Tag Archives: substance use

Tag Archives: substance use


The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

Bad habits can lead to addiction

It all starts with casual use; we’re out with coworkers one day, having a few drinks – or we’re spending time with friends and drugs become introduced. In most cases, addiction starts when a person begins using substances for recreation – but over time, recreational use intensifies until a full-blown addiction has developed. It’s hard to fathom how this process works, especially when it can happen so quickly. The human mind and body are incredibly vulnerable to drugs, however – and without warning, we can become dependent on substances whether we originally meant to or not.

The Association for Psychological Science (APS) explains that drug-seeking begins as a goal-directed behavior with an action (such as finding substances and taking them). Through this process, a “high” is developed – and that involves the euphoric feeling that is pursued from the beginning. The stimulation from drugs feels positive, and over time, subtle “cues” can reinforce the good feeling that comes from using, such as:

  • The environment of being surrounded by people who are also using and having a good time
  • The smell of burning aluminum foil used for drugs
  • The sight of powdery, white ingredients
  • And more

In 2016, Medical Daily identified the pattern of using substances and receiving positive reinforcements as well as desires to increase use as a “habit loop”; essentially, it takes 66 days for a person to develop a habit (whether that be with exercise, food, substance abuse or something else), and drugs can fast-track this process depending on the amount consumed, the type of drug, how often the drug is used and other related factors.

Habits tend to transition into addiction without a person even realizing it. It can be a slow, gradual development or a quick one – but nonetheless, if steps aren’t taken to intervene, the pattern will only continue.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Boy teenager experiencing depression from marijuana useCannabis (also known as marijuana) is a hot topic right now due to its legalization in many states for either medical, recreational or both uses. The adolescent period of development brings about a new set of challenges for parents, as their teens are most likely to start experimenting with different substances – including marijuana. The legalization of marijuana makes it not only more accessible for teens to use, but there’s also the common belief that marijuana isn’t harmful because it’s derived from plants. If your teen has been using marijuana for non-medical reasons, scientists are starting to explore the implications marijuana use linking to depression.

Marijuana and Depression: Potential Linkages for Adolescents

According to BBC News in 2019, adolescents who smoke marijuana during this time of development are at a 37% increased risk of developing depression by the time they reach adulthood. The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Oxford, with one author stating,

“This is important information for parents and teenagers. The risk is modest, but it can have a devastating impact.”

The National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens (NIDA) explains that when marijuana is inhaled, a person’s heart rate speeds up, the bronchial passages become enlarged, the eyes expand and more – and this truly takes a toll on the body. Medical News Today, a website that publishes various informative articles on health-related topics, estimated in 2017 that 3 million young people between the ages of 12 and 17 have at least one major depressive episode each year; when marijuana is consumed routinely and in excess, adolescents are at a dangerously high risk for damaging their mental health – something that can take months or even years to restore.

Professor Andrea Cipriani, a leader who was involved in the study aforementioned, told The Fix,

“Our findings about depression and suicidality are very relevant for clinical practice and public health. Although the size of the negative effects of cannabis can vary between individual adolescents and it is not possible to predict the exact risk for each teenager, the widespread use of cannabis among the young generations makes it an important health issue.”

For teens who go on to develop depression later on in life, the symptoms can be truly debilitating:

  • Little to no interest in activities that one used to enjoy
  • Isolation
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns
  • Irritability
  • Excessive crying, mood swings and more

Researchers are still exploring the exact reasons behind these linkages, but depression isn’t the only concern that teens have when abusing marijuana.

Dangerous Effects of Marijuana on Teens

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) denotes that teens may experience difficulty with thinking and concentration, which can affect school work, driving, problem-solving, job tasks, home responsibilities and more. Previous research has shown that teens may have trouble with memory and the learning of new skills; studies have shown that THC can affect individuals differently depending on their age, and younger populations – such as adolescents and teens – may find that THC actually harms their CB1 receptors in the brain rather than help them.

