Tag Archives: Treatment Center

Tag Archives: Treatment Center


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that by 12th grade, two-thirds of students have tried alcohol and close to two in ten 12th graders report using prescription medication without a prescription. Teen drug abuse is a valid concern amongst many parents, and for good reason – at this developmental stage, teens are likely to experiment, to be swayed by peer pressure and to want to “fit in” – and for those teens who are struggling with symptoms of depression, anxiety or another mental illness, proper resources may seem too far from grasp whereas substances are so easily to obtain.

As a parent, you want to trust your child but at the same time, you want to protect them if they’re encountering situations that could place them in grave danger, such as with substance abuse. Drugfree.org explains several ways to tell if your teen is trying to cover up their substance use:

  • Delayed timing between what they’re saying versus the emotion that’s being shown through their nonverbal cues and facial expressions
  • Reacting out of proportion
  • Less physical expression overall
  • Turning away from the person they’re lying to
  • Responding to direct questions about drug use with general phrases that fail to answer the question
  • Consistently adding in details to fill the silence and to persuade you to believe them
  • Using phrases such as, “To tell you the truth”,To be honest” or “Why would I lie to you?”

It’s an incredibly challenging job to detect when our teens are going through a situation they’re not telling us about, but the best we can do it to get to know their friends, stay up-to-date on what they’re doing, observe any changes in behavior and maintain as much open communication as possible. Through these actions, parents can hopefully prevent their teen from becoming addicted to substances – and if such situations arise, help can be sought immediately.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Woman realizing addiction is disrupting much-needed areas of daily lifeWhen addiction is active, we tend to lose track of responsibilities, time, eating and sleeping patterns and so many other essential parts of daily life, because the brain has become hardwired to only focus on one thing: substance use. Sure, we may be able to get by with several months of work or carrying out family responsibilities for the most part, but let’s face it: addiction really does clutter what could otherwise be a healthily structured life.

As the National Institute of Health (NIH) explains, the prefrontal cortex is involved in all of our decision-making processes (such as with deciding what’s good or bad for us). Repeated drug use can significantly reduce activity in the prefrontal cortex, however – which means that while we normally may have decided to go home for the night so that we can get a good night’s sleep because we have to wake up early in the morning, we no longer have that capability to weight out the consequences – and that’s when addiction can really dampen important areas of our lives. Dr. Nora Volkow, director of NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), stated in 2015,

“When the frontal cortex isn’t working properly, people can’t make the decision to stop taking the drug – even if they realize the price of taking the drug may be extremely high, and they might lose custody of their children or end up in jail. Nonetheless, they take it.”

It is for this reason that it’s much more than simply “quitting” drug use; rather, it often takes a significant intervention for a person to be able to move forward from something that essentially took over them. Harvard Health emphasized that recovery is based on an entirely new learning process – and it’s often done with various strategies, such as with medication assistance, 12-Step programs, individual and group therapy, self-care, structure in residential treatment programs and more.

If you’ve been struggling with addiction, seek the help you need today in order to get your life back on track. Don’t miss another minute.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

People surrendering themselves in recoverySurrender is defined as giving oneself over to something. When we think about this term in the context of active addiction, it’s clear that addiction forces us to surrender; when addiction is severe, we surrender our thoughts, our actions, our relationships, our personal fulfillment, our dreams and our successes. A common thought is that addiction “hijacks” the brain – forcing us to surrender. When substances become so entrenched in our daily lives and in our mind, body and spirit that we no longer have control over our use, we’re essentially surrendering ourselves. We don’t recognize it at the time, but we are.

12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA), mention surrendering as a key step to recovery. Several of the steps, in fact – Steps 3 through 7, to be exact – are all based on the premise of surrender. A few years ago, one writer shared her point of view on surrendering in recovery. She explained to The Fix that surrendering is about letting go of the “ego” – the part of us that wants to be consumed in ourselves, our wants, our needs, our desires, our everything. When we surrender in recovery, we let that need for control go.

