Tag Archives: Recovery

Tag Archives: Recovery


Join us for our inaugural Breakfast of Champions benefiting ARCH Academy featuring Bill Battle

Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle

Event Details:

WHO: Bill Battle
WHAT: Breakfast of Champions
WHEN: Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 7:30am
WHERE: Richland Country Club; 1 Club Dr, Nashville, TN 37215

Event Tickets, Sponsorship Packages & Donation Opportunities:

Event Description:

Athletic Director Bill Battle Photo by Kent Gidley 04-03-13 Administration Mugs Athletic Director Bill Battle
Bill Battle, Athletic Director, Coach

After a successful four-year tenure as Director of Athletics at The University of Alabama, Bill Battle transitioned into his current role as Special Assistant to the President in 2017. While leading Alabama athletics, they produced three NCAA team national championships, 11 SEC team championships in five different sports, 17 NCAA individual/relay titles; 40 Academic All-Americans; and 21 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship awardees.

Battle has had an impactful role in a career that spans more than 50 years and has encompassed some of the most historically compelling issues in collegiate athletics. From his days as a football player under head coach Paul W. “Bear” Bryant, on to assistant coaching stints at Oklahoma, Army and Tennessee, and becoming the nation’s youngest head football coach at UT.

At Tennessee, Battle played a key role in the rise of the African-American student-athlete in the South as he oversaw the development of UT’s first black quarterback. After his coaching days came to an end, he excelled in the business world by bringing the licensing of logos, slogans and other intellectual property to universities. That development brought about a major new revenue stream, enriching institutions across America.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

Join us for this informative panel on the music industry and its response to mental health and substance abuse.

Panelists Include:

Paul Williams: President and Chairman of ASCAP, American Composer, Actor

Ken Levitan: Founder and Co-President Vector Management

Judy Crane: Author, Co-Founder & CEO The GuestHouse Ocala, Spirit2Spirit Healing

The Warren Brothers: American Songwriting Duo

*Limited Attendance, reservation required*

*Parking is limited, guests are highly encouraged to utilize nearby pay-parking lots, street parking, or ride sharing services*

REGISTER HERE

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Life actually has meaning to me now

Alex H Podcast – Life actually has meaning to me now.

Spending his early 20s in the restaurant industry meant late nights, free booze and social night caps. But as Alex explains, things got out of hand quickly and he found himself at Cumberland Heights. Fortunately, now in recovery, he’s able to use his talents as a chef to serve others fighting similar demons.

An Evening with Travis Meadows: A Benefit for Cumberland HeightsTravis Meadows spent years trying to escape himself. He’s anything but selfish, so he’d find a way to get away––a bottle, a bag, a sermon––and he’d share it with everyone. That was then. Now, Meadows isn’t trying to get anybody lost or high. Instead, he’s trying to get every single one of us to settle in deeply to ourselves––and love what’s there.

“I feel like what I’m doing is giving people permission to be okay with who they are, where they’re at now,” Meadows says. “A lot of us say stuff like, ‘If I’d been married to this guy or this girl, or if I had enough money, or if I had a better job. If I wasn’t an alcoholic, or if I drank more. If this, if that, then, I think I could be a better person.’” He pauses. “I think the key to life is being okay with who you are.”

Meadows isn’t just waxing poetic about the perks of self-acceptance. The 52-year-old has clawed his way to the peace he’s found, and his willingness to map that journey through his songs has saved more lives than his own. On his anxiously awaited new album First Cigarette, Meadows proves once again that when he sings the truth he’s living, he can set us all free. “I’ve always put secrets in my records, but I had this ring of fire that nobody could get in––a defense mechanism from my childhood. Nobody gets too close,” he says. “I think this record is a way of me letting people in a little more, inside the ring of fire.”

Disciples have been dancing by Meadows’ fire for years. Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, Jake Owen, Mary Gauthier, Brandy Clark, Blackberry Smoke, Hank Williams, Jr., Wynonna Judd, Randy Houser, and others began writing with, recording, and praising Meadows as soon as they heard his work. Songs such as “Riser,” the title track for Bentley’s 2015 album; Church’s “Knives of New Orleans” and “Dark Side”; and Owen’s “What We Ain’t Got” are all Meadows-penned chart-climbers.

Much of the attention began in 2010, when Meadows self-released Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, a raw masterpiece that left listeners stunned. “I was in rehab, and one of my counselors suggested that I keep a journal, so I basically made a record out of that journal,” Meadows says. It became an unlikely phenomenon, handed from friend to friend and artist to artist with whispers of, Listen. It’s the best thing you’ll hear all year. In 2013, Meadows followed Killin’ Uncle Buzzy with the acclaimed Old Ghosts and Unfinished Business. “On Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, you’re listening to a guy trying to figure out how to get sober,” Meadows says. “Then two years later, I was sober, but I wasn’t that guy anymore. That’s what ‘Old Ghosts’ was––me just trying to move forward. I feel like this record is more accessible. People can listen and go, ‘Well, hell. I’ve done that, too.’”

