Tag Archives: Sober Living

Tag Archives: Sober Living


Sober livingIn 2015, yoga teacher and addiction recovery writer Tommy Rosen wrote an article for the Huffington Post on what a life of sobriety means to him. This is an excerpt from his article:

“My recovery mantra is: ‘Don’t just survive in addiction. Thrive in recovery.’ I believe people in recovery must work toward the great shift from staying sober out of fear and necessity to staying sober out of love for the life they get to live as the result of staying sober.”

Sobriety is an all-too-often feared subject of those starting out in recovery, as the concept itself seems so different from what they’re used to. The truth is, a lifestyle of sobriety is different from one of active addiction – but it’s for a good reason. The benefits of sobriety are insurmountable compared to anything else; they not only give you your life back, but they give you the tools, support and resources you need to enrich your life more than you ever thought possible.

A 2017 study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment found that even one year of sobriety can make a world of difference; participants who remained sober for one year already showed improvements in life satisfaction, executive functioning and improvements in psychological distress compared to those not living a lifestyle of sobriety. Of course, there are many other powerful transformations that result from sober living, such as:

  • The reversal of some of those aging effects that addiction can cause (not only will you feel better, you’ll look better, too!)
  • The ability to connect with people and form meaningful relationships that are deeper than you ever had before
  • Feelings of empowerment as you’re able to control your mindset rather than letting your thoughts and emotions get the best of you
  • A life that is centered on what really matters – family, friends, passion, hobbies, career, adventure, love, values, spirituality and so much more

Sober living is an entire mind, body and spirit transformation. We shift from living a self-indulgent, unhealthy lifestyle, to one filled with balance, strength and hope.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Teen boy home from rehabParenting in and of itself can become really challenging during your child’s teenage years, but when our teens come back from rehabilitation, it can feel as though we’re stepping into an entirely new world. We may begin to question whether we’re saying or doing the right things that are beneficial for their recovery; we may become paranoid, worried that we’re going to miss signs of substance abuse and we may not know whether to trust our teens again or to watch their every move. It’s certainly a major change when teens come home from rehabilitation, because they’ve just spent between 1 and 6 months surrounded by structure, sobriety leaders and more. If your teen is about to come home, don’t be worried – there are steps you can take to make this as smooth of a transition as possible.

It’s All About Perception

First and foremost, you need to take a quick inventory of how you’re feeling about everything right now. Have you come to terms with the fact that your teen is recovering from addiction? How do you view relapse? Relapse is a normal part of recovery and, while we should try to reduce the risks of it as much as possible, you don’t want to view your teen’s success in recovery based on whether or not they relapse. In fact, you’ll want to view their recovery as an ongoing process with ups and downs. The sooner you can adopt this perspective, the better.

Secondly, how important do you make your child’s recovery? If you don’t place it as a high priority, your teen will be able to sense that – and it will make it more difficult for them to remain sober without your full support. Greg Williams, 26 years old, shared his story of struggling with marijuana and prescription drug addiction when he was 17 years old. Several years ago, he told Family Circle, a website that covers topics such as teens, health, family, holidays and more, about his experience with addiction recovery and support. He stated,

“…My parents – they did not cause nor could they cure my addiction. However, my success in overcoming it is very much because of them and the support they provided me. They continue to help me make healthy choices, and I owe everything in my life to them.”

Place Your Expectations to the Side

Many parents become ready to emphasize house rules when their teen comes home, but you may want to recognize that recovery maintenance is what’s most important right now. Respect your teen’s return home by encouraging them to practice gratitude, kindness and more – just like you would with a guest staying at your house. This type of encouragement will help ease your teen back at home without overwhelming them. Residential treatment requires a lot of work from teens, and it’s likely that your child may be feeling stressed and/or exhausted. As DrugFree.org notes, encourage your teen to return to work/school at a slower pace if it’s needed; promote healthy activities, such as adequate exercise, healthy food, water and good sleep.

Be Prepared, and Be Resilient

A 2015 study published in the journal Behavioral Science highlighted the many phases that families go through when their teen struggles with addiction: 1) confirming suspicions, 2) struggling to set limits, 3) dealing with consequences of drug use, 4) living with blame and shame, 5) keeping their child safe, 6) giving loss to the child they knew before, 7) living with guilt and 8) choosing self-preservation. Addiction causes a lot of heartache, but you have to remember who and what you’re here for.

