Tag Archives: Prescriptions

Tag Archives: Prescriptions


Alcohol & Drug Addiction – Adult Men’s Recovery Services

Cumberland Heights' Men's Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Men’s Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

When Cumberland Heights opened its doors in 1966, our Men’s Program was among the first of its kind providing men a new and rewarding life in recovery from addiction. Each program is gender specific and follows the fundamental teachings of the 12 Steps of recovery.

Through our 50+ years treating patients, we’ve found men often struggle the most with societal pressures that make it difficult for them to express their feelings or make them feel pressured to obtain a specific level of success.  The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.  In most cases,  the men’s program is up to 30 days in length and the primary program for men ages 18 and up. For those who require additional support, we also offer an Extended Care Program for men-only, up to 180 days in length, to assist those who desire a safe transitional program back into everyday life.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Men and Sober Living program for Women. These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

We tailor an individual plan for each patient, with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.

From a patient’s first assessment, through residential treatment, and all the way to their first aftercare group, newly recovering men are provided the necessary resources for a sober, productive and fulfilling life.  As part of the recovery community, men begin to break down the barriers addiction and stereotypes have built up.  As men learn intimately about the disease of addiction, they begin to normalize their feelings and experiences.

At Cumberland Heights, our goal is to help men turn the hard work of getting clean and sober into a lifetime of happiness and contentment.

Men’s First Step Program

The First Step Program is a combination of a residential stay for detoxification and stabilization as needed, followed by Intensive Outpatient treatment for three hours, four times/week to assist the patient in learning and establishing recovery skills. Length of stay in the residential and intensive outpatient components varies based upon clinical needs and outside support systems. The patient’s treatment team works to determine an individual recommendation for each patient. Family education groups are offered in both program components. Cumberland Heights contracts with a variety of insurance providers. Our staff can assist you and your family in estimating insurance benefits and out of pocket costs.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Men
The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.

Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for men who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps men identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

The Men’s Extended Care Community

The Men’s Extended Care Community is based on a 60 – 120 day residential stay. This program, which mirrors primary treatment in the Traditional Men’s Program or other similar program, helps you identify and address core psychological issues that may sabotage ongoing recovery. It also allows you to practice a daily recovery program in a supportive setting that’s less restrictive than primary care. Men come to the main campus every day for treatment activities and share transitional housing located one mile from the main campus. Active attendance and participation in the local 12-Step community creates a bridge between treatment and recovery community environments.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.








The Young Adult Program

We help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery while helping them process life's consequences and unmanageability.
We help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery.

In recent years, young adults, ages 18 – 25, have sought treatment for addiction in increasing numbers. Whereas patients well into adulthood often suffer from a damaged marriage or lost hope, younger patients experience what some refer to as a “failure to launch.” Most young adult addictions prevent them from reaching milestones such as college, careers or a healthy relationship.

Cumberland Heights’ Young Adult Program is a 12 Step based, gender specific recovery program for emerging adults ages 18 to 25 who are suffering from drug or alcohol addiction. The program is made up of an interdisciplinary clinical team of professionals specialized in working with addiction, emerging adults and collegiate recovery communities. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings and family therapy.

A focus on learning to manage emotions and interact effectively with peers in a caring, yet challenging community, is the core of helping this age group form a strong recovery identity.

Because many of our patients are currently seeking a secondary education we work closely with educational institutions to help patients resume their college careers, and lend the support necessary to stay sober in these challenging environments.

Most importantly, we help young men identify their strengths and set goals for recovery while helping them process life’s consequences and unmanageability.

Program Specifics

Our treatment model consists of a multi-faceted approach, understanding that connecting and relating to the male adolescent can be a challenge, but essential for positive outcomes.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

















Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.



NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A hard hit can do more than just knock the wind out of a player on the field. It can leave them with an injury requiring medical attention and possibly pain medication.
“Sports are probably the leading cause of injury in kids but I think it is important to understand that sports in general are protective,” Dr. Alex Diamond said. “We know kids who play sports compared to kids who don’t are typically less likely to be involved in risky behaviors.”

 
High school sports injuries can lead to addiction depending on treatmentDr. Diamond is an assistant professor of Orthopedics and Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is also the team physician for Vanderbilt University, Nashville Predators and the Nashville sounds. He along with the other physicians at in his department treated 26,000 adult and children athletes in 2016.
“As physicians we need to be mindful when treating children with injuries what situation require pain medication and what situations can be handled without pain medication,” he said. “Most of them can be handled without pain medications.”

 
Pain medications like hydrocodone, oxycodone and other opioids can be very effective in treating chronic pain. But, they can also be addictive and lead to more illicit drugs like heroin.

