Tag Archives: drug addiction

Tag Archives: drug addiction


Opioid Overdose Response-Naloxone Administration TrainingDrug overdose is the leading cause of death in Americans under 50. In many cases lives could be saved if someone nearby had the education and ability to administer Naloxone. Naloxone is designed to rapidly reverse opioid overdose. It can quickly restore normal respiration to a person whose breathing has slowed or even stopped due to the overuse of heroin or prescription opioid pain medications.

Event Details:

WHAT: Opioid Overdose Response-Naloxone Administration Training
WHEN: Saturday May 4th 10:00AM – 11:00AM
WHERE: River Road Main Campus – Ishee Chapel

In 2018, over 1,500 Tenesseans were administered Narcan to reverse a potential drug overdose. Narcan can be a life saving medication for an addict in distress. The more public knowledge and accessibility the more lives can be saved.

Kaitlynn Jackson is a Regional Overdose Prevention Specialist with STARS. She will be facilitating an hour long training and providing free Narcan kits to attendees.
Kits include: 2 doses of Narcan, a pair of gloves, an instruction sheet, a card with a list of substance use treatment resources, and a reporting form for the state if the Narcan is used.

This event is FREE but RSVP is required to receive a Narcan kit. Please RSVP to Jaime Gibbons. Thank you, see you soon!.

Who should attend?

  • Employees of Heathcare or Mental Health facilities
  • Community members who come into contact with people at risk of overdose
  • Family & friends of people with Substance Use Disorder
  • Caregivers of the Elderly/Disabled
  • Anyone interested in saving a life

Below is the current Surgeon General’s Advisory regarding Naloxone and Opioid Overdose

“I, Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, VADM Jerome Adams, am emphasizing the importance of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone. For patients currently taking high doses of opioids as prescribed for pain, individuals misusing prescription opioids, individuals using illicit opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, health care practitioners, family and friends of people who have an opioid use disorder, and community members who come into contact with people at risk for opioid overdose, knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life.”

Training Objectives:

  1. Understand administration of naloxone products, including “Good Samaritan” protection law
  2. Recognize the signs of an opioid overdose and identify its causes and risks
  3. Describe what NOT to do during an opioid overdose
  4. Know the steps to follow when encountering an opioid overdose
  5. Earn a certificate of completion of naloxone administration training

parenting an addicted childParents battling addiction may lack the ability to provide structure and support for their children. This can be an incredibly stressful time, as children often do not understand why or how their parent became addicted to substances and often blame themselves. The National Association for Children of Alcoholics (NACA) notes that children face a number of stressors when parental addiction is involved, such as conflict within the home, increased isolation and decreased family cohesion. If you are a parent who has been working diligently in recovery and have reached a place where you want to reconnect with your child, you must realize that it will take time.

A study conducted at Western Sydney University in Australia emphasized the importance of empathy and emotion regulation when it comes to re-connecting with one’s child. There are three main aspects to this:

  • Cognitive empathy – being able to understand what your child may be going through and perceiving what his or her feelings may be
  • Emotional reactivity – the ability to respond emotionally to your child’s pain
  • Social skills – being able to gauge the effect of your behavior on your child and on others

Many 12-Step programs endorse this, but it’s important to admit to your child the pain you’ve caused them and explain that it wasn’t their fault. It will take time to rebuild trust, but acknowledging how you’ve affected them is a great place to start. As you work towards strengthening this relationship, maintain open communication and remind yourself to see things through your child’s point of view. They’re hurt and they may be very upset and unsure if they can trust you. This doesn’t mean that you can’t repair your relationship with them, it just means that you’ll have to prove to them – with your words and actions – that you are on the path of recovery and will be staying there.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

man with methamphetamine addictionThose with methamphetamine addiction may find difficulties with recognizing and predicting loss, as well as other efforts involved in decision making. Rita Goldstein, part of a research team that conducted a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience regarding how cocaine affects the brain, stated: “We see that everywhere, from basic survival – getting food and avoiding the poisonous stuff – to relationships and work in the modern world. If people cannot predict losses, their long-term planning…will be very different. This loss might be contributing a downward spiral in [those with addiction].”

In August of 2018, researchers from the University of California San Diego reviewed what has currently been done in our understanding of meth use and its effects on memory and learning thus far. The hippocampus in particular is a region of the brain that is responsible for memory storage, consolidation of memories and pulling long and short-term memories into recollection. When meth is used, an influx of dopamine (the “feel good” chemical), can actually alter the structure of the hippocampus as it stores memories of the substance and sparks cravings for it. As MethProject.org states, meth also affects the frontal lobe of the brain, which makes it more difficult for individuals to think rationally.

