primary program for men ages 18 and up. For those who require additional support, we also offer an Extended Care Program for men-only, up to 180 days in length, to assist those who desire a safe transitional program back into everyday life.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Men and Sober Living program for Women. These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

We tailor an individual plan for each patient, with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.

From a patient’s first assessment, through residential treatment, and all the way to their first aftercare group, newly recovering men are provided the necessary resources for a sober, productive and fulfilling life.  As part of the recovery community, men begin to break down the barriers addiction and stereotypes have built up.  As men learn intimately about the disease of addiction, they begin to normalize their feelings and experiences.

At Cumberland Heights, our goal is to help men turn the hard work of getting clean and sober into a lifetime of happiness and contentment.

Men’s First Step Program

The First Step Program is a combination of a residential stay for detoxification and stabilization as needed, followed by Intensive Outpatient treatment for three hours, four times/week to assist the patient in learning and establishing recovery skills. Length of stay in the residential and intensive outpatient components varies based upon clinical needs and outside support systems. The patient’s treatment team works to determine an individual recommendation for each patient. Family education groups are offered in both program components. Cumberland Heights contracts with a variety of insurance providers. Our staff can assist you and your family in estimating insurance benefits and out of pocket costs.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Men
The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.

Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for men who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps men identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

The Men’s Extended Care Community

The Men’s Extended Care Community is based on a 60 – 120 day residential stay. This program, which mirrors primary treatment in the Traditional Men’s Program or other similar program, helps you identify and address core psychological issues that may sabotage ongoing recovery. It also allows you to practice a daily recovery program in a supportive setting that’s less restrictive than primary care. Men come to the main campus every day for treatment activities and share transitional housing located one mile from the main campus. Active attendance and participation in the local 12-Step community creates a bridge between treatment and recovery community environments.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.









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