Remind yourself of what addiction is capable of and note that your teen may still experience triggers and cravings to use substances. Teens can experience relapse just as quickly as they may recover, but it’s important to remember that they’re all steps taken in their journey to recovery. Discuss consequences with your teen, and make sure they are specific and clear. If your teen nears 18 years of age, be sure to seek additional help beforehand if possible; it can be harder to convince your teen to go back into treatment once they’ve considered themselves an “adult” by legal standards. Mutual boundaries are often a great way to ensure that both you and your teen know what’s expected of them – and if rules are broken, everyone is in agreeance on what will occur.

Don’t Give Up

Whether your teen likes to vocalize it or not, they need your support. They need your unconditional love and patience. They need you to stand up for them, to fight for them, to be a voice of reason. No matter how you’re feeling about what’s going on with your teen, there is rarely a logical reason to give up on them.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Woman recovering from addictionNo matter who is embarking on the journey through addiction recovery, the same principle applies: each person’s story – and journey – is different. On the surface, there are so many differences we could describe that would make sense for why these differences exist. Our genetic makeup, personality, medical history, health, upbringing, social environment and so much more affect our lived experiences, which ultimately impacts our recovery. As you continue learning more about how addiction affects the mind, body and spirit, you’ll learn that drugs can affect people differently – which means their recovery time is unique to them, too.

There is truly no “one-size-fits-all” when it comes to treatment. The core basics of mind, body and spirit are there (because they make up our experience as humans), but there are variations within and between these aspects and they matter. A 2018 study published in The Canadian Journal of Addiction emphasized the notion of “risk” factors for addiction, which can certainly influence a person’s recovery (and relapse vulnerability, too). Being aware of these factors can help you ensure that you’re taking appropriate steps towards meeting your recovery goals, along with what to avoid:

Risk Factors

  • Long delays in seeking treatment
  • Not having stable housing
  • Having a lack of supportive networks
  • Insufficient amount of resources
  • And more

How can we combat some of these risk factors? A lot of this effort comes into play when we build ourselves up and become advocates for our own recovery. When we do this, we utilize “protective factors”, we are:

Protective Factors

  • Having faith-based resources
  • Parental involvement
  • Supportive friends and family members
  • Stable home environment
  • And more

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) notes that both “protective” and “risk” factors can exist in multiple contexts. Certain situations can bring about both risk factors and protective factors, but that’s what recovery is all about: learning how to navigate them day by day, one step at a time.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

Living sober after recoveryFormal treatment is an excellent place to start learning the ins and outs of recovery, but it shouldn’t stop there. Even after you’ve completed your treatment program, you want to make sure you’re continuing to use the tools you’ve learned. Sobriety can truly open your eyes to the beauty that is life, but it takes time to feel grounded once you’ve left treatment. You have the ability to create the ultimate sober living environment, you just need to remember the following:

  • Stock Up on Support. Continue to surround yourself with people who truly support your recovery. Distance yourself from those who trigger you or who don’t respect your decision to remain sober.
  • Go to Bed. A 2014 study published in the journal Family & Community Health assessed 164 people in addiction recovery and found a high prevalence of sleep disturbance. Sleep significantly affects quality of life, making adequate sleep a necessary part of sobriety.
  • Eat Healthy Foods. Addiction depletes us of vital nutrients and minerals, which can only dehydrate us and make it more difficult for us to think clearly. U.S News suggests eating leafy green vegetables, poultry, vitamin D, protein from fish and more.
  • Establish Structure. Just as with formal treatment, structure is incredibly important for those in recovery. Having a set plan for the day leaves little room for rumination or spending time with people who are not conducive to your recovery.
  • Continue to Build Spirituality. 12-Step programs are an excellent way to continue to build your relationship with God or another Higher Power. Previous studies have shown that those with strengthened spirituality often experience higher quality of life and lower relapse rates compared to those who don’t.

Sobriety gives you the option to better connect with loved ones, create new memories and grow as a person. If you’re ready to start your journey to recovery today, speak with someone from Cumberland Heights.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

Using outpatient treatment programs to help addiction recoveryRecovery is a lifelong journey and many people find that structured recovery programs do not end once their residential treatment program is over. In order to continue building upon what they’ve learned before, one must continue to submerge themselves in the world of recovery. Intensive outpatient treatment programs are an excellent way for those in recovery to ensure they don’t fade away from their recovery goals – by working closely with a healthcare team and continuing to attend individual and group therapy, recovery is much less daunting and more routinized.