The writer from The Fix noted the late scientific work of Dr. Harry Tiebout, a psychiatrist who promoted the work of 12-Step programs to the community at large. It was said that Dr. Tiebout previously quoted,

“Surrender is an unconscious event, not willed by the patient even if he or she should desire to do so. It can occur only when an individual with certain traits in his or her unconscious mind becomes involved in a set of circumstances.”

For those struggling with active addiction, the choice to surrender to God, or another Higher Power, may come from “rock bottom” as many call it – from losing a job, from losing an important relationship, from getting involved in legal trouble – to something else. The point is that in order to overcome the incredible power of this disease, we must surrender ourselves to something greater in order to recover from it.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Having a stable home environment during treatment.Intensive outpatient treatment programs (IOPs) have proven time and time again to be incredibly successful in helping provide resources and support for those in addiction recovery, but it takes someone who is very self-motivated, who doesn’t need detoxification and who has a stable home environment to qualify. Stability at home is a major part of recovery, especially for those in IOPs because they are not going to be heavily monitored, such as those partaking in an inpatient or residential treatment program. If you’re considering joining an IOP, it’s important to consider whether you currently have a stable home environment – and, if you don’t, assessing what changes you can make to ensure that you do.

A 2017 study published in the journal Addiction emphasized that in addition to the basic needs of housing, those in recovery need a stable home environment that brings them joy. They need a space that is conducive to their recovery; there are many aspects of the home environment that can play into this, such as:

  • Not having any substances in the house
  • Having supportive significant others and family members around (and preferably no substance use from them whatsoever in the house)
  • Living somewhere that makes it easy not to use
  • Maintaining a clean, stress-free environment with organization
  • Establishing a daily routine filled with meaningful activities that reinforce recovery goals
  • And more

The University of Minnesota suggests that safety and security, lighting, physical comfort and more can have significant influences on how a person feels. The way the home environment is set up can promote or discourage interactions with others, it can influence motivations and can ultimately influence a person’s mood (which can also influence relapse vulnerability). Ultimately, a person attending an IOP will want to ensure they have a stress-free environment when they return home each day so they can focus solely on their responsibilities and their recovery.

What changes can you make to your home environment, to your work desk and to your daily life to make it easier to carry out your recovery?

Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program in Sumner County Tennessee is designed for people whose needs and schedules vary. A quality intensive outpatient drug and alcohol rehab program will be designed to treat the whole person, not just the addiction. Take the first step by contacting us at 615-356-2700. Recovery is possible, and Hendersonville Treatment can help.

Using spirituality in recoverySpirituality can mean so many different things, but it’s essentially what keeps us grounded in our lives. Spirituality brings us balance, peace, joy and so much more, and it’s something that we all have to work towards each day. 12-Step programs emphasize spirituality because of how truly transformational it is on the heart. For many who have struggled with addiction, there is a void that needs to be filled – and while we try to use substances to fill that gap, they simply don’t work. Throughout recovery, however, we can actively strengthen our spiritual selves to fill the missing pieces in our lives. Let’s take a look at some of the most important aspects of spirituality that we all really need:

