Tag Archives: Treatment Center

Tag Archives: Treatment Center


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NASHVILLE, TN JANUARY