With such significant effects on the brain, can these damages be reversed?

It truly depends on the person and how severe their addiction is. The overall health of a person can definitely improve over time if recovery is maintained, but some functions may take a very long time (up to several years) or may not recover fully if the addiction was severe. If you or a loved one have battled meth addiction in the past, work towards recovery today. The sooner you begin the journey towards recovery, the sooner you can be on your way towards a healthier mind, body and spirit.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

teen with addictionIt is estimated that approximately 2 million children between the ages of 12 and 17 need treatment for substance abuse concerns. Teens and pre-teens have easier access to substances both in a physical sense and in a virtual sense, as the internet has also perpetuated substance-related activities. If you’re the parent of a teen with addiction, you’re going to find the struggle between ensuring their safety and opening up communication with them while also being firm and setting expectations.

It can be challenging to know what our teens need during this time, but CBS News suggests starting off with exactly what teens don’t need. Here are some parenting tips to avoid:

  1. Failing to tell your teen what you expect of them. Set the boundaries for your teen upon their return home so they know exactly what will and will not be tolerated.
  2. Ignoring your teen’s mental health issues. If you can tell they’re depressed, anxious or experience symptoms of a mental illness, make sure you take the steps necessary to get them additional help.
  3. Blaming yourself for their substance use. Stay focused on the present moment and the fact that your teen is recovering. Dwelling in the past will only hold you back.
  4. Setting a bad example. If your teen is recovering from alcohol, you certainly don’t want to drink around them. Show your teen what sober living is really about – and how much fun it can be, too.
  5. Don’t be judgmental. Set some ground rules, but don’t jump to further conclusions about what your teen will or will not do after they’ve been in recovery. They need your guidance – but they also need your faith right now.

Your teen has been working hard in recovery, but this transition back home is going to take some time and effort too. Don’t rush the process. Stay open and communicate often. Learn more about your teen and rebuild a life of recovery with them, one step at a time.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

Why Quitting Cold Turkey Could Mean Life or Death

“There are a lot better ways to do withdrawal than the way I did it…Because for me, quitting cold [turkey] led to a whole host of other behaviors that were – in many ways – more debilitating than opioid addiction.”

In a personal story shared on Vice, a woman shared her story with quitting opioid addiction “cold turkey”. We’ve all heard of this phrase and why do so many people do it? There are a number of reasons, but it could be due to financial strains, fear of what treatment might be like, lack of support, the idea of avoiding certain people or places or an overall belief that a person can “get over” addiction on their own. No matter the reason, it’s incredibly dangerous – and here’s why.

Each person’s medical and substance use history is different, which means that what worked for one person may not work for another. It’s a lot like medication – and assuming that recovery is a “one-size-fits-all” could place you in grave danger. Very Well Mind emphasizes that once the body is addicted to something, a quick, sudden drop in use could shock the system – leading a person to potentially experience seizures, heart problems and more. On top of that, not having the right structure and support to move forward with recovery can make it that much more tempting to use again if the withdrawal symptoms become too painful or uncomfortable.

Withdrawal may include shakiness, nausea, headaches, hallucinations, anxiety, depression and more, and if a person tries to use again, they often believe they can pick back up with the dose they left off; Sherry Benton, a professor of psychology at the University of Florida, told Vice that when this happens, a person’s tolerance has already lowered – and the larger dose taken is enough to kill a person.

By having a healthcare team available, a person is able to be monitored and assessed so they don’t experience further damage to their brain and body. This safety support network is crucial because it ensures that a person detoxes in the safest, most painless way possible.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

couple enjoying life after PTSD and addiction treatmentIt’s not uncommon that many of us just don’t realize just how fragile we really are. If we put this into perspective, it’s quite natural – as human beings, we have so many thoughts, feelings, decisions to make, relationships to maintain and circumstances that affect all of these and more. How could we not possibly be affected by them?! In previous decades, it was thought that expressing the pain, sadness, anger or other negative feeling could be seen as “weak”, but we’re now realizing that holding these feelings in are what can cause us poor health, isolation and a host of other issues.