  • Hope – when we strengthen our spirituality, we’re likely to have a better outlook on the future. We walk a little taller because we know that everything will be okay – even if we aren’t sure how yet.
  • Compassion and understanding – Mother Theresa once said, “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” As human beings, we’re all fragile; we all make mistakes, we all have regrets and we’ve all experienced pain. Spirituality helps us recognize others’ pain as well as our own, with the ability to be compassionate to others in acknowledgement of what it means to be human.
  • Sense of purpose – a 2017 study published in the journal Addiction emphasized that addiction takes away meaningful life activities and connections that give us a sense of purpose in life; conversely, spirituality brings us closer to ourselves and to a Higher Power, which means we can then become closer to others as well.
  • Inspiration – through sponsorship, individual therapy, group activities and more, those in recovery can find inspiration. Spirituality is about connecting to others and coming together as a community – both of which only serve to strengthen love and hope.
  • Peace of mind – when we place less emphasis on ourselves, we can have a peace of mind in knowing that we are on the right path for a reason. Spirituality gives us this sense of peace by allowing us to overflow with stability, love and balance.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Man with functioning alcoholism.The most common depiction of a person with alcoholism (shown in movies, television shows, etc.) is someone who cannot pay their bills, who has lost all friends and family, who has recently lost their job and someone who is otherwise at “rock bottom”. These images come to mind so quickly because they’ve been ingrained in our minds ever since we saw them in the media. The problem with this depiction, however, is that it’s not entirely true. Of course, there are some people who do hit “rock bottom” – but there are many others who live a seemingly “put-together” life. In fact, according to Bustle magazine, an older study published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) noted that only 10% of those with alcoholism are actually homeless/low functioning.

Stephen Ross, MD, told Everyday Health in 2016,

“What it means to be a [person with functioning alcoholism] is that you can be addicted to drinking and continue to function in certain domains. [Those with functional alcoholism] drink heavily once they get home from work and yet they are still able to get up the next day…”

Ward Richmond, a father and husband, once explained on Medium of his own experiencing with functioning alcoholism. He stated in 2018 that he too once viewed someone with alcoholism as hitting “rock bottom” – but when he started hearing concern from his loved ones about his alcohol use, he quickly released that he was just as capable of developing alcoholism. In fact, before he recognized that he needed help, he took pride in his drinking habits, almost as if he should be awarded “life of the party”.

Many people with functioning alcoholism can feel this way, as it’s often the after-hour work meetings and social hours with friends on the weekends that place the symptoms of alcoholism in their “best light”. If you have been struggling with alcoholism, make the decision to seek help today. Recovery is right around the corner – and it’s time for you to embrace it.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Man finding success in sobrietyLiving a life of sobriety takes a lot of time and consideration, especially as a person must figure out over time what boosts their motivation for recovery versus what hinders it. No matter how long you’ve been working towards your recovery thus far, it’s important to think about the various factors that have made up your sobriety and how well it’s worked for you. Assessment is a critical tool for recovery because it allows you to think about what’s working and what’s not – which ultimately allows you to make changes to your daily structure. If you’re ready to boost your success in recovery, consider making sure that the following factors are in place:

  • Abstinence from substances
  • Attending lectures on addiction
  • Engaging in small group discussions
  • Assessing your recovery through written tasks (such as through journaling, diary keeping, self-analysis, etc.)
  • Individual and group therapy
  • Sports
  • Building your spirituality through prayer, meditation, yoga and more

As a 2015 study published in the journal Russian Psychological Society noted, many people fail in recovery because they do not have the correct structure set in place. Sobriety is truly a lifestyle, which means that it incorporates your mind, body and spirit. Those who are most successful in recovery go on to develop nearly every aspect of their lives and, in turn, reap so many benefits from it.

12-Step participation is a key form of support for those in recovery, as they’re able to establish meaningful connections with peers and receive guidance from a sponsor. Education on addiction is provided as well, and the weekly structure of 12-Step meetings only further emphasizes recovery goals. As American writer Ramona L. Anderson once stated,

“People spend a lifetime searching for happiness; looking for peace. They chase idle dreams, addictions, religions, even other people, hoping to fill the emptiness that plagues them. The irony is the only place they ever needed to search was within.”

Start building your life of recovery today. It’s never too late.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Relationships that harm recoveryAs previous research has shown us, one of the biggest influencers of recovery is support. Having someone by our side to lean on, to tell when things aren’t going the way we’d like for them to, to share our victories with – it all matters, and it can either pull us up (or push us down) in recovery.

Involvement in treatment is one of the biggest predictors of recovery success, but if we spend our time building our recovery with the wrong type of connections, we may wind up taking a few steps back in recovery – which is certainly not what we want.

