Tag Archives: Heal

Tag Archives: Heal


“Every Brilliant Thing” – Alumni Relations March Event

Event:

“Every Brilliant Thing” by Duncan Macmillian, with Jonny Donahoe
This one-woman play depicts a daughter who learns as a child that her mother has been hospitalized for doing, as her father puts it, “something stupid.” She resolves to show her mother that life is worth living, by writing a list of 1,000 brilliant things and leaving them on scraps of paper for her mother to find.

Details:

Description:

“Every Brilliant Thing” offers an unflinching view of chronic depression and the lengths we will go to for those we love. Far from being sad or tragic, the play approaches the topic with love and sincerity, with hope and even humor. This unique theater experience involves the audience in the story, evoking empathy, tears, laughter, insight and deep compassion.
After the show, a panel featuring Cumberland Heights staff & alumni will discuss the impact of mental illness on the family.

Tickets:

Alumni Event Registration & Ticket Purchase

  • STEP 1 - Personal Information

    The cost is $8.00 per person. Please also provide your name, email, cell & credit card information to hold your reservation. Please note tickets are non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund.

  • Ticket price total: .00

  • STEP 2 - Credit Card and Billing Information

    We accept MasterCard VISA American Express & Discover

    There is a required of $8.00 reservation per person that is non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund. Please fill out your credit card number, expiration month and year, CVN number and billing address to where your credit card statement is sent below.

If you talk to anyone who has worked with James Luna during his tenure at Cumberland Heights, you’ll hear all kinds of anecdotes about his impact and personality. There is one theme you’ll hear over and over – that James was a no-nonsense kind of guy. In recovery, James often told people things they didn’t want to hear but needed to. It always came from a place of love.

Remembering Our Friend, James Luna
Remembering Our Friend, James Luna
James was Clinical Director of the Men’s Program for 19 years. As his obituary states “His own personal recovery, that spanned decades, was paralleled only by the love and energy he put into patients and friends alike struggling with alcohol and drug addictions. His life’s work will be remembered by the thousands he touched who are now, in turn, helping others themselves.”

Cumberland Heights Board Member Rob Crichton had this to say about James:

“I first met James Luna 31 years ago. James was quite a force at Friendship House. I suppose you could put him in the category of the ‘tough love’ type. Staying sober and participating in the program was top priority. He introduced me to a rather rough looking fellow in the coffee bar at 202 one afternoon and informed me I was going to be his sponsor. What an experience. James was emphatic to put it mildly. He also called it like he saw it in the meetings, not cross talking, but he always let you know where he stood. I admired his AA orthodoxy especially in a meeting.”

Many years later I became reacquainted with James after he became employed at Cumberland Heights, but something had changed. James was much more mellow. The rough edges seemed to have smoothed out. I cannot tell you how this happened. Perhaps it was his marriage to Dawn or being in the Cumberland environment, but he had transformed into a much gentler person. We worked on two projects together at Cumberland Heights and I felt totally comfortable around him. It felt like we were beginning to be friends.

“One thing is for certain in my experience – James Luna was always a good man regardless what chapter of life he was in.”

Vivian Jo Bell, who works in Medical Records said, “I found him to be direct, honest, grateful and compassionate. My favorite memory of James is 22 years ago. I was diagnosed with cancer. James Luna was the first person to come to me just to talk and offer prayers.”

Our Chief Clinical Officer Cinde Stewart Freeman had this to say about James:

“I met James during my first 60 days in recovery. I didn’t know how to talk to people and I was afraid this recovery thing wouldn’t work for me. James caught my attention in meetings because he spoke rarely, concisely, and always something that rang as true to me. During a day that I was really struggling, I got my nerve up and asked the $1,000,000 question. ‘James, how do you get faith?’ I think my voice was shaking; I know my hands still were. I thought he was going to give me a mystical and deeply theological answer that would change my world. He looked at me closely and then simply said, ‘Well, Cinde, you lived through things that you thought you couldn’t live through, and when you look back, you realize that God helped you. That’s how you get faith.’ At the time, it seemed too easy to be true and much too simple. As the years have gone by, James and I have had many conversations about God and the nature of spirituality.  I learned so much wisdom from him. But I am not sure that anything he taught me was as powerful as that first simple truth a truth that turned out to be mystical, deeply theological, and that did indeed change my world. Godspeed, my friend. I love you.”