 
At Cumberland Heights, a non-profit addiction treatment facility, the number of teens entering the facility’s Adolescent and Young Men’s Services department has grown so much in the past couple of months it is expanding to keep up with the need.

 
“We take kids from all over the country,” Director of Adolescent and Young Men’s Services Dean Porterfield said. “The primary diagnosis is substance abuse, but It is not uncommon though that the underlying issues once you take those substances away are anxiety, depression or trauma.”

 
According to Porter for the 18 year old to 25 year old age group that makes up the Young Men’s program a growing number are addicted to heroin.

 
“A notable factor with the young adult population that we serve is that several of them are athletes who have experienced high school or college sports injuries that have required surgery and have become addicted to painkillers.”

 
He continued, “When the painkillers run out or they become more expensive the more accessible affordable drug is the heroin. That replaces what used to be that passion for sports and athletics and now their primary goal is to drug seek.”

 
Porterfield said with heroin it is not uncommon for the treatment center to get a call from family or the patient themselves saying they are in route for immediate admission to the facility.

 
“They are also some of the most vulnerable patients and need a great deal of attention throughout the painful detox and early days of treatment to prevent them from leaving against medical advice,” he said. “One of the things Cumberland Heights clinicians have made a priority is educating these young men on the risks of relapse and the lethal dangers associated with resuming the volume of heroin use they came in handling with the assumption their tolerance level is the same.”

 
He continued, “This scenario increases the likely hood of a lethal overdose.”

 
At Cumberland Heights the process is based on the 12-Steps.

 
After detox the work begins to help the young men understand the underlying reasons they abused drugs. In many cases its tied to the emotion effect their injury had on them and their identities.

 
“Just being an adolescent adult in general is full of ups and downs,” Porterfield said. “When they realize this substance can help alleviate that, they get hooked pretty quick.”
The same progression from painkillers to heroin and stronger opioids is much the same in adult users.

 
According to the CDC Tennessee is one of the most overprescribed states for painkillers.

 
At one point doctor’s wrote more prescriptions for painkillers than there were people in the state.

 
“As physicians we need to be mindful when treating children with injuries about which situations require pain medication and what situations can be handled without pain medication,” he said.

 
“We have a lot of other options that don’t have the same complications and risk involved with addiction.”

 
Dr. Diamond said things like physical therapy, proper braces or casts and anti-inflammatory medications can be very effective.

 
“As a parent you need to be diligent on what pain medication your kids are getting,” he said. “For the most part the narcotic pain medication is not needed for what we are seeing in our children. It is very rare.”

 
Porterfield said parents should be involved in their teens lives take note if you start to notice missing money, missing prescription medication, if your child is hanging out with friends or in places you do not know, and if your child attends unsupervised parties.

 


How Do I Know I’ve Hit Bottom?

How Do I Know I’ve Hit Bottom?
Hit Bottom: Those of us who experience increased physical tolerance for alcohol or drugs inevitably see an increase in our mental and emotional tolerance for pain, suffering and compromising our values.
You can’t predict when you will “Hit bottom.” For some the mere threat of failing out of school, losing our spouse, family support or a job is motivation enough to begin the process of recovery. For others the bottom is a much messier, deeper, darker place. Those of us who experience increased physical tolerance for alcohol or drugs inevitably see an increase in our mental and emotional tolerance for pain, suffering and compromising our values. This desensitization is an integral part of the denial system a person needs to sustain their drinking or drug use. It sounds like, “Sure, my wife left me, I got a DUI and I was fired, but I don’t see why everyone else is so upset.” Similarly, a comment I’ve heard among younger, opiate addicted patients who relapse within a matter of weeks is, “Sure, I’ve overdosed a few times. I’ve had some friends die from overdose, but I don’t really need to do all this recovery stuff. I just need to quit using.”

Exactly what does it take to cause surrender? The unfortunate reality is past, present or future consequences, no matter how dire, are often not enough to cause a person to hit bottom and choose the path of recovery. That’s because hitting bottom, reaching the point when enough is enough, is an extremely personal thing. Some people in recovery describe having a moment when the pain and fear of staying in active addiction was greater than the pain and fear they felt about the recovery process. But the best definition I’ve heard recently was from a patient who defined hitting bottom by saying, “It’s when bad things are happening to me faster than I can lower my standards.”


Stan Bumgarner graduated from Vanderbilt Divinity School in 2006 and worked for the Tennessee Association of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services teaching ministers across the state. This led him to become an alcohol and drug counselor. He is currently the Spiritual Director at Cumberland. Stan is a regular speaker at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Clarksville, the father of thirteen-year-old twins and active in his own 12-Step recovery.

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