Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment

Tag Archives: Drug Abuse Treatment


Original Article By: MICHAEL CORKERY, NY Times
Date: SEPT. 15, 2017

As drug addiction soars in the United States, a booming business of rehab centers has sprung up to treat the problem. And when drug addicts and their families search for help, they often turn to Google.

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety

But prosecutors and health advocates have warned that many online searches are leading addicts to click on ads for rehab centers that are unfit to help them or, in some cases, endangering their lives.

This week, Google acknowledged the problem — and started restricting ads that come up when someone searches for addiction treatment on its site. “We found a number of misleading experiences among rehabilitation treatment centers that led to our decision,” Google spokeswoman Elisa Greene said in a statement on Thursday.

Google has taken similar steps to restrict advertisements only a few times before. Last year it limited ads for payday lenders, and in the past it created a verification system for locksmiths to prevent fraud.

In this case, the restrictions will limit a popular marketing tool in the $35 billion addiction treatment business, affecting thousands of small-time operators.

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety

“This is a bold move by one of the world’s biggest companies, saying people’s lives are more important than profit,” said Greg Williams, co-founder of Facing Addiction, a nonprofit group that is an advocate for people struggling with addiction.

Many rehab centers, a large number of which are clustered in warm climates like Florida, Arizona and California, rely on Google searches to attract patients from across the country. Their strategy often included buying an ad that would come up when someone searched for phrases like “drug rehab” or “alcohol treatment centers.”

Google Sets Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads

As of this week, Google has stopped selling ads related to those searches, although it may lift the restriction if it can find a way to weed out misleading advertisements.

Search ads for addiction treatment are lucrative. Treatment providers, in some cases, have been willing to pay $70 per ad click, according to an analysis that Mr. Williams’ group conducted and presented to Google executives.

But the payoff for those clicks can be significant. Addicts who sign up for 30 days of residential treatment can bring in tens of thousands of dollars from private insurance.

The crucial, if unwitting, role that Google has played in the treatment industry exposes the deep flaws in how drug addicts are cared for in America. Despite the rapid growth in the number of addiction cases — and the Trump Administration’s declaration that the opioid crisis is a national emergency — the treatment industry remains a hodgepodge of upstart businesses, with only a few well-known providers.

What constitutes treatment is also all over the map, from yoga and equine therapy to daily doses of medication. And unlike other serious illnesses, like cancer or heart disease, where a physician typically refers the patient for treatment, many addicts and their families look for help on the internet.

That has made Google one of the largest referral sources for treating a disease that affects millions of Americans. And the companies willing to the pay the most for ads are the one that addicts are most likely to see on their search.

But ad-driven searches, according to advocates and law enforcement officials, have not always led patients to the best care. In some cases, they have found that patients are being duped, a phenomenon Google on Thursday acknowledged.

Last December, a Florida grand jury released a report detailing abuses in the state’s addiction treatment industry, which is centered around Palm Beach County. Among the findings, the grand jury zeroed on the problems with how some of the shoddy programs were being marketed online.

One witness, according to the grand jury report, described how “online marketers use Google search terms to essentially hijack the good name and reputation of notable treatment providers only to route the caller to the highest bidder.”

Another common trap: Addicts search Google for a rehab program close to their home, but they will click on an ad for a referral service pitching treatment in another state. The referral service then collects a fee, if they signed up.

Google’s restrictions were cheered by health officials, who have called for more medically based treatment. “People don’t always know what good treatment is,” said Dr. Vivek Murthy, who was surgeon general in the Obama Administration and published a oft-cited report last year that warned of the nation’s addiction crisis. “I am glad Google took steps to prevent the spread of these false ads.”

In targeting the ads for addiction treatment, Google consulted with experts including Mr. Williams, who himself has been in recovery for many years. He said he began discussions with Google executives around the time that Dr. Murthy released his report.

Mr. Williams said that he had explained to Google that his own experience trying to buy ads from the company had illustrated how the process of finding information about addiction treatment online was providing people with unreliable information. Mr. Williams said he discovered this when his group received a grant from Google that would help him buy ads promoting a website providing information about community based treatment — and found he couldn’t compete.