James had a way with words, both spoken and on paper. You may be one of the millions who read his articles on Grapevine, AA’s monthly publication.  And few could forget his goodbye letter to Cumberland Heights when he retired in 2012.

It read in part:

 “To have been allowed a minor part in this unfolding passion play of God after his wounded and devastated children for the past 25 years has been, for me, nothing short of…words are often insufficient in this realm. Fortunately, God has languages that need no words.”

A Life Celebration will be held for James Saturday, Oct. 20 at 2:30 p.m. at Harpeth Hills Funeral Home and Cremation Center. A reception will follow at The Pavilion.

Learn more about James Luna’s life and legacy by reading his obituary.

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Addiction Affects the Entire Family

Addiction is a family disease that stresses the family to the breaking point, impacts the stability of the home, the family’s unity, mental health, physical health, finances, and overall family dynamics.

Join us to learn about how your family might be affected and what you can do to support yourself, your family and your loved ones who may be struggling with substance use.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: AGAPE Center – 4555 Trousdale Drive, Nashville, TN 37204
DATE: October 25, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 7:30PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT THE ORGANIZER:

The mission of Cumberland Heights is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by drugs and alcohol. Addiction is a chronic, progressive, and potentially fatal disease. We carefully provide the highest quality care for adults, adolescents, and families who suffer from, or are affected by, this devastating disease.

Healing from Addictions, Cravings, and Choiceless Behaviors

A Workshop for Those Who Suffer and for Those Who Love Them

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent CommunicationIn an ideal world, our emotional needs are met with warmth and understanding from the earliest age. For many of us, this is not the case. Instead we experience loneliness, internal conflicts and overwhelming emotional pain. Addictions and choiceless behaviors often become the brain’s creative strategies for survival.

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, will teach us how to disentangle nervous system wiring which keeps us locked in these unhealthy patterns. Join us to experience the way Sarah’s innovative work can support the healing process.

Workshop Details:

Workshop pricing: Early-bird $225; after August 1st $275


REGISTER NOW


During the workshop, we will explore:

  • The connection between the latest brain research and the “decisions” we make that lead us toward and away from addictions and compulsions;
  • How to counteract old patterns to support healthy decision making;
  • How to leverage our own empathy skills to bring ourselves relief

If this workshop appeals to you and cost is the only barrier, please contact Melissa Red to discuss how we can help support your attendance.

Workshop site/venue:

United Methodist Publishing HouseUnited Methodist Publishing House
2222 Rosa L. Parks Blvd.
Nashville, TN 37228

(A short distance north of downtown Nashville — 3 miles — with plenty of free parking)

Workshop Dates:

Date and Times: September 22/23, 2018

  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 
    Family Constellations (optional; no additional fee)
  • Sunday, September 23, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop presenter:

Sarah Peyton speaks and writes internationally on the confluence of NVC, Family Constellation work and the world of neuroscience research. Author of the recently published book, Your Resonant Self: Guided Meditations and Exercises to Engage Your Brain’s Capacity for Healing, Sarah has a passion for weaving together neuroscience knowledge and experiences of healing to support brain and body connection. Funny, touching, and filled with personal stories and up-to-date research on our nervous systems, her presentations change lives and invite the healing and self-compassion that comes from hearing ourselves and others deeply. For more information about Sarah see www.empathybrain.com.

Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights invites to join us for an experiential activity and a day of fellowship experiencing emotions in a dynamic way! The Alumni Ropes Day consists of both low and high rope elements and processes. These experiential activities place the participant in scenarios, often outside of comfort zones, that allow emergence of a core truth about themselves. Concepts of powerlessness, surrender, keeping it simple, honesty, courage, community support, trust, faith, and many others emerge. The participant is able to draw parallels and metaphors from their experience then transfer it to practical application to their recovery journey.

