Tag Archives: Heal

Tag Archives: Heal


The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

Generations of well-intentioned professionals have driven home the message to parents of those affected by addiction, “there’s nothing you can do until your child is ready to get help.” The person with addiction is powerless over drugs, alcohol and their disease, but that doesn’t mean that they are powerless over everything. Similarly, parents are powerless over their child and addiction, but they aren’t powerless over everything either.

Objectives for Participants are to:

  • Review The Stages of Change Model
  • Explore the Implications of Action-Ready Parents with Non-action-ready Children with Addiction
  • Identify at least 5 Opportunities for Action-Ready Parents
  • Identify at least 5 Opportunities for Professionals Serving Families Affected by Addiction

About Ginny Mills:

Ginny Mills joined the addiction recovery field over 25 years ago and now leads both Parenting Through Addiction (a web-based education & consultation service) and Full Life Counseling and Recovery (an outpatient private practice) in Winston-Salem, NC. She holds a master’s degree from Wake Forest University and credentials in both general mental health and addiction counseling.

Ginny has experience leading in primary residential, sober living and outpatient addiction treatment settings, including service as the Chief Clinical Officer for Partnership for a Drug-Free NC, She has a strong understanding of both the clinical and parental aspects of supporting those affected by the disease of addiction. Ginny loves to scuba dive, travel and ski with her husband and adult daughters (one of whom is in sustained recovery).

This fall, Ginny will release her new book Parenting Through Your Adult Child’s Addiction: Making Sense of Treatment, Aftercare and Recovery Recommendations.

PLEASE NOTE: There are 2 Sessions are available for convenience, you do not need to attend both.

  • Session One: 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM (registration begins at 8:30 AM)
  • Session Two: 1:00 PM-4:00 PM (registration begins at 12:30 PM)

3 CE credits awarded, approved by NAADAC and NBCC

 

REGISTER HERE

Training Dates: October 27-29, 2019
Advanced Training Day: The Music Industry: October 30, 2019 with Harold Owens (MusiCares)
*check training prerequisites

REGISTER HERE

This educational program was created and written as the most comprehensive training for individuals interested in becoming a professional in the supportive role of a mentor, coach or companion to someone that is in the early stages of recovery from a substance use and/or mental health disorder.

Providing the theoretical basis, ethical standards, and practical skills required for services offered by Recovery Specialists and Peer Recovery Specialists is the primary goal of this program.

The coursework is delivered as a combination of independent study, classroom instruction and consultation. Educational components of this program include:

  1. The Ethical Role & Responsibility of Recovery Specialists
  2. Developing the Skills and Tools of Recovery Specialists
  3. Providing Safe Passage (transports)
  4. History and Evolution of the Recovery Specialist
  5. Composition of Recovery Plans Practical Application and Role Play

WHO CAN BECOME A RECOVERY SPECIALIST?

This unmatched training opportunity is designed for every recovery professional including:

  • Direct Care Staff Discharge
  • Planner Admissions Personnel
  • Sober Companion / Coach Transports

Recovery Specialist is defined as an individual who provides one on one client and family services within a treatment setting and/or client’s home, community or travel travel and has completed the accredited training offered by IRI.

Music and the Brain Workshop with John McAndrewRecent studies show that music has healing effects as well as triggering effects for those in recovery from co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders. When we hear music, dopamine is released in the brain that creates pleasure. However, we know that memories are associated with music, which can trigger happiness or trauma. This session will review music and music therapies that are applied in a variety of treatment settings to bring about therapeutic change. Presenter John McAndrew will perform several compositions to describe the events in recovery that make a difference for people with substance use disorders, and dual diagnosis disorders.