Relapse is a central focus of addiction recovery, as preventative measures are necessary in order for a person to continue walking on the path of recovery. How can an intensive outpatient treatment program assist with this?

A 2015 study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence sought to explore how outpatient treatment programs supported relapse prevention amongst emerging adults (aged 18-25 years old) in the first year after their residential treatment. A total of 284 individuals participated in the study and this is what researchers found:

  • Continuing care was significantly shown to impact abstinence over time
  • The odds of abstinence were 1.3 times greater if individuals participated in at least one recovery activity, but were 3.2 times greater if they participated in 5 activities
  • 12-Step programs provided much-needed support in terms of relapse prevention and activity involvement

Social support is an incredibly influential factor of relapse in addiction recovery and outpatient treatment programs paired with 12-Step programs provide everything a person needs to feel grounded. Separate from residential treatment, individuals can start building their independence by returning home at the end of each day and working towards securing their family and workplace roles they may have previously held.

If you’re ready to begin your journey to recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. It is never too late.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 615-356-2700.

Family education group in addiction recoveryThose who struggled with addiction aren’t the only ones impacted, as friends and family must heal from the pain that addiction brings, too. Addiction has the propensity to pull our loved ones away from us, sometimes to a point of barely recognizing those we love. Healing is vital to recovery for friends and family and part of this involves education. Knowledge is power and the more we learn about addiction and how it’s affecting our loved ones, the better we’re able to make sense of our experiences.

A 2016 study published in the Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery emphasized that family functioning can change greatly when addiction is involved, as some family members may need to take on new roles that an addicted loved one can no longer fulfill. The strain of these changes and the emotions that come with this type of event can create a sense of unbalance for families and family education groups strive to promote togetherness by informing individuals of the many facets of addiction and recovery:

  • What addiction is and how it affects the mind, body and spirit
  • Coping skills
  • Establishing healthy boundaries
  • Warnings and signs of enabling addiction
  • 12-Step program information and involvement
  • And more

As Harvard Medical School noted in 2017, individual family members often suffer alone, making it vital for them to seek help individually as well. The effects of addiction impact people differently and in order for a family to better function as a whole, individual family members must work on recovery alone, too.

If you’re ready to begin your journey to recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. The time to rejuvenate your mind, body and spirit is now.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

How impulsivity impacts addiction recoveryImpulsivity has long been part of the discussion when it comes to addiction recovery, as individuals who have difficulty holding back from acting on something – despite their negative consequences – have been shown to be more susceptible to addiction. As an article published by researchers from California suggests, addiction affects the prefrontal cortex, which influences the way a person makes decisions, speaks, learns, judges and more. The prefrontal cortex is a part of the brain that we use to make rational decisions, but where impulsivity takes place, addiction causes a person to transition from impulsivity to compulsivity. When this happens, a person is no longer using substances for pleasure – rather, they are seeking out substances because their mind and body feel compelled to do so; as the researchers from the study aforementioned suggest, this is essentially like having a car without brakes.

Impulsivity: How It Works

A 2014 article published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) explained that impulsivity is a form of altered regulation in the brain and those who are more prone to impulsive behaviors are prone to choosing immediate rewards over more effortful, long-term incentives. Furthermore, a 2017 study published in the journal Psychopharmacology sought to explore the types of impulsivity and how they are linked to addictive behaviors. A total of 1,252 young adults were assessed on different impulsive and personality trait measures and these were the three “types” of impulsivity the researchers found:

  • Impulsive Choice – choosing immediate rewards over longer-term ones
  • Impulsive Action – difficulty withholding a response to act impulsively
  • Impulsive Personality Traits – personality traits that often correlate to acting without thinking

Previous studies have shown that impulsivity, attention and working memory deficits are often found in those with substance use disorders (SUDs). While we can understand the relationship between impulsivity and how addiction translates this into compulsiveness for those abusing substances, a different question remains: Do those in addiction recovery still experience issues with impulsiveness? If so, what is their experience like?

Combatting Impulsivity in Addiction Recovery

A study conducted by researchers from Portland, Oregon in 2017 sought to understand these types of impairments in adults recovering from methamphetamine addiction. Twenty-four people in recovery were compared with thirty people not addicted to any substances. The researchers conducted several tests to identify any key differences between the groups, especially as it relates to executive functioning and impulsivity. They found that those recovering from meth addiction experienced much more difficulty with attention and working memory, planning and organization and mental flexibility compared to the group of individuals not struggling with addiction.