What: Recover Trust: Alumni Ropes Day (Boxed Lunch Included)
When: Saturday, April 21 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (DATE CHANGED DUE TO RAIN)
Where: Cumberland Heights Alumni Pavilion
Details: Must RSVP below by April 18 (limited space, register your spot now!)

Please wear comfortable clothing and closed toe shoes. Boxed lunches will be provided.
All participants will sign a waiver and must be over the age of 18

This event is always a blast, be sure you register early! Plus check out some photos from our past years Alumni Ropes Day.

Cumberland Heights’ programming is based on the principles of the 12 Steps of recovery. Each month we ask a member of our expert staff to share his or her experience on a specific Step. This month Spiritual Directors Angela Moscheo Benson, M. Div. MA and Stan Bumgarner M. Div. LADAC will focus on Step Two: Came to believe a power greater than ourselves can restore us to sanity.

Angela Moscheo Benson, M. Div. MA

My first sponsor asked me to define each word in each Step we were working. Working through the definitions for Step Two brought my attention to the word sanity: the ability to think and behave in a normal and rational manner. I remember reading that definition only to laugh out loud at how far from sane my ability to think was in that moment. It’s almost impossible to think back on the roar of distortion in my head the first time I worked Steps One through Three. I lump them together because I recommit to them every day, and right in the middle is the all-important recognition of the need for help.

Step Two is all about asking for help.  Sure, it’s also about understanding how our own best thinking got us here, but logically we need something outside of ourselves if we want to change.

There is an awareness which occurs in an honest working of Step One that leads me to a place of acceptance in Step Two. It’s as if the shift of perception leads to a shift in attitude, but that isn’t necessarily true. Unless we are willing to believe in something greater, the shift in awareness isn’t enough. At its core, Step Two asks us to move from the powerlessness we felt in Step One to a place of hope that change is possible.  Like it says in the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, “We perceive that only through utter defeat are we able to take our first steps toward liberation.” Most often liberation comes with the strength we receive from a Higher Power, but only if we’re open to the possibility of a restorative Power and are willing to ask that Power for help. For some, that Power is found in the other people in the rooms, but for me, that Power is a caring God who wants to help me recover my true spiritual nature. I may be powerless, but I’m not without help.


Stan Bumgarner M. Div. LADAC

Step Two is the natural progression of having worked Step One. In Step One we admit no matter how hard we try to stop, moderate, or control our drinking or drug use, we can’t do it. And as a result, our lives are not turning out the way we want.

The reasonable conclusion from working Step One is, “If I can’t figure this out on my own, then I need help, and it’s going to have come from something much wiser than I am and much bigger and stronger than alcohol and drugs.”

Working Step Two does not necessarily mean we must embrace the capital “G” God as the power greater than ourselves. Although many people are comfortable with this concept of Higher Power, there are also those who aren’t. And that’s completely acceptable.

For recovery newcomers, it may be more effective to have a tangible power greater than themselves in the form of the 12-Step recovery process, the 12-Step Recovery community, and a caring, present sponsor.

The essence of Step Two is recognizing and coming to believe two key concepts: 1. I can’t seem to figure it out because my addiction is bigger than I am; and 2. For me to survive and turn my life around I need help, and the help I get is going to have to be more powerful than my addiction.

Step Two is critically important because it sets the stage for all the other steps. Until we finally come to believe we need help, we won’t ask for it. Until we ask for help, we won’t experience the sense of hope and promise offered by working the remaining Steps.

Cumberland Heights Family Education Program – “Help When You Need It”

The Coalition LogoDeaths from overdose are rising in all 50 states. Drugs are now the number one cause of accidental death. Narcotic addiction creates changes to the brain that merit the need for therapy. Almost all people suffering from addiction to drugs, of any kind, require assistance to get their lives back on track.

WHAT: Cumberland Heights Family Education Program – “Help When You Need It”
WHEN: Saturday, March 3, 2018 from 12:00PM – 2:00PM
WHERE: Cumberland Heights Sumner County ORC 1531 Hunt Club Blvd, Suite 300, Gallatin, TN 37066

Cumberland Heights is proud to partner with the Sumner County Anti Drug Coalition to provide both prevention information and resources for treatment. Please join us to learn more about prevention and treatment of substance use disorders.