If you’re in addiction recovery (or even mental illness recovery) right now, you’ve either already or will soon be exploring how your past has affected your present. This is probably something that most of us are familiar with and that’s because the people and circumstances in our lives often affect us so deeply that it drives us to self-harm, drink, abuse drugs and engage in other risky behaviors. Traumatic events make us particularly susceptible to drug abuse later on, as the aftermath of trauma can leave us with so many devastating thoughts, memories and nightmares that it can feel as though there’s no way out.

A 2017 study conducted in Canada sought to explore the connection between trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction by asking 132 participants in outpatient clinics to complete questionnaires. Of these participants, all had a history of addiction, and 87% met the criteria for PTSD. The researchers found that severity of PTSD symptoms was directly related to severity of addiction – why would this occur?

PTSD can be extremely difficult to live with, as the symptoms often include nightmares, paranoia, depression, anxiety, irritability, forgetfulness, difficulty concentrating and more. When every day presents itself with a number of these symptoms at varying intensities, it can have a significant effect on a person’s family, home and work life. For many people, they just want the pain to go away – and that’s when they turn to substances.

One person shared their personal experience of living with PTSD via the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA). Here is an excerpt from their story: “I lost all ability to concentrate or even complete simple tasks. Normally social, I stopped trying to make friends or get involved in my community. I often felt disoriented, forgetting where or who I was.”

Self-Medication: Trying to Find a Way Out

The truth is, as humans, we’re wired to find the easiest and most efficient ways out of our problems. When we’re going through some serious mental health turmoil, we often turn to the perceived easiest and most efficient route – for many people, scheduling an appointment and attending therapy isn’t at the top of the list, especially taking into consideration finances, resources, transportation, support needed and more. Substances, on the other hand, may seem easier to obtain, easier to take and faster-acting in terms of temporary relief. Quality is more important than quantity, however, and while substances may appear to save time, they’re unfortunately prolonging the symptoms we’re trying so hard to mask.

The reality is that self-medicating can’t solve our problems, it can only add to them. The emotional upheavals experienced through PTSD and other mental health conditions need to be worked through over time and the longer we hold them inside of ourselves, tucked away never to see the light, the longer we deprive ourselves of the healing and post-traumatic growth that we deserve. So many times, we try so desperately to find a quicker way out that makes sense, but we come to find that the long, arduous road of recovery is most worth it in the end.

Bessel van der Kolk, professor of psychiatry at Boston University, told Vice Magazine“Trauma is not a story about the past, it’s about how the past continues to live on in your body; that’s the core issue.”

Moving from Addiction to Recovery

While substances temporarily relieve the symptoms we experience, they cause our brain and body to become dependent on that “feel good” chemical called dopamine being released each time. We become dependent on the drug and later addicted. What many people find is that their problems never really left them – they just became distracted from those problems temporarily.

A study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review assessed the many factors that are needed for successful addiction recovery, especially when PTSD is involved. The authors talked about how much more important it’s becoming for healthcare teams to be “trauma-informed”, which means they take into consideration the amount of stress a person goes through when affected by a traumatic event.

A number of other factors were found to be very important for those in addiction recovery:

  • Focusing heavily on coping mechanisms for dealing with trauma and addiction
  • Using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an approach that helps people identity negative thought patterns and replace them with more positive, productive ones
  • Exposure therapy was found to be preferred
  • Different treatment options really help clients figure out what works best for them cost-effective wise, as well as based on their needs
  • PTSD can have a significantly impact on a person, but that doesn’t mean their life is over. Recovery is possible and while substances can’t “solve” these problems, time, therapy, healing and overall recovery can help a person make significant progress.

Cool Springs Treatment is a 12-Step based outpatient alcohol and drug rehabilitation program. Designed for individuals 18 and older, we strive for individualized, quality treatment to meet each person’s unique needs. Our outpatient program gives you just enough structure to really keep a firm grip on your recovery, while still allowing you the time to follow through with outside responsibilities such as family, school or work.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to get more information on seeking the help you need.

mother with an addicted childThe maternal bond is particularly unique, as previous research has shown us for years now that the way mothers bond with their babies (whether biologically or adopted) can have an effect on that child’s relational abilities with others up to decades later. While times have changed, mothers are still viewed as more nurturing to their child – and in American society, the maternal connection typically continues well into adulthood. It is throughout the middle and high school years that adolescents find themselves creating their own identities and paving their own path, but when addiction is involved, however, it becomes a different situation – how do mothers deal when their adolescent is abusing substances?