An intimate record utilizing just Meadow’s blues-hewn voice and mostly acoustic guitar with pops of electric and other strings, First Cigarette is an intensely relatable meditation on love, acceptance, and redemption––an artistic and personal triumph, especially for a man whose early life was defined by loss and pain. At the age of two, Meadows watched his baby brother drown. When his parents divorced, he wound up living with his grandparents rather than either of his parents. “My dad went and got married and had a baby, and they were almost a normal family,” Meadows says. “And my mother also went and almost had a normal family, whatever that is.” His thick Mississippi accent makes the ‘r’ at the end of father and mother soft in his mouth. “I was over there with my grandparents like, ‘Well what the hell happened to me? Why am I not good enough to be part of that family?’ I carried that resentment for a long time.”

Adversity would remain a constant in Meadows’ youth. At the age of eleven, he began using drugs. At fourteen, he was diagnosed with cancer. He would go on to beat the disease, but not before it cost him his right leg from just below the knee. Meadows picked himself up and began playing drums––“They’d sneak me in the back door and I would play for people in bars”––but tired of lugging all that gear and picked up the harmonica. “I could put all my instruments in a Crown Royal bag, and I would sing and play the blues,” he says. Then, in his 20s, Meadows underwent another conversion: he became a Christian. He preached across the South and in 20-something countries for 17 years. “Preachers fall hard,” he says. “I had some questions I didn’t like the answers to. So I quit and went back to my old friend alcohol.”

First Cigarette benefits from all of the battles Meadows has lost and won, including his now seven years––and counting––of sobriety. Album opener “Sideways” is a gut punch. A blend of confession and advice, the song explores what happens when emotion is stifled. Meadows wrote “Sideways” after performing and speaking at an adolescent addiction treatment center. He asked the kids there, all younger than 18, if anyone wanted to share their story. A girl raised her hand, spoke, and broke Meadows’ heart. “She floored me,” he says. “I said, ‘Well, I’d want to get high too. How did that make you feel?’ One tear came down her cheek. She rubbed it away and said, ‘I don’t feel nothin’.’ One of the counselors and I were talking later. If the only tool you have is a hammer, you’re going to treat everything in your life like a nail.”

“Pray for Jungleland” channels Bruce Springsteen as it celebrates him, nostalgic for love at eighteen and a world that revolves around Friday night. Written with Drew Kennedy, the song is the first of several on the album that capture youth with misty-eyed levity––a departure from Uncle Buzzy that Meadows is clearly enjoying. “McDowell Road” serves as a thematic bookend for “Jungleland,” while the slow-building “Pontiac” offers anchoring advice and warm memories as hopes for young hearts.

A standout on an album stacked with gems, “First Cigarette” features searing vocals that shift back and forth between defiant muscle and naked delicacy. “I am little more content, I am little more content with who I am than who I was,” Meadows sings. “I have learned to love the comfort when it comes, like the first cigarette the morning buzz.” Written with Connie Harrington, “Hungry” showcases Meadows’ unique ability to haunt and soothe at the same time. “Hunger is the thing that motivates us to get up and try again,” he says. “I pray that I never lose that hunger.” The gorgeous “Better Boat” takes another moving look at Meadows’ hard-won contentment.

“Life can be a little challenging for all of us. It’s beautiful and it’s tragic, it’s awesome and it hurts,” Meadows says. “I hope people sense that through this record and want to come to a show, which is a lot of storytelling, a lot of tears, a lot of laughter. They’ll come face to face with a damn lot of humanity. I hope they see themselves in it.”

This Show is Sold Out!

Sunday Sermon: The Rich Young Man

September 8, 2019

What is our most prized possession? What do we want to hold on to at all cost? Our belief system! In this talk Stan explores the Biblical story of the Rich Young Man as a way to understand why we must be willing to change the way we think and act if we are to recover from our addiction.

Legal and Ethical Game Show Event

Legal & Ethical Game Show EventSay good-bye to dull legal and ethical trainings! This style of presentation grew out of recognition that most mental health professionals do not need another lecture on typical legal and ethical topics. What has been needed is a fun, stimulating way to review and learn from what they already know. Participants are broken into teams and each team has an electronic remote that sends the team’s answer to questions to a computer that keeps scores. Answers from teams are scored, graphed, posted, and discussed. Sponsors can provide prizes to the winning team. In one format, questions are presented on a Jeopardy-style screen where categories are chosen and questions get harder as point values increase. The full-day training includes a Family Feud component. This presentation can accommodate any size audience. For large audiences, a gallery is created in the back of the room and play along as desired. The questions posed have been years in development and often focus on lesser-known aspects of legal and ethical quandaries.