Impaired coordination from marijuana use means that more car accidents are likely to occur from teens who are likely still getting used to the idea of driving; in fact, vehicle accidents are considered the leading cause of death among people aged 16 to 19 years old. Marijuana alters teens’ perceptions as well as their attention, balance, coordination, reaction time and more – and without the ability to focus intently, teens are placing their lives in danger.

Why Seeking Help is the Only Option

Marijuana use can quickly become a go-to drug if teens are wanting to socialize with friends or even deal with difficult emotions they’re experiencing. Without proper guidance, some teens may discover that their substance use has harmed them in more ways than one – and that’s why it’s incredibly important for them to seek help early on.

If you have a teen who has been struggling with marijuana abuse, alcoholism or another form of drug abuse, take a stand for their mental, physical and spiritual health and speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. ARCH Academy provides services to teen boys ages 14-18 with resources to help them rediscover themselves in a new light:

  • 12-Step programs
  • Proven clinical therapies
  • Educational services
  • Adventure programming

Substance abuse affects teens differently than it does adults, and that’s why ARCH Academy was created. Teen boys will find that they’re able to complete their education alongside their progression to recovery – and since this is a residential program, adolescents will be well-equipped with everything they need:

  • Nutritious meals
  • Access to counselors and staff
  • Regular communication and updates
  • Recovery activities that foster teamwork and interpersonal skills
  • And more

Teens don’t always realize what can come of their actions, and that’s where we can step in to ensure their safety.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Teen boys e-cigarettesWith the rise of e-cigarettes over the past 15 years, teens have become more accustomed to smoking e-cigarettes and other vaping devices. Local advertisements are a key driver of teen use, as the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) states that 7 out of 10 teens are exposed to e-cigarette ads. Since e-cigarette companies don’t have to report their ingredients, our teens may be receiving more nicotine than they think. In fact, recent studies show that 66% of teens believe there’s just flavoring in their e-cigarettes; the unfortunate reality, however, is that there’s more than that – and it may be prepping our teens to start smoking traditional cigarettes, too.

A 2017 study published in the journal Pediatrics found that e-cigarette usage is an over 30% of high school teens, compared to the single digit numbers that were displayed a few years ago. The authors of the study noted that teens are at an increased risk of vulnerability for traditional cigarette use if the following occur:

  • Risk-taking
  • Impulsiveness
  • Negative affect
  • Low parental support
  • Surrounding oneself with peers who tend to get into trouble
  • E-cigarette use

Furthermore, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine conducted a national sample of 694 adolescent participants ages 16 to 26 years old to explore just what makes one person more susceptible to traditional cigarette use over another. After a year of follow up with these participants, they found that 11 of 16 e-cigarette users had eventually moved to traditional cigarettes; so far, evidence is showing that e-cigarettes aren’t as harmless as they’re made out to be.

If your teen is struggling with substance abuse, speak with someone from the Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights center today. Recovery is right around the corner – be sure they seek help as soon as possible.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

College students with substance use disordersCollege students – young adults – face so many challenges when it comes to addiction because of the accessibility and normalcy associated with college drinking culture. Considered a new-found form of “freedom”, many young adults find themselves testing the boundaries of what they can get by with – and substance abuse is a common ground of exploration for students. Bars are conveniently located near college campuses and weekend parties make it that much easier to use. It’s all fun and games until somebody gets hurt – but unfortunately for many college students, substance use disorders (SUDs) are left untreated.

12-Step programs provide young adults with a support network whom they can rely on in times of need. Many young people aren’t fully aware of the effects of their substance abuse; they often don’t realize the dangerous effects until they’ve developed a full-blown addiction. A 2015 study published in the Journal of Addictive Diseases discovered that many young adults do find hope and support in 12-Step programs; in fact, previous research has shown that social support is an incredibly powerful influencer to those in recovery.