Buying ads on Google involves bidding to place your ad at the top of the search results when a user types in words relevant to your product or service. But Mr. Williams found that the bid prices for words related to treatment had gotten so expensive that his group couldn’t pay as much as the for-profit treatment providers. Some of those treatment providers, Mr. Williams told Google, were not only misleading, they had been charged with crimes.

In a series of phone calls and a meeting in Washington, D.C., Mr. Williams presented the company his research. He highlighted that some of the biggest buyers of ad words related to treatment had been accused of misdeeds related to insurance fraud and sexual assault.

“We stumbled upon this issue organically,” said Mr. Williams. “And they heard us out.”


A version of this article appears in print on September 15, 2017, on Page B5 of the New York edition with the headline: In Rare Move, Google Imposes New Limits on Addiction Treatment Ads, Citing Safety.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Women

The Women’s Program at Cumberland Heights responds to the specific needs of women by keeping the patient’s relationship with herself and others at the heart of the program. We provide a safe, healing environment that is conducive to restoring these connections.

Cumberland Heights' Director of The Women's Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Director of The Women’s Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The Women’s Program addresses the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of women with addiction, empowering them to move from addiction to recovery.  Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.  The Women’s Program is up to 30 days in length and our primary program for women ages 18 and up. Studies have shown that women respond better to treatment in a gender specific setting, so at Cumberland Heights our Women’s Program offers an all-female staff and 12 Step based therapies tailored specifically to women’s issues.

Each patient receives an individual treatment plan with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Women and Sober Living program for Men.   These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

With the high incidence of trauma among women, we provide trauma screening and trauma informed care, allowing a woman to begin to heal from painful situations, as well as old wounds worsened by addiction.  If symptoms of trauma surface, we offer education, assessments, coping skills and referral for appropriate therapy. We recognize the importance of addressing the shame often related to addiction as well as issues such as body image, parenting and a loss of spirit.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others. The skills acquired during this process are essential to establishing and maintaining a healthy and happy life, free from alcohol and drugs.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others
Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.

Women’s First Step Program

Many potential patients who need residential care have circumstances such as financial, vocational and/or familial responsibilities that may dictate a shorter length of stay. Cumberland Heights’ First Step Program offers a customized program that stabilizes, educates and prepares patients for the next level of care. This program has a variable length of stay and works with the patient’s health insurance provider in preparing the patient’s transition to an outpatient treatment program in their community.

Women’s Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for women who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps women identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.




Alcohol & Drug Addiction – Adult Men’s Recovery Services

Cumberland Heights' Men's Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Men’s Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

When Cumberland Heights opened its doors in 1966, our Men’s Program was among the first of its kind providing men a new and rewarding life in recovery from addiction. Each program is gender specific and follows the fundamental teachings of the 12 Steps of recovery.

Through our 50+ years treating patients, we’ve found men often struggle the most with societal pressures that make it difficult for them to express their feelings or make them feel pressured to obtain a specific level of success.  The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.  In most cases,  the men’s program is up to 30 days in length and the primary program for men ages 18 and up. For those who require additional support, we also offer an Extended Care Program for men-only, up to 180 days in length, to assist those who desire a safe transitional program back into everyday life.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Men and Sober Living program for Women. These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

We tailor an individual plan for each patient, with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.

From a patient’s first assessment, through residential treatment, and all the way to their first aftercare group, newly recovering men are provided the necessary resources for a sober, productive and fulfilling life.  As part of the recovery community, men begin to break down the barriers addiction and stereotypes have built up.  As men learn intimately about the disease of addiction, they begin to normalize their feelings and experiences.

At Cumberland Heights, our goal is to help men turn the hard work of getting clean and sober into a lifetime of happiness and contentment.