Whether you’re in a 12-Step program or are meeting people through other avenues, it’s important to be careful in choosing who you invite to become part of your support system. Check out the following connections that may not be doing you any good:

  1. Keeping friends from the past. A 2015 study published in the journal Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy found that those who associated themselves more with non-using friends and less with friends who used to use actually experienced a better quality of life.
  2. Making friends with someone who attends 12-Step meetings but isn’t sober. We all know of that person who attends but isn’t 100% committed. Be wary of these types of connections because they could ultimately bring your recovery progress down – even if that wasn’t the original intention.
  3. Trying desperately to maintain connections with friends or family who do not support your recovery. As the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) notes, there are many reasons why family members may be unsupportive right now. The best you can do is let them know that you care and that you’re trying, and then give them space to work through their concerns while you continue to focus on your recovery.

The people we let into our lives can significantly alter the paths we take, so it’s wise to consider who you let in.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Exploring types of connections in addiction recovery communities.The people whom we spend our time with are the ones who often have the biggest impact on our recovery. This is often because the conversations, activities and thoughts that are shared become taken into consideration by ourselves, which can cause us to take different paths along the way. Recovery communities are strong yet vulnerable communities because they’ve experienced trauma, substance abuse and more. Thus, social connections are a huge area of concern for those in recovery due to the significant influence they can have on us.

According to a 2017 study published in the journal Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, positive networks and social processes help those in recovery establish and maintain structure in recovery. These social connections could develop from:

  • Volunteer work
  • Self-help groups such as 12-Step programs
  • Recreational activities
  • Training and employment
  • And more

In fact, previous research has shown that the more we engage ourselves with supportive others in recovery (such as with a sponsor in a 12-Step program), the more likely we are to not only participate in treatment to a greater extent, but also to remain abstinent for a longer period of time.

Recovery communities essentially undergo a change in perspective when it comes to self-identity. Towards the beginning of recovery, individuals may view themselves as “addicts” but, over time and with the right social support system, they will come to view themselves as people in recovery. With this change in self-perception comes a change in lifestyle – one that is more conducive to sobriety. Recovery communities restore their mind, body and spirit through a number of therapies, activities and treatment modalities, but social support is one of the strongest influencers because those whom we spend our time with can carry such a great influence on our mind and spirit.

As American essayist, lecturer and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson once stated,

“The one person you are destined to be is the person you decide to be.”

Surround yourself with people who uplift you, inspire you and cheer you on. The more genuine support we can achieve, the greater our strength in recovery.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Are you letting your thoughts hold you back in addiction recovery?Sometimes recovery can feel like a maze; you take these twists and turns, and winding roads, with no clear idea as to where you’re going. It’s normal for those in recovery to feel a bit “lost” along the way – in fact, it’s normal for anyone to feel that way. As humans, we don’t have the answer to everything – and there’s no way of knowing what lies ahead until we get there. While we can’t control the future, what we can control is how we think about it. The mind is a powerful tool that shapes our reality through perception, and the thoughts we place meaning to are the ones that guide that perception.

When it comes to addiction recovery, thoughts are what can make or break us if we let them. It’s so easy to become tempted by the negativity – by the thoughts that tell us we’re not going to succeed, or that we don’t know what we’re doing or that we’re only going to make it so far. A huge portion of what therapy teaches us, however, is that thoughts in and of themselves are not that important. In fact, we have very little control over our thoughts, but what we do have control over is whether or not we’d like to place meaning to them.

If you’ve been finding that you’re more cynical lately, it could be that you’re placing more emphasis on negative thoughts over positive ones. Without even realizing it, you could be sabotaging your own recovery – and all by assuming that the thoughts you’re experiencing actually deserve to hold weight in your life. From now on, whenever you have a negative thought, try combatting it with something positive. Even if it’s uncomfortable (because it may be, especially if your brain has become used to this pattern), purposefully choose to place emphasis on thoughts that boost your perception of recovery rather than thoughts that make you feel bad about your progress.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.


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