It’s certainly devastating to find out this type of situation and many mothers may find themselves wondering where to go next. In 2015, researchers published a study in the International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction to find out exactly what stressors mothers face when this situation arises – and how these stressors influenced their overall sense of wellbeing. They found several key themes from mothers’ narratives as they’ve witnessed their child go through addiction, such as:

  • Adolescent misconduct: many mothers reported that as their adolescent was struggling with addiction, they also acted out in many ways – this ultimately led to the mother’s experience of worry, anxiety, helplessness and shame
  • Family conflict: unhappiness and anger were reported as mothers experienced family conflict with their adolescent’s addiction. Some mothers also reported getting into arguments with their spouse over who was to blame for their child’s addiction.
  • Individual failure: all mothers interviewed expressed the fact that they felt guilty for their child’s addiction. One mother specifically stated, “I’m saying maybe I never taught Winston like uhm, ‘see what your brother is doing, don’t follow his footsteps’ you know?”

Some of the mothers expressed financial burdens as their child had damaged property or stolen things. Ultimately, it’s clear that mothers go through a lot of unique challenges as they witness their child navigate addiction and recovery. If you are a mother going through this yourself, know that you’re not alone. Seek help for your child and find a support group for yourself as well – it’s time to heal and move forward.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

What Can Hold a Family Back in Healing from Addiction?Substance abuse recovery isn’t an isolated disease; families, friends, coworkers and entire communities are affected by it. When a loved one has an addiction, sleeping and eating patterns typically change and they may start to look different. Weight loss may occur and suddenly all of their extra time is spent chasing after something other than what they would usually spend their time on. Some family members may find their roles changing within the family system as their loved one becomes more entrenched in the addiction’s hold.

Pain, frustration, guilt, anger, sadness, hopelessness and more are all emotions family members may experience. Even if the loved one seeks out recovery, many of these feelings will still remain for some time – the journey to healing from addiction is a long road, but it’s necessary in order for all family members to move forward with their lives in the healthiest of ways.

In 2016, researchers published a study in the journal Qualitative Health Research to identify some of the biggest challenges for parents in particular when their child entered addiction recovery.

Twenty-seven addiction professionals were interviewed and they learned that with their parent interactions, the following seemed to really hold them back from healing:

  • Lack of involvement in treatment
  • Over-involvement in treatment
  • Unrealistic expectations
  • Ambivalence or opposition to change
  • Ethical dilemmas
  • Alliance issues
  • Collaboration challenges with therapists

If these are the types of issues holding parents, caretakers and other family members back when it comes to recovery, what could promote their recovery?

A study published several years ago and written by researchers from the East Bay Community Recovery Project (EBCRP) in San Francisco, California identified some excellent protective factors to healing – both on the families’ side, and the individual’s side. Here are some of them listed: concrete support in time of need, an understanding and overall knowledge of parenting and child development, social and emotional competence of children (and, in this case, other family members, too), resiliency and building up social connections.

Al-Anon is an excellent peer-led support group specifically designed for friends and family members of those recovering from addiction. These groups can truly build a sense of support as well as a strengthened sense of spirituality. No matter what you’re going through, don’t give up hope. There are people out here who can support you, guide you and help you find healing amidst the pain.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

HIV and addictionDrug use is a major concern all around the world, and although we oft talk about the risks of substance abuse on one’s body, finances and relationships, there’s a topic that doesn’t get discussed as often: HIV. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2015, 6% of HIV diagnoses were attributed to injection drug use and they estimate that if these rates continue, 1 in 23 women who inject drugs and 1 in 36 men who inject drugs will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime. HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus and it can lead to AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) if not treated early on. HIV is a lifelong condition that attacks our body’s natural immune system making us more susceptible to cancer, infections and even death.

Much of what HIV/AIDS has been centered on is through unprotected sex, but there is a huge risk among those who inject drugs as well. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) emphasizes that using drugs can worsen HIV symptoms if a person already has it – thus making their brain and body more at risk for greater nerve cell injury and difficulties with thinking, learning and remembering. Avert, a website that provides global information and education on HIV and AIDS, states that those who use drugs are 22 times more likely to contract HIV/AIDS.

If this contraction is so dangerous and deadly, why don’t people who use drugs simply avoid sharing needles? Many people are unaware that they even have the virus and are uneducated about how likely they are to contract the virus from drug injecting. Furthermore, some instances make it more difficult for people to ensure sanitary precautions are taken with drug use. For example, one person told Avert, “When we [inject] drugs, we need to be quick. Police might come at any time. For that reason…we don’t mind sharing with others.”