Men’s First Step Program

The First Step Program is a combination of a residential stay for detoxification and stabilization as needed, followed by Intensive Outpatient treatment for three hours, four times/week to assist the patient in learning and establishing recovery skills. Length of stay in the residential and intensive outpatient components varies based upon clinical needs and outside support systems. The patient’s treatment team works to determine an individual recommendation for each patient. Family education groups are offered in both program components. Cumberland Heights contracts with a variety of insurance providers. Our staff can assist you and your family in estimating insurance benefits and out of pocket costs.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Men
The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.

Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for men who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps men identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

The Men’s Extended Care Community

The Men’s Extended Care Community is based on a 60 – 120 day residential stay. This program, which mirrors primary treatment in the Traditional Men’s Program or other similar program, helps you identify and address core psychological issues that may sabotage ongoing recovery. It also allows you to practice a daily recovery program in a supportive setting that’s less restrictive than primary care. Men come to the main campus every day for treatment activities and share transitional housing located one mile from the main campus. Active attendance and participation in the local 12-Step community creates a bridge between treatment and recovery community environments.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.








The Young Adult Program

We help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery while helping them process life's consequences and unmanageability.
We help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery.

In recent years, young adults, ages 18 – 25, have sought treatment for addiction in increasing numbers. Whereas patients well into adulthood often suffer from a damaged marriage or lost hope, younger patients experience what some refer to as a “failure to launch.” Most young adult addictions prevent them from reaching milestones such as college, careers or a healthy relationship.

Cumberland Heights’ Young Adult Program is a 12 Step based, gender specific recovery program for emerging adults ages 18 to 25 who are suffering from drug or alcohol addiction. The program is made up of an interdisciplinary clinical team of professionals specialized in working with addiction, emerging adults and collegiate recovery communities. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings and family therapy.

A focus on learning to manage emotions and interact effectively with peers in a caring, yet challenging community, is the core of helping this age group form a strong recovery identity.

Because many of our patients are currently seeking a secondary education we work closely with educational institutions to help patients resume their college careers, and lend the support necessary to stay sober in these challenging environments.

Most importantly, we help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery while helping them process life’s consequences and unmanageability.

Program Specifics

Our treatment model consists of a multi-faceted approach, understanding that connecting and relating to the male adolescent can be a challenge, but essential for positive outcomes.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

















Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.



3 Common Fears of Mothers Seeking Treatment

3 Common Fears of Mothers Seeking Treatment

Seven years ago, when I entered treatment, I was a mess. My focus was on getting through my withdrawals, and I wasn’t able to focus on anything else. After detox I began to feel human again until I realized I was going to be away from my children. My instinct was to run to them, beg their forgiveness and promise to never leave them again. However, I’d spent most my children’s lives begging forgiveness because of my addiction to methamphetamine and morphine. I was physically present for most of their milestones, but I wasn’t there emotionally. I was constantly thinking about how I was going to get high. My children were not my priority. So why was it so difficult to seek treatment as a mom? Here are 3 common fears of mothers seeking treatment:

“I can’t be away from my children for this long.

In reality we’ve been absent from our children’s lives for the majority of our addiction. Some of us may have been physically present, but we weren’t there emotionally or spiritually. I wanted to explain to my children how my disease hindered my ability to show them love. Guilt consumed me. However, within the first week of treatment my counselors helped me realize it took time to get here, and it would take time to heal. From this point, I began to believe in a power greater than myself. I believed I could be restored to sanity and returned to the lives of my children.

“I’m afraid someone will take custody of my children.”

Custody is complicated, but when a mother is actively seeking treatment it strengthens her ability to parent. Historically judges rule favorably to parents who have completed treatment.

“I don’t want my children to be scared because I’m in a treatment facility.”

Cumberland Heights has a beautiful campus on the banks of the Cumberland River. There are relaxed areas to visit with children including a playground and gymnasium to allow for play. Although it was wonderful to see my children while I was in treatment it was also emotionally and physically exhausting. I hadn’t been fully present with them in such a long time it took a lot of effort to become an attentive parent again. At this point the treatment center began to represent a place of healing opposed to a place secluding me from my children.