Event Details:

WHAT: Music and the Brain Workshop
WHERE: Scarritt Bennett Center – 1027 18th Avenue South, Nashville TN 37212 – Laskey Welcome Center (2nd Floor-Laskey B)
WHEN: Friday, August 16, 2019
Registration/Breakfast: 8:30AM
Workshop: 9:00AM – 11:00AM
COST: $30.00 CEUs, $15.00 General Admission (Breakfast is included for all registrations)

REGISTER HERE

Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Define how music affects brain function in three different ways
  2. Describe how tonality is linked to emotions
  3. Experience a demonstration of how the brain predicts music and its effects on emotions

“Every Brilliant Thing” – Alumni Relations March Event

Event:

“Every Brilliant Thing” by Duncan Macmillian, with Jonny Donahoe
This one-woman play depicts a daughter who learns as a child that her mother has been hospitalized for doing, as her father puts it, “something stupid.” She resolves to show her mother that life is worth living, by writing a list of 1,000 brilliant things and leaving them on scraps of paper for her mother to find.

Details:

Description:

“Every Brilliant Thing” offers an unflinching view of chronic depression and the lengths we will go to for those we love. Far from being sad or tragic, the play approaches the topic with love and sincerity, with hope and even humor. This unique theater experience involves the audience in the story, evoking empathy, tears, laughter, insight and deep compassion.
After the show, a panel featuring Cumberland Heights staff & alumni will discuss the impact of mental illness on the family.

Tickets:

Alumni Event Registration & Ticket Purchase

  • STEP 1 - Personal Information

    The cost is $10.00 per person/ticket. Please also provide your name, email, cell & credit card information to hold your reservation. Please note tickets are non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund.

  • Ticket price total: .00

  • STEP 2 - Credit Card and Billing Information

    We accept MasterCard VISA American Express & Discover

    There is a required of $8.00 reservation per person that is non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund.

    Please fill out your name, credit card number, expiration month and year, and mailing address.

If you talk to anyone who has worked with James Luna during his tenure at Cumberland Heights, you’ll hear all kinds of anecdotes about his impact and personality. There is one theme you’ll hear over and over – that James was a no-nonsense kind of guy. In recovery, James often told people things they didn’t want to hear but needed to. It always came from a place of love.

Remembering Our Friend, James Luna
Remembering Our Friend, James Luna
James was Clinical Director of the Men’s Program for 19 years. As his obituary states “His own personal recovery, that spanned decades, was paralleled only by the love and energy he put into patients and friends alike struggling with alcohol and drug addictions. His life’s work will be remembered by the thousands he touched who are now, in turn, helping others themselves.”

Cumberland Heights Board Member Rob Crichton had this to say about James:

“I first met James Luna 31 years ago. James was quite a force at Friendship House. I suppose you could put him in the category of the ‘tough love’ type. Staying sober and participating in the program was top priority. He introduced me to a rather rough looking fellow in the coffee bar at 202 one afternoon and informed me I was going to be his sponsor. What an experience. James was emphatic to put it mildly. He also called it like he saw it in the meetings, not cross talking, but he always let you know where he stood. I admired his AA orthodoxy especially in a meeting.”

Many years later I became reacquainted with James after he became employed at Cumberland Heights, but something had changed. James was much more mellow. The rough edges seemed to have smoothed out. I cannot tell you how this happened. Perhaps it was his marriage to Dawn or being in the Cumberland environment, but he had transformed into a much gentler person. We worked on two projects together at Cumberland Heights and I felt totally comfortable around him. It felt like we were beginning to be friends.

“One thing is for certain in my experience – James Luna was always a good man regardless what chapter of life he was in.”

Vivian Jo Bell, who works in Medical Records said, “I found him to be direct, honest, grateful and compassionate. My favorite memory of James is 22 years ago. I was diagnosed with cancer. James Luna was the first person to come to me just to talk and offer prayers.”