Researchers from around the United States sought to explore the general characteristics of college students who have attended 12-Step programs. In a nationwide survey that was conducted, 486 participants responded – leaving us with some key insight to what our young adults are experiencing around this age:

  • Most students had used multiple substances and had higher levels of SUD severity
  • Twice the national average of college students also smoked
  • Many college students reported series of homelessness and involvement in criminal activity

Co-occurring disorders seem to be a major concern for young adults, and the severity only continues to worsen the longer they avoid seeking help. The best way to combat these issues is to speak up when help is needed – to encourage our loved ones to attend treatment, to support them in recovery and to continue educating our communities on the serious effects of addiction.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Original Article by: Brittany Weiner, WSMV NEWS CHANNEL 4
Originally Posted on: January 29, 2019

As our country fights an opioid crisis, prescriptions for another class of drugs are seeing a steep increase, and they too can be dangerous and addictive. A new study just published this month shows between 2003 and 2015 Benzodiazepine prescriptions have doubled, and about half of them are coming from primary care physicians. Women are twice as likely to be prescribed than men.

Benzodiazepines are used for anxiety and insomnia but they can also be prescribed for chronic pain, and those prescriptions are skyrocketing. “Benzodiazepines are a class of medication that have a significant addiction forming liability,” Chief Medical Officer for Cumberland Heights Foundation, Dr. Chapman Sledge said. “If opioid prescribing goes down there’s some concern that Benzodiazepine prescriptions will continue to go up.” Dr. Sledge says many times these drugs are actually prescribed with opioids. “What we usually see if Benzodiazepine dependence in conjunction with opioid dependence or alcohol dependence,” Dr. Sledge said. A combination that can be dangerous and deadly especially if used long-term.

“Benzodiazepines are not benign drugs,” Dr. Sledge said. “There’s good data that suggests the combination of Benzodiazepines and opioids prescribed together increases the risk of death by fourfold.” According to the study long-term use has also increased with continued prescriptions increasing by 50 percent.

College students: a culture of drinking and drug useCollege students have long been the center of drinking advertisements and commercials, which doesn’t happen by chance. For many years now, colleges have upheld a “drinking culture” that has made it nearly expected for young adults to binge drink as an act on their “freedom” and independence. While it all seems like fun and games, this culture of drinking has sparked a lot of issues in terms of substance abuse and the development of alcoholism later (and even earlier) on. In an interview on WBUR Radio where students talk about college drinking culture, Madeleine D’Angelo, a 21-year-old senior at Boston College in Maryland, stated,

“… [Blacking out is] part of our language. It’s very common to have someone say, ‘Oh, I can’t even remember what happened last night, I blacked out.’”

Sure, drinking is the norm for college students – but what are the statistics on this?

The Dangers of College Drinking Culture: Facts and Statistics

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) reports that about 1,825 college students between the ages of 18-24 die each year from alcohol-related injuries, including vehicle accidents. About 696,000 students are assaulted each year by another student who has been drinking and 97,000 students report alcohol-related sexual assault. A 2017 study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence sought to assess just how prevalent the connection between college drinking culture and issues such as sexual assault was related – of 704 survey responses from males and females in college, researchers discovered that victimization was associated with heavier drinking, along with other factors.

About 20% of college students meet the criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD), yet a very small percentage of these actually seek help for it. If it’s seen as “normal” to drink heavily while in college, it makes sense that many college students aren’t seeing anything wrong with it; what they don’t realize, however, is that peer pressure and experimentation can lead to some dangerous consequences.

Social Work Today previously highlighted the tragic story of a young woman in college who was involved in a tragic accident related to drinking and driving. Emergency room visits are only a lucky outcome for many, compared to the large number of college students who die each year from alcohol-related incidents. Some other direct consequences of alcohol abuse for college students include:

  • Poor academic performance through skipping class and difficulty concentrating
  • Dropouts
  • Injuries
  • Criminal activities
  • Health issues such as liver damage, high blood pressure, inflammation of the pancreas and more

With all of these harmful effects that clearly aren’t taken as seriously as they should be in college settings, what can be done to help our young adults seek help?