After going through treatment and especially the family program, I was able to realize one day clean with my children was worth more than a year high. Today, I would say the time spent away from my children in treatment was actually the most present I’ve ever been with them. I’m grateful for the ability to be present with my children, which I’ve learned to do through a 12-Step program. Now I have an amazing relationship with both my son and daughter, and we’re all learning how to be in each others lives.


Yolanda Lancaster graduated from Lipscomb University with a Bachelors of Social Work in 2015 and received her LADAC II in December 2016. She is a primary counselor in the Women’s Program at Cumberland Heights and sits on the board of Mending Hearts, a nonprofit treatment center for women. She is actively working her own 12-Step program, as well as nurturing, repairing and re-building relationships with her children.

How Do I Know I’ve Hit Bottom?

How Do I Know I’ve Hit Bottom?
Hit Bottom: Those of us who experience increased physical tolerance for alcohol or drugs inevitably see an increase in our mental and emotional tolerance for pain, suffering and compromising our values.
You can’t predict when you will “Hit bottom.” For some the mere threat of failing out of school, losing our spouse, family support or a job is motivation enough to begin the process of recovery. For others the bottom is a much messier, deeper, darker place. Those of us who experience increased physical tolerance for alcohol or drugs inevitably see an increase in our mental and emotional tolerance for pain, suffering and compromising our values. This desensitization is an integral part of the denial system a person needs to sustain their drinking or drug use. It sounds like, “Sure, my wife left me, I got a DUI and I was fired, but I don’t see why everyone else is so upset.” Similarly, a comment I’ve heard among younger, opiate addicted patients who relapse within a matter of weeks is, “Sure, I’ve overdosed a few times. I’ve had some friends die from overdose, but I don’t really need to do all this recovery stuff. I just need to quit using.”

Exactly what does it take to cause surrender? The unfortunate reality is past, present or future consequences, no matter how dire, are often not enough to cause a person to hit bottom and choose the path of recovery. That’s because hitting bottom, reaching the point when enough is enough, is an extremely personal thing. Some people in recovery describe having a moment when the pain and fear of staying in active addiction was greater than the pain and fear they felt about the recovery process. But the best definition I’ve heard recently was from a patient who defined hitting bottom by saying, “It’s when bad things are happening to me faster than I can lower my standards.”


Stan Bumgarner graduated from Vanderbilt Divinity School in 2006 and worked for the Tennessee Association of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services teaching ministers across the state. This led him to become an alcohol and drug counselor. He is currently the Spiritual Director at Cumberland. Stan is a regular speaker at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Clarksville, the father of thirteen-year-old twins and active in his own 12-Step recovery.

Mayor Megan Barry joined Cumberland Heights executives and other dignitaries for opening event

NASHVILLE, TENN. – Aug. 9, 2016 – Nashville-based alcohol and drug treatment center Cumberland Heights today officially opened its new Music Row Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) with an open house and ribbon cutting that included Mayor Megan Barry, musician John Hiatt and many other community leaders and supporters of Cumberland Heights.

IOPs offer alternatives to inpatient treatment for patients who seek daytime and evening counseling in order to continue with their schools or careers. IOPs offer flexible scheduling, group therapy, 12-Step meetings and specialized family therapy. The Music Row IOP is located at 1619  17th Ave. South.

“Cumberland Heights has a long history of working with members of the music industry, so it’s so great to finally be located here on Music Row,” said Cumberland Heights Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson. “We are excited to be located so close the music, collegiate and Downtown Nashville communities, making this type of treatment as accessible as possible to those that might need it. Cumberland Heights is known for recovery, and Nashville is known for music, so this is a natural location for us.”

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry also spoke briefly at the opening event. “I want to thank the entire staff of Cumberland Heights for all the good work that they do for people who are overcoming addiction and regaining control of their lives,” said Mayor Barry.  “This facility is such an important component of how we go about building a warm and welcoming place and serving our community. Thanks to Cumberland Heights and the Boedecker Foundation for making all of this possible.”