Evaluations for this training have been exceptionally positive. Audience members have had a wonderful time discussing and working through perplexing questions. I have never seen a training format that stimulated so much discussion and where time flew by so fast. All legal and ethical questions are designed for all mental health settings and guilds including counseling, social work, psychology, marriage and family, psychiatry, drug and alcohol, case management, etc. For substance abuse counselors a special section can be included covering 42 CFR. This program is available in a 3 or 6-hour format. For large audiences morning and afternoon sessions could be advertised and attendees could choose the most convenient session to attend. For more information please visit:

Credit: 3 Hours

REGISTER HERE

Learn the benefits of having a 12-step sponsor during your time in recovery

12-Step programs have long been known for their success in providing people with a supportive environment and the structure they need to regain strength in sobriety. The reality is that amidst the throes of addiction, we simply can’t do it alone – we need the help of a Higher Power to guide us and help us feel safe while navigating the ups and downs of being human. If you’ve recently begun treatment for addiction, or perhaps you’re considering it, also consider participating in a 12-Step program – and while you’re at it, reap the benefits of maintaining contact with a 12-Step sponsor, too.

What is a 12-Step Sponsor?

A.A. (also known as Alcoholics Anonymous) explains that 12-Step sponsors are meant to provide additional support for those who are on the road to recovery; many people in addiction recovery feel alone and question their capabilities to push forward, but 12-Step sponsors do their best to be sympathetic and understanding for whatever life’s challenges may bring. In fact, a 2015 study published in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism gathered the experiences of 302 young adults who reported having a 12-Step sponsor at the time of the study. They were assessed at the beginning of the study, and at 3, 6 and 12 months later as well.

Researchers from the study found that the therapeutic alliance between the 12-Step sponsor and individual did have a positive effect on treatment engagement and overall recovery outcomes. This truly supports what other areas of research have shown us thus far – which is that social support does truly impact an individual’s view of themselves, others and their recovery as a whole.

A few years ago, one individual shared their personal experience of having an A.A. sponsor via Pacific Standard, an online publication that posts stories related to news, economics, education, environment, social justice and more. They stated:

“…I believe that these programs can be a wonderful resource for those who find them amenable…Because they’re free, available 24/7 and provide support for abstinence that is otherwise unavailable, they may play a role in some people’s recovery that is not easily filled by anything else.”

What’s important to note is that with 12-Step sponsors, there are many things they are not: such as the fact that they’re not therapists, they’re not social workers and they’re not getting paid for any of the work they complete. These roles are on a volunteer basis, and with that comes a real human being who has gone through similar (or different) experiences than another person’s.

The Benefits of 12-Step Sponsorship

If a relationship is formed and two people work together to create a seamless system, 12-Step sponsorship can be incredibly beneficial. For example, a study published in the journal “Psychology of Addictive Behavior” explored this very topic – and found that having an A.A. sponsor predicted increased alcohol abstinence and abstinence from marijuana and cocaine; the study also found that 12-Step sponsorship aided in greater participation in treatment and motivation for recovery. Why is this? Perhaps it’s the fact that a 12-Step sponsor provides individuals with someone who can believe in them – as well as someone who can hold them accountable.

Several years ago, an individual named Victor shared his story of addiction recovery via the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley. He stated that after being court-ordered to attend A.A. meetings, he’s become more intertwined with the 12-Step program and has thus found many benefits of 12-Step sponsorship:

“It keeps me accountable and plugged in. It gives me a sense of purpose.”

For those who may be apprehensive to have a 12-Step sponsor, remember a few things:

  • Each sponsor relationship is going to be different, because each person is different
  • The relationship developed between sponsor and sponsee all depends on how the pair choose to engage in the sponsorship
  • Expectations need to be laid out ahead of time, so that neither person is disappointed
  • The spirit of 12-Step sponsorship is to have an additional person for support

It was once stated that,

“Experience is not what happens to you, it is what you do with what happens to you.”

The idea is to remember that your 12-Step sponsor is meant to help guide you in the best way that they can – and it’s ultimately up to you to push forward and remain diligent in recovery.

Seek Help Today

12-Step programs can be a wonderful addition to formalized treatment because they only serve to reinforce sobriety – and they can also help people develop a stronger connection to a Higher Power through a structured program based on spirituality. If you’re ready to take better control over your life, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.


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