There’s no doubt that the effects of addiction can weigh heavily on one’s recovery – for many, it’s a process of learning and re-learning.

Cynthia Moreno Tuohy, Executive Director of the Association for Addiction Professionals (NAADAC). explained in 2014 that part of breaking down this impulsive nature is to try different approaches – and often, over time – so the brain learns to ask questions, problem solve, weigh out decisions and more, which are tools towards combating relapse and living more mindfully.

This type of “brain training” is heavily reinforced in intensive outpatient treatment programs, where individuals can begin to practice what they’ve been learning in treatment to their home, school and work lives. Of course, impulsiveness can still rear its head, even for someone who has been working diligently towards their recovery for quite some time. In some moments of vulnerability, we may find that we’re more susceptible to acting on our emotions – and that is when we really need to remind ourselves of the rules for recovery.

The 5 Rules of Recovery

A 2015 article published in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine emphasized that when it comes to relapse prevention, it’s a gradual process. Different stages take place and along with that come various personal milestones. The main tools of recovery often involve cognitive therapy, which helps to change negative thinking and impulsive behaviors that stem from it. There were 5 simple rules listed for recovery, which really provides an excellent and easy-to-understand foundation for those working to overcome impulses:

  1. Change your life – create a life where it’s easier to not use; this is often in terms of your routine, who you spend your time with and the hobbies you partake in
  2. Be completely honest – both with yourself and others, take responsibility when it’s due
  3. Ask for help – speak to your sponsor, reach out to your peers in your program and refer to the resources you’ve been given in recovery thus far to help guide you through challenging times
  4. Practice self-care – eat healthily, get exercise, sleep well, drink water and take good care of your health overall. Recovery is not just about sobriety, it’s about nourishing your mind, body and spirit
  5. Don’t bend the rules!

If you’re ready to begin your journey to recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. It is never too late.

Cumberland Heights in Nashville, Tennessee on Music Row is a 12-Step based alcohol & drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. We offer personalized assessments and treatment plans, as well as convenient evening hours to accommodate your workday schedule. To get started on your recovery journey today, call us at 615-356-2700.

remaining vigilant during recoveryIn 2017, psychotherapist Anita Gadhia-Smith told U.S. News,

“Remember that time [in sobriety] doesn’t exempt you from relapse. Anyone can relapse at any point in time.”

Women face unique challenges in addiction recovery and relapse prevention is an area of recovery that begs for vigilance, which is defined as, “the action or state of keeping careful watch for possible danger or difficulties.” There are many strategies that can be used to aid relapse prevention, but women in particular may view their recovery – and their self-identity through it – differently than men do. In 2017, researchers published a study in the journal Qualitative Social Work to explore women’s lived experiences in recovery and to find what helps them maintain vigilance. This is what they found:

  • Remembering. Many participants in the study reported remembering certain aspects of their substance abuse – and very vividly – so they could easily recall just how much destruction is caused and how “out of control” they felt. This served as a clear reminder to many women what happens when they engage in addiction.
  • Being careful. It was very important to women in the study to watch out for thoughts, feelings and behaviors that were signs of being triggered. They described a delicate balance between attention and monitoring as a way of anticipating or working through troubling events.
  • Seeking community. Community provided many women with a sense of safety, comfort and access to others whom they could build connections with. 12-Step programs were highlighted as places to stay “plugged in” to recovery.

Each person will experience different types of triggers, but the key is to find what works best for you. For many, the strategies listed above work wonderfully and others may have additional tools. Don’t wait any longer to start working diligently towards your journey.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

benefits of sober livingIf you’re looking for a supportive community that helps you transition from a more formalized treatment program to a more home-like setting, a sober living home could be an excellent step for you to take. Sober living houses provide a like-minded community of people who are after the same goal as you are – to remain sober. It can be a bit scary trying to figure out whether or not a sober living home is the right place for you. Each place can be different and, similar to any other neighborhood or community, a lot of the environment will depend on the people who live there. However, it’s pretty safe to say that you’ll be surrounded by people who also want to stay on the track of recovery – and you’ll still have your healthcare team, too.

The Benefits to Sober Living Homes

To talk about the many benefits of sober living homes, it’s probably best to talk about the factors that can hold a person back from their recovery. For example, having an unstable living situation can make it that much easier for a person to dive back into old habits and if friends or family members who abuse substances live at home or nearby, the chances of relapse may increase. Research has shown us time and time again just how important social support is to recovery and if you have major influencers in your life who don’t believe you can make it or who don’t want to do what they can to promote your recovery journey, it’s a risk that could place you back on the path of active addiction.