Our Chief Clinical Officer Cinde Stewart Freeman had this to say about James:

“I met James during my first 60 days in recovery. I didn’t know how to talk to people and I was afraid this recovery thing wouldn’t work for me. James caught my attention in meetings because he spoke rarely, concisely, and always something that rang as true to me. During a day that I was really struggling, I got my nerve up and asked the $1,000,000 question. ‘James, how do you get faith?’ I think my voice was shaking; I know my hands still were. I thought he was going to give me a mystical and deeply theological answer that would change my world. He looked at me closely and then simply said, ‘Well, Cinde, you lived through things that you thought you couldn’t live through, and when you look back, you realize that God helped you. That’s how you get faith.’ At the time, it seemed too easy to be true and much too simple. As the years have gone by, James and I have had many conversations about God and the nature of spirituality.  I learned so much wisdom from him. But I am not sure that anything he taught me was as powerful as that first simple truth a truth that turned out to be mystical, deeply theological, and that did indeed change my world. Godspeed, my friend. I love you.”

James had a way with words, both spoken and on paper. You may be one of the millions who read his articles on Grapevine, AA’s monthly publication.  And few could forget his goodbye letter to Cumberland Heights when he retired in 2012.

It read in part:

 “To have been allowed a minor part in this unfolding passion play of God after his wounded and devastated children for the past 25 years has been, for me, nothing short of…words are often insufficient in this realm. Fortunately, God has languages that need no words.”

A Life Celebration will be held for James Saturday, Oct. 20 at 2:30 p.m. at Harpeth Hills Funeral Home and Cremation Center. A reception will follow at The Pavilion.

Learn more about James Luna’s life and legacy by reading his obituary.

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Addiction Affects the Entire Family

Addiction is a family disease that stresses the family to the breaking point, impacts the stability of the home, the family’s unity, mental health, physical health, finances, and overall family dynamics.

Join us to learn about how your family might be affected and what you can do to support yourself, your family and your loved ones who may be struggling with substance use.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: AGAPE Center – 4555 Trousdale Drive, Nashville, TN 37204
DATE: October 25, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 7:30PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT THE ORGANIZER:

The mission of Cumberland Heights is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by drugs and alcohol. Addiction is a chronic, progressive, and potentially fatal disease. We carefully provide the highest quality care for adults, adolescents, and families who suffer from, or are affected by, this devastating disease.

Healing from Addictions, Cravings, and Choiceless Behaviors

A Workshop for Those Who Suffer and for Those Who Love Them

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent CommunicationIn an ideal world, our emotional needs are met with warmth and understanding from the earliest age. For many of us, this is not the case. Instead we experience loneliness, internal conflicts and overwhelming emotional pain. Addictions and choiceless behaviors often become the brain’s creative strategies for survival.

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, will teach us how to disentangle nervous system wiring which keeps us locked in these unhealthy patterns. Join us to experience the way Sarah’s innovative work can support the healing process.

Workshop Details:

Workshop pricing: Early-bird $225; after August 1st $275


REGISTER NOW


During the workshop, we will explore:

  • The connection between the latest brain research and the “decisions” we make that lead us toward and away from addictions and compulsions;
  • How to counteract old patterns to support healthy decision making;
  • How to leverage our own empathy skills to bring ourselves relief

If this workshop appeals to you and cost is the only barrier, please contact Melissa Red to discuss how we can help support your attendance.

Workshop site/venue:

United Methodist Publishing HouseUnited Methodist Publishing House
2222 Rosa L. Parks Blvd.
Nashville, TN 37228

(A short distance north of downtown Nashville — 3 miles — with plenty of free parking)

Workshop Dates:

Date and Times: September 22/23, 2018

  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 
    Family Constellations (optional; no additional fee)
  • Sunday, September 23, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop presenter:

Sarah Peyton speaks and writes internationally on the confluence of NVC, Family Constellation work and the world of neuroscience research. Author of the recently published book, Your Resonant Self: Guided Meditations and Exercises to Engage Your Brain’s Capacity for Healing, Sarah has a passion for weaving together neuroscience knowledge and experiences of healing to support brain and body connection. Funny, touching, and filled with personal stories and up-to-date research on our nervous systems, her presentations change lives and invite the healing and self-compassion that comes from hearing ourselves and others deeply. For more information about Sarah see www.empathybrain.com.

Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights invites to join us for an experiential activity and a day of fellowship experiencing emotions in a dynamic way! The Alumni Ropes Day consists of both low and high rope elements and processes. These experiential activities place the participant in scenarios, often outside of comfort zones, that allow emergence of a core truth about themselves. Concepts of powerlessness, surrender, keeping it simple, honesty, courage, community support, trust, faith, and many others emerge. The participant is able to draw parallels and metaphors from their experience then transfer it to practical application to their recovery journey.

What: Alumni Ropes Day & Escape Game (Boxed Lunch Included)
When: Saturday, April 27 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where: Cumberland Heights Alumni Pavilion
Details: Limited space, register your spot now! RSVP to Jaime_Gibbons@cumberlandheights.org

Please wear comfortable clothing and closed toe shoes. Boxed lunches will be provided.
All participants will sign a waiver and must be over the age of 18

Cumberland Heights’ programming is based on the principles of the 12 Steps of recovery. Each month we ask a member of our expert staff to share his or her experience on a specific Step. This month Spiritual Directors Angela Moscheo Benson, M. Div. MA and Stan Bumgarner M. Div. LADAC will focus on Step Two: Came to believe a power greater than ourselves can restore us to sanity.

Angela Moscheo Benson, M. Div. MA

My first sponsor asked me to define each word in each Step we were working. Working through the definitions for Step Two brought my attention to the word sanity: the ability to think and behave in a normal and rational manner. I remember reading that definition only to laugh out loud at how far from sane my ability to think was in that moment. It’s almost impossible to think back on the roar of distortion in my head the first time I worked Steps One through Three. I lump them together because I recommit to them every day, and right in the middle is the all-important recognition of the need for help.

Step Two is all about asking for help.  Sure, it’s also about understanding how our own best thinking got us here, but logically we need something outside of ourselves if we want to change.

There is an awareness which occurs in an honest working of Step One that leads me to a place of acceptance in Step Two. It’s as if the shift of perception leads to a shift in attitude, but that isn’t necessarily true. Unless we are willing to believe in something greater, the shift in awareness isn’t enough. At its core, Step Two asks us to move from the powerlessness we felt in Step One to a place of hope that change is possible.  Like it says in the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, “We perceive that only through utter defeat are we able to take our first steps toward liberation.” Most often liberation comes with the strength we receive from a Higher Power, but only if we’re open to the possibility of a restorative Power and are willing to ask that Power for help. For some, that Power is found in the other people in the rooms, but for me, that Power is a caring God who wants to help me recover my true spiritual nature. I may be powerless, but I’m not without help.


Stan Bumgarner M. Div. LADAC

Step Two is the natural progression of having worked Step One. In Step One we admit no matter how hard we try to stop, moderate, or control our drinking or drug use, we can’t do it. And as a result, our lives are not turning out the way we want.

The reasonable conclusion from working Step One is, “If I can’t figure this out on my own, then I need help, and it’s going to have come from something much wiser than I am and much bigger and stronger than alcohol and drugs.”

Working Step Two does not necessarily mean we must embrace the capital “G” God as the power greater than ourselves. Although many people are comfortable with this concept of Higher Power, there are also those who aren’t. And that’s completely acceptable.

For recovery newcomers, it may be more effective to have a tangible power greater than themselves in the form of the 12-Step recovery process, the 12-Step Recovery community, and a caring, present sponsor.

The essence of Step Two is recognizing and coming to believe two key concepts: 1. I can’t seem to figure it out because my addiction is bigger than I am; and 2. For me to survive and turn my life around I need help, and the help I get is going to have to be more powerful than my addiction.

Step Two is critically important because it sets the stage for all the other steps. Until we finally come to believe we need help, we won’t ask for it. Until we ask for help, we won’t experience the sense of hope and promise offered by working the remaining Steps.


Recovery is Possible

Recover Life.

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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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