George Boedecker, who originally came to Nashville years ago to “do music,” created the Boedecker Foundation that purchased and renovated the Music Row building for Cumberland Heights, making this new IOP possible.

“The mission of The Boedecker Foundation is to provide critical resources to nonprofit organizations that inspire positive change within diverse communities around the world,” said Boedecker. “It is such an honor and a privilege to be partnering with Cumberland Heights and their Intensive Outpatient Therapy Services at this location.  We look forward to a long-lasting and impactful relationship.”

Since its founding in 1966, Cumberland Heights has built a reputation for helping many music industry professionals recover life from drug and alcohol addiction. The Music Row IOP places a 12 step-based rehabilitative program nearer those who need it most and affords more flexible care for those who do not require the medical detoxification that requires inpatient care.

The Music Row IOP is Cumberland Heights’ tenth outpatient facility in Tennessee and the first in the central part of Nashville. The organization opened its first IOP in 1987.

Photos from the grand opening

Introdution by Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights, and speech from Mayor Megan Barry

Introdution by Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights, and speech from Mayor Megan Barry

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a non-profit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding in 1966.

About the Boedecker Foundation

The Boedecker Foundation aspires to encourage positive outcomes through programs focused on education, health and wellness, youth development, along with family and community collaboration. At the central and innermost framework of The Boedecker Foundation’s endowments are partnerships and enduring relationships with organizations like Cumberland Heights, that have committed extensive resources to improve environmental circumstances, provide access to healthcare programs, and create opportunities for individuals, their families and communities in which they live. Through these guiding principles our Foundation has distributed over 28 million dollars to organizations in Tennessee and all across the nation.

# # #

Media Contact:
Amy A. Atkinson, APR
Amy Atkinson Communications
4117 Hillsboro Pike, Ste. 103308
Nashville, TN  37215
Cell: 615-305-8118
Email: Amy@AmyACommunications.com
www.AmyACommunications.com

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The alleged leader of a Honduran drug group has been arrested in Nashville.

Officials with Metro Nashville Police said in a Tweet Tuesday morning that Victor Cardoza Martinez was taken into custody at an apartment on Nolensville Pike.

Check out Cumberland Heights’ own Dr. Chapman Sledge discussing the local heroin epidemic and Honduran drug leader’s arrest with News Channel 4.

According to investigators, Martinez is the group’s suspected leader. Police also seized heroin, cocaine and cash in the raid.

Jackson Outpatient Office In the News:

While all patient satisfaction scores exceed 95% in all locations, Jackson office consistently, quarter by quarter, registers strong confidence of families and patients who visit.
While all patient satisfaction scores exceed 95% in all locations, Jackson office consistently, quarter by quarter, registers strong confidence of families and patients who visit.

Cumberland Heights Recognizes Excellence in Jackson Outpatient Office
Jackson Intensive Outpatient Staff Ruth Meyer and Christie Dotson recently received recognition for outstanding patient satisfaction, leading all Cumberland Heights outpatient offices in this important measure. While all patient satisfaction scores exceed 95% in all locations, Jackson office consistently, quarter by quarter, registers strong confidence of families and patients who visit.

(Left to Right) Christie Dotson and Ruth Meyer share a moment with Ernie Ward, Business Development Outreach Coordinator for Cumberland Heights
(Left to Right) Christie Dotson and Ruth Meyer share a moment with Ernie Ward, Business Development Outreach Coordinator for Cumberland Heights

As the field of addiction recovery evolves, evidence is pointing out therapeutic alignment – meaning the counselor and the patient are working on the same goals – has proven to be one of the most important factors predicting sustained recovery. According to Randal Lea, Executive Director for Cumberland’s Community Based Programs, “Nothing is more important in early recovery than keeping a patient engaged in their recovery, and counseling staff that puts rapport ahead of giving advice will be more successful.” Lea adds, “Christie and Ruth have shown they are able to let the patient set the pace for their growth and to take ownership over their recovery process.”