Recovery requires that we have consistency in a number of things, such as:

  • A set routine
  • A set bed time/ wake time
  • People you can rely on daily
  • Healthy food/exercise
  • Self-care activities such as reading, crafting, spending time with a pet, etc.
  • Helping others
  • And more

Sober living homes provide a community that’s already pre-determined with rules and curfews (and, of course, no alcohol or drug use), while also allowing more flexibility to ease back into independent-style living. Group meetings are still required and there are often a number of resources that are provided to help you meet your goals. These things might include help with making amends with friends or family members you may have hurt when substance abuse was active, it may mean assistance with finding a job, locating the right form of housing for you once your sober living house arrangement is complete and even general tips to adjusting to a fully independent but recovery-based lifestyle.

Stays at sober living homes are typically at least 90 days, but they can extend way past that. Many times, residents can stay for up to a year as long as they agree to abide by the house rules – which may include participating in house chores, paying rent and other living fees, staying abstinent, continued participation in 12-Step meetings and more. In a study published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, the average length of stay amongst 300 participants in sober living was 254 days, with another sober living home totaling 166 days.

If you decide to move forward with a sober living home, it’s probably a good idea to gear up on some tips for making the most of your experience.

How Can You Meet Your Recovery Goals in a Sober Living Home?

There are many programs available for people in terms of in-patient, outpatient, detox programs and more, but sober living homes are more about the environment and way of life. Several years ago, researchers from California assessed over 300 individuals entering sober living homes for 18 months; they found that a number of factors really helped these people improve on their journey to recovery:

  • Involvement in 12-Step programs
  • The type of social support network they had
  • Having lower psychiatric concerns

Support is a major component of sober living. In a 2015 study published in the journal Substance Abuse Rehabilitation, participants shared their experiences of living in a sober living home. One person shared just how helpful it was to have a wonderful sense of community with people who could help one another out if it was needed. They stated, “One of the things that I think is completely awesome is when somebody is having a bad day around here and you can kind of see…you kind of feel it, the aura…There [are] people that step up that ask you, hey, what’s going on?”

It’s hard to get that kind of support outside of the recovery world. For many people, it’s hard to get that kind of support at home, too. Living around others who have been there, who understand the painful thoughts or feelings you’re going through, can give you just the strength you needed for that day.

A New Opportunity

Sober living homes provide an experience like you’ve never had before. It’s another phase of your journey, another chance to learn something new about yourself, about others and about life overall. If you decide to move forward, you’ll find that the support you receive is exactly what was needed to make you feel more confident in your transition to independent living.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

What Are Some of the Most Beautiful Lessons of Sober Living?

Sobriety brings about an entirely new perspective of oneself, others and life as a whole. There’s nothing like being able to completely live in the moment, without the influence of drugs or alcohol. Sober living is a lifelong journey that requires a lot of hard work and dedication, but it’s absolutely worth it in the long run. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shares many success stories of individuals in recovery, and one person shared their experience with addiction. Here is an excerpt from their story, a lesson they learned: “[I have been] clean for the past 21 years from all mood-altering chemicals…I have come full circle from being addicted, whose life was unmanageable to one fully involved in the helping professions of mental health services. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve.”

One of the most beautiful lessons of sobriety is learning that you’re still strong, you’re still capable and your story is powerful to help others. Many people who have worked so hard in recovery also spend time volunteering because of this very lesson – they know that after everything they’ve been through, it’s worth it to try and help others better themselves, too.

Being sober means gaining a new perspective on what life means to you. Sobriety gives you lessons about quality time with those you love, communicating your wants and needs, remembering some of the best moments of your life, fully engaging in the present moment, and being able to influence others in the most positive of ways. According to The Medium, one person expressed that they didn’t realize being sober would mean they’d “feel everything” – as it turns out, substances block us from working through our emotions and make us quite numb instead. Rather than waiting for the time to pass by, or feeling like things are a blur, all of your thoughts and senses come to life – giving you a much more real, human experience.

Yes, there are days that are painful. There will always be ups and downs. Alcohol and other drugs do not benefit anyone, though – they merely serve as a distraction. With sobriety, you’re opening yourself up to become stronger, wiser and more whole than you’ve ever felt before. You’re ready to learn just how wonderful life can be when you’re fully present for it all times, taking in the good and the bad.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.


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