When I was discharged from Cumberland Heights I knew one thing for certain…treatment may have been complete, but recovery was just beginning. Today, there are many ways I’m active in my recovery and one of the most rewarding is what I’m able to do for others. Service work is an integral part of what keeps me sober one day at a time. Each simple act keeps me out of my own head long enough to focus on another individual or group’s recovery. I’m not seeking recognition, only trying to make someone else’s journey in sobriety a little easier. And while focusing on someone else, something magical happens…people begin to recover together.

With this in mind, here are 10 ways to be of service to others in recovery:

1) Sponsorship – Becoming a sponsor is the ultimate way one person suffering from addiction can help another. A sponsor gives his or her time; meeting sponsees to help them work the steps, to ferret out the root causes of his or her addiction, and develop a deeper relationship with a Higher Power of their understanding.

2) Be a sober contact – Newly recovering people are always encouraged to get as many phone numbers as they can so they’ll have plenty of people to call when they’re triggered to use or drink. Being the person on the other end of the call can save a life.

3) Take meetings to detox units – I’ll never forget the first message of recovery, strength and hope I heard was in a detox unit at a local hospital. Providing this vital area of service work, you can inspire hope in someone about a program with the potential to change their life for the better.

4) Chair 12-Step meetings – A certain amount of responsibility comes along with steering the ship at a 12-Step meeting. The chair passes out the readings, and often, chooses the topic of discussion. This role serves every person attending.

5) Attend business meetings – Each home group has a meeting set aside to discuss financial details: bills for rent, items needed for purchase such as soft drinks; and the collections to pay for expenses. This is a good way to serve the home group.

6) Greet people – Making someone feel welcome in a 12-Step meeting is a wonderful way to give back. Shaking hands, taking an interest in a newcomer, offering a smile or a friendly hello can be the one thing someone needed to hear to come back to another meeting.

7) Clean up – Each month my home group assigns someone to clean up our meeting place. Wiping off tables, sweeping floors and cleaning up the facility to keep it nice for our meetings is one way to get out of ourselves and help others.

8) Offer transportation to meetings – In recovery finding our way to meetings is our responsibility. However, some provide rides as service work. I was blessed enough to have someone who helped me get to meetings when I couldn’t drive.

9) Participate in fundraising – A clubhouse where I got sober recently held a yard sale. Providing clothing, tagging items or volunteering time at an event like this are all ways to provide service work.

10) Host sober activities – A common complaint among someone new in recovery is that they don’t know how to have fun without substances. Hosting an event for sober people to have a bonfire, barbecue, movie night, canoe or camping trip; or just a gathering to walk together downtown is more helpful than you might realize.


10 Ways to be of Service to Others in RecoveryKatrina Cornwell is a case manager at Cumberland Heights, a motivational speaker, blogger and three-time, first-place award winner in the annual Tennessee Press Association contest.

In her presentations, she speaks about her addiction to drugs and alcohol and how those habits led to a drunk driving accident which killed a man in October 2009.

In the days and weeks after leaving Cumberland Heights for a new adventure in early recovery, I discovered I was painfully shy when it came to meeting new people in the rooms.

Initially this made it difficult for me to make the meaningful connections so necessary for someone in early recovery to achieve and maintain sobriety.

I was afraid of them. I was afraid of me. I was afraid to be vulnerable enough to let anyone see how much I was hurting over what I’d done and how I’d hurt others and myself through my actions.

So, I went to the meetings, kept to myself and left immediately after for many weeks isolating myself in the crowds of recovering people. I warmed up slowly to the people in the AA groups I attended. I paid attention in particular to the women who demonstrated the kind of recovery I wanted to emulate.

One day, I stepped outside of my comfort zone and walked up to a woman I had grown to admire very much for the way she worked the program. I asked her to be my sponsor. Although she was not able to accommodate me, she connected me with a lady who became my sponsor and devoted friend for more than six years. Although she is not my sponsor now, she remains one of my most trusted friends in recovery.