Cumberland Heights, celebrating its fiftieth year of operation, has been serving the Jackson community for over fifteen years. Soon there will be a total of 10 Cumberland Heights locations available to help communities in Tennessee. In addition to the Jackson Office on Stonebridge, Cumberland Heights has IOP facilities in Chattanooga, Cool Springs, Crossville, Hermitage, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Sumner County (Gallatin), in West Nashville on River Road and a new branch opening soon on Music Row location in the heart of Nashville.

Nationally Recognized Alcohol and Drug Treatment Center Begins Its Year of Celebrating Half a Century of Helping People to Recover Life

NASHVILLE, TENN. – Feb. 17, 2016 – Cumberland Heights drug and alcohol rehabilitation center will spend much of 2016 celebrating its 50th Anniversary and highlighting success stories from thousands of Nashvillians who have received treatment.

50th Anniversary commemorative coins modeled after "sober coins" that are a fixture of recovery.
50th Anniversary commemorative coins modeled after “sober coins” that are a fixture of recovery.

“We are honored and proud to have been a trusted provider of alcohol and drug addiction treatment for five decades,” said Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights. “Fifty years of experience brings us so many positive examples of helping patients and their families – we hope to be able to share some of these with the community throughout the year.”

In addition to events, Cumberland Heights will open a new intensive outpatient facility on Music Row in Nashville, expand its “Recover Life” communications campaign, produce a 50th Anniversary booklet and increase outreach in various ways.

The official kick-off event took place today with a staff-wide, kick-off party and Coin Ceremony where staff and board members received 50th Anniversary commemorative coins modeled after “sober coins” that are a fixture of recovery.

 

50th Anniversary Events and Initiatives Planned To Date Include:

  • Feb. 13 – Alumni distribute “Valentine kits” to homeless community
  • Feb. 17 – staff Kick-Off Party and Coin Ceremony
  • All year – “Recover Life” campaign, story sharing and commemoration coins
  • 50th Anniversary history booklet release
  • April 6 – “The Women’s Luncheon” with speaker Liz Murray, best-selling author of “Breaking Night” on which “Homeless to Harvard” was based
  • May Opening of Music Row IOP (Date TBD)
  • Sept. 17 – Alumni & Staff Picnic with guest speaker Paul Williams
  • Fall – Fundraising Concert at the Ryman (Date TBD)
  • Fall – “Shelter at the Pond” commemoration ceremony (Date TBD)
  • December – Endowment Society Reception

Patients’ families are often included in the recovery process because success depends on a strong support system once they leave Cumberland Heights. “That’s why,” Crosson says, “friends and family are included in many of our 50th Anniversary events.”

New Intensive Outpatient Treatment Facility

Cumberland Heights has had a longstanding relationship with the Nashville music industry. However, it has never had a facility on Music Row. That will change in May when Cumberland Heights opens its first Music Row intensive outpatient facility on 17th Ave. South.

“Recover Life” Campaign

Cumberland Heights recently launched a multi-channel communications campaign called “Recover Life.” The campaign features staff members holding sober coins and saying how many years they have been sober. This month, the campaign expands to include other alumni as well as the families of patients.

A Quick History

Fifty years ago, Robert Crichton Sr. and his personal physician, Dr. Thomas Frist Sr., recognized an unmet need in Middle Tennessee and had a dream. They saw friends, neighbors and patients who were suffering from alcoholism and the disease of addiction. They had a vision of an accessible treatment facility in Nashville. They found a beautiful farm located on rolling hills along the banks of the Cumberland River and said, “What if?” They were, indeed, their brother’s keeper.

It is notable that the charter of incorporation established Cumberland Heights as a private, not-for-profit organization. The founders’ mission was to provide hope and restore patients to the full life of recovery – not to attain personal gain.

Starting with a few alcoholic men, Cumberland Heights gradually expanded to treat women, adolescents and families. Cumberland Heights was a pioneer of 12-Step-based recovery in Middle Tennessee and is now widely recognized and respected as one of the top treatment facilities in America. Cumberland Heights is still true to its original core values that the patient comes first and its greatest assets are its alumni, staff and campuses.

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a non-profit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding.


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