Interventions for College Students

NIH Medline Plus suggests that parents talk to their college children early on in the semester that they attend school, so they can successfully adapt to campus life. Parents can also inquire about campus policies regarding alcohol, in addition to following up with their children frequently to ensure their safety.

Ultimately, it’s about changing the drinking culture in colleges by informing students of the real-life consequences that can result from binge drinking. The more support we can provide, the more likely they are to monitor their use or at least consider seeking help if it’s needed.

Many young adults in college fail to achieve major milestones once addiction has entered their lives, which makes recovery that much more important. 12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA) have been evidenced to help many people build their sense of spirituality – a major component that many college students are beginning to face – along with tools and strategies for combating negative thought patterns, triggers, cravings and more. Along with peer-led support groups, such as 12-Step programs, young adults can find the following to be very beneficial for their recovery:

  • Gender specific treatment to meet their needs
  • Experienced healthcare teams who are familiar with addiction and recovery
  • Engagement in a caring yet challenging community as to better equip them with developing a strong recovery identity
  • Close communication with their educational institution, so they can continue reaching towards their academic goals while in recovery
  • Comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and how it affects the mind, body and spirit
  • Individual and group therapy
  • Family therapy, to help rebalance the family system and promote peace at home

Don’t Wait – Seek Help Now

If you’re a college student who may be noticing signs of alcoholism or a related disorder, speak with someone from Cumberland Heights today. The sooner you seek help, the greater the possibility of reversing or minimizing some of the damages that alcohol may have caused to your body. You have an entire life ahead of you, with so many roads and possibilities to take. Make the choice to place your happiness and health as a top priority today – you won’t regret it.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

parental addictionAddiction is difficult to witness at any age, but there’s a tender spot in our hearts that becomes riddled with worry when a beloved parent struggles with addiction. Adult children may not see or speak with their parents as often as they’d like, but that doesn’t mean they don’t care. Discovering that a mother or father has lost their health, finances, relationships and more to addiction is heartbreaking. Many of us want the best for our parents but find that when their substance use gets out of control, there’s no easy path to take. Adult children have to work to make sense of their parent’s substance abuse, and this can take a lot of time and emotional energy.

For many adult children, the lingering effects of addiction, even while they were children, still remain well into adulthood. For example, a few adult children spoke of their experience with parental addiction via BBC News. One person stated, “I tend to only remember a lot of the bad things and also the feelings. That is what stayed with me through my life and is still tangible today; the way that my dad’s drinking and everything that comes with that made me feel.”

A study published in the Journal of Family Issues sought to explore how adult children make sense of their parent’s addiction. The results of the study led to 3 main descriptions that served as the essence of their parent’s struggles:

  • Alcoholism as a disease
  • Alcoholism as a volitional behavior (as a choice)
  • Alcoholism as a socially constructed phenomenon

Many adult children do not know where to turn to and they may use online health forums to better connect with others who are going through similar circumstances. Al-Anon is a supportive, 12-Step program that also provides friends and family members of those with addiction some additional education and support. If you have a parent struggling with alcoholism or drug dependency, seek out help today. Addiction is very difficult to face alone, and it can be devastating to watch a parent experience it. You’re not alone.


Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.

What Does Recovery Mean to You?

If you do a quick search on what recovery means, you’ll likely find a lot of varying definitions. Recovery is a pretty broad term, and while we could narrow it down a bit by adding the context (recovery from a sports injury, recovery from cancer, recovery from alcoholism, etc.), that still doesn’t exactly tell us what it means. The term “recovery” gets used a lot, but did you know that it’s actually quite subjective? We all have different approaches to recovery and what that means for us – so it’s important that while you’re navigating your own road to recovery, you explore the different components that make up that road for you.