Katrina Cornwell with members of her recovery community.
Katrina Cornwell with members of her recovery community.

Finding a sponsor who I could trust with my deepest darkest secrets, someone whom I could count upon to be my spiritual guide through the 12 Steps was another way I grew in recovery.

Working the steps with my sponsor solidified our commitment to each other, helping each other stay sober one day at a time, spending time together and staying in the literature.

I remember so clearly sitting down with her for my fifth step, not knowing how long it would take or what her reaction to all of my heinous sins would be. Never did she wince or cast a judging glance, she just loved me. She helped me grow until I became strong enough to reach out my hand to help someone else.

My sponsor took me to AA meetings, went to dinner with me and to the movies. She wrote a letter to the judge in my case. She even testified on my behalf at court twice. It was a connection like no other in the program, and it is vital to the successful recovery of the newly recovering alcoholic or addict.

Establishing this relationship in recovery helped make me the woman I am today.


K HeadshotKatrina Cornwell is a case manager at Cumberland Heights, a motivational speaker, blogger and three-time, first-place award winner in the annual Tennessee Press Association contest.

In her presentations, she speaks about her addiction to drugs and alcohol and how those habits led to a drunk driving accident which killed a man in October 2009.

Cumberland Heights Blog: Ready to Launch: Forming the Right Relationships in Recovery

I’m not what you would call an “outdoorsy” type, but six years into my recovery I stood on the side of a mountain in southeast Tennessee waiting for my boyfriend, Guy, to jump off. Somehow Guy talked me into watching he and his friends hang glide. For anyone not familiar with this sport, it’s basically jumping off a cliff with a giant kite on your back and hoping air currents will help you to the ground—without dying.

There was a ramp protruding off the side of the mountain, and I held my breath as Guy stepped onto it. Two of his friends checked every inch of his contraption—how the struts were placed along the wings, how he was strapped into the harness, how the bar in front which is supposed to control the direction of this thing was working—and gave him the “Ready to Launch” sign.

Guy stepped to the very edge of the ramp—the place where it looked like the sky met earth – and I was certain sure he was going to fall to his death. His buddies, who were crazy as well, stepped to the edge with him and each held one end of the vast wings. Suddenly, with a warrior’s whoop, Guy jumped off the cliff.

Immediately, the hang glider sank, and I couldn’t see him anymore. I knew this was a bad idea! Then a mystical, magical, some might even say miraculous, sight appeared…This giant kite, with my boyfriend still securely in place, began rising and floating through the air, over fields and ponds, and people—all of the life of the valley spread out below.

I raced to the truck and swiftly drove to the landing field where I arrived in time to watch him slowly circle and sink until his feet hit the ground running and he brought the kite to a stop. I was amazed.

Now, 24 years later, I’ve watched him do this many times. At some point in our journey it occurred to me hang gliding is a metaphor for recovery and the life changing relationships developed in recovery.

  • Although each of us is responsible for our own recovery, none of us can do it alone. We need those people who help us into our recovery hang glider—the nurses, doctors, counselors and loved ones who help us get treatment.
  • We need those people who will check our recovery equipment– ask us questions– the right questions. Are we going to meetings? Have a home group? A sponsor? Are we working the steps? Helping others? Doing service?
  • And we need those special few who will walk to the edge of the cliffs–of crisis, depression, despair, whatever comes–and encourage us to take that leap of faith.

We take that leap of faith out into the void only because others have helped us. And time and time again, the breath of a power greater than ourselves catches us, and we rise.


2010 CSF Headshot sm 2Cinde Stewart Freeman is Cumberland Heights’ Chief Clinical Officer and has been with Cumberland Heights for 25 years. During her tenure Cinde has served in nursing, clinical management and administrative roles.

Cinde is a bachelor’s prepared nurse with a master’s degree in counseling. She served on the Board of Directors at both AWARE and Thistle Farms. Cinde has developed and presented professional trainings on a wide variety of clinical skills, as well as process improvement, clinical supervision, and workplace wellness. She is an Oral Examiner for the Tennessee Board of Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors and a Qualified Clinical Supervisor for the LADAC.


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