Safe injection sites, increased access to treatment and more public information is being established in the United States to help combat some of the HIV/AIDS issue, but there is still a long way to go. Protect yourself and what’s even better – seek help when it’s needed. You are not alone and there are people here ready to help you.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

What Does It Mean?

When two disorders occur at the same time, it is called comorbidity, dual diagnosis or also co-occurring disorders. Each person’s experience with mental disorders and/or substance use disorders (SUDs) are different, which means that sometimes, one could occur before the other; on the other hand, one could exacerbate symptoms of another. It becomes tricky to safely manage both at the same time, which is why having a healthcare team could be the safest option for moving forward in recovery. According to a report published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, it’s not all that uncommon for a person to experience both a mental disorder, such as depression and an addiction, such as alcoholism, at the same time. In fact, previous research tells us that those with mood or anxiety disorders are twice as likely to abuse substances as well – why is this?

Masking the Symptoms with Substances: Self-Medication

When we’re caught in the whirlwind of life and symptoms of a mental illness arise, it makes sense that we’d do anything to make those symptoms go away. Just like most people don’t enjoy rushing to the doctor, however, many people try to “treat” their mental illness with something else – often substances – to mask the symptoms so they don’t cause as much distress. For example, a person who has social anxiety may begin feeling very nervous about meeting up with friends; by drinking alcohol often, they may feel that pressure to “fit in” or that overall nervousness fade away.

In fact, a 2016 study published by a researcher from Yale University found that many people choose alcohol or marijuana to self-medicate because they feel those are the least addictive substances to use; furthermore, they tend to feel as though they have more control over their substance use, and the effects are found more favorable as well. The problem with this, however, is that the brain is wired to feel good. We have a chemical in our brain called dopamine, and whenever something releases this chemical (such as food, sex, drugs, shopping, gambling, etc.), that memory gets stored as a pleasant one. It seems harmless at the time, but our brain remembers that moment and may recall it again – and that’s when the cycle of dependence and addiction begin.

Managing Both at Once: Tips for Recovery

Recovery is a courageous endeavor and one that could change your life for the better. There’s no one “right way” to recover, so you truly have to find what works best for you. For many people, however, recovery should include a strict schedule. Depression and substance dependence each tend to have their own competing schedules, but you are not your disorders – and you need to create a routine that continues no matter which disorder decides to butt in.

CBT

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can greatly help with both disorders. This type of therapy approach helps us to identify old, negative thought patterns, while giving us insight into how much importance we’re placing on those thoughts and if we really need to be giving them much importance considering the effect it’s having on our happiness and health. With CBT, we’re given the tools to identify which thoughts we’d like to place emphasis on – which ones will be most beneficial to us.

Nutrition/Exercise

Depression really manifests itself through low energy, irritability, sadness and hopelessness, isolation and more. On top of that, substance abuse can cause us to eat less (or eat more unhealthy foods), sleep less, exercise less and damage some of the vital organs that are used to absorb what nutrients we do obtain from our daily diet. Depression festers in its own way, which can even include difficulty with hygiene. Combine these effects with detoxification/addiction recovery and you may experience an aftermath that’s pretty uncomfortable – exercise and nutrition are what should be used to help counteract this.

In an article titled, “The Role of Nutrition in Recovery from Alcohol and Drug Addiction”, several key suggestions for nutrition were made:

  • Grains, fruits and vegetables
  • Tofu, kale and other foods rich in calcium (including dairy products)
  • Meat, fish or tofu for protein
  • Good fatty oils such as canola, olive, flaxseed

Spirituality

Despite the way depression or detox make be causing you to feel, you need to surround yourself with love, positivity, support and hope. Research has shown us time and time again that these elements bring back our livelihood – they connect us to something bigger than ourselves. They help us find our bigger purpose in life and in doing so, can help us move forward from some of the emotional wounds we’ve developed over the years. Mahatma Gandhi expressed this very notion when he once stated, “We cannot, in a moment, get rid of habits of a lifetime.”

The emotional walls we’ve put up, the way we’ve closed ourselves in, the opportunities we’ve passed, the loved ones we’ve hurt and the substances we’ve relied on can only be healed by choosing to move forward and spirituality can help us understand just how little control we have over the world. By connecting with God, or a Higher Power, we can find strength in knowing that we’re exactly where we need to be – one step at a time.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.


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