When we talk about alcoholism recovery, there are a few recovery components that typically come to mind: sobriety, group therapy (maybe 12-step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous), and relapse prevention. There’s a lot more that can come from this, however, because alcoholism and other addictions can affect nearly every aspect of our lives – our relationships, our finances, our health, our career success and more. A few years ago, researchers wanted to take a peek at how others overcoming substance abuse defined recovery; they found four different domains with 35 recovery elements total. Here is a brief (but not complete) breakdown of what the participants talked about during the study:

  • Abstinence – (withholding from using substances, living a life of sobriety, etc.)
  • Essential Recovery – (being honest with oneself, being able to enjoy life without drinking, etc.)
  • Enriched Recovery – (reacting to the ups and downs of life in a much more balanced and healthy way than before, accepting responsibility for the things one can change, etc.)
  • Spirituality of Recovery – (giving back, helping others, incorporating spirituality or religion, etc.)

The way you describe your story of recovery could inspire others to take a stand for theirs. Specific challenges shape you, and the accomplishments are what make it all worth it. As you continue to build up your strength in building a life that makes you happier and healthier, write down some keywords that stand out to you. Explore what have been some of the most transformational lessons for you so far. Recovery is often described as a lifelong journey, but it’s worth it in the end. As TV host, comedian, and author Craig Ferguson once stated, “I got sober. I stopped killing myself with alcohol. I began to think: ‘Wait a minute – if I can stop doing this, what are the possibilities?’ And slowly it dawned on me that it was maybe worth the risk.”

Cumberland Heights in Chattanooga is a 12-step based outpatient alcohol and drug addiction program. Our Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals 18 and above who may be in the early stages of addiction and alcoholism, or who are experiencing issues with drugs or alcohol. We offer both personalized assessments and flexible treatment hours to suit your needs. If you’re ready to take that first step towards your recovery journey, call us today for more information at 423-308-0689.

Research Reveals Just How Important Support and Service is to Teens in Addiction Recovery

Many would say that our teenage years are some of our most selfish years. As our brains are developing, we’re learning more about what we want and less about what others want. We make decisions, whether or not they’re supported by parents or guardians, and then we experience the consequences of those decisions. It’s a natural part of adolescence to go through these phases, but addiction recovery really places emphasis on the ego – which only further separates a teen from developing close relationships and building a fulfilling, well-balanced life. Despite the fact that many teens aren’t thrilled to volunteer, research is showing that both support and service is incredibly beneficial to teens – especially if they’re in the process of recovering from an addiction.

Last year, researchers from around the U.S. highlighted the fact that there isn’t a lot of national data tracking adolescents with addiction in the correctional system. They wanted to uncover some of the components that help teens maintain sobriety, reduce arrests, and reduce the likelihood of reverting to these behaviors overall. After reviewing a number of other studies, they came up with some key recommendations that have seemed to work time and time again:

  • Support services such as mentoring, therapy and life skills courses have greatly helped adolescents become more confident in their recovery capabilities
  • Faith-based programs (such as AA) do seem to foster a sense of spirituality, and have been shown to lead to greater personal change in teens
  • Volunteer work provides youth with an opportunity to explore how they fit into society and how helping others can affect them in positive ways

There are two main themes that run throughout these examples: focus on the self and focus on others. Personal growth is found when a person is able to really build up a healthy sense of esteem and faith in their own personal capabilities. Teens are at a vulnerable time where peer pressure, traumatic events and more can weigh heavily on their hearts – by strengthening their own coping mechanisms and gaining a better understanding of who they are, they can further help others. Studies have shown that volunteering can bring about a sense of personal fulfillment and can decrease stress.

The more one-on-one attention we can provide for our teens, along with the opportunity to help them help others, the greater their chance of recognizing just how valuable they are – and they’ll have higher chances of staying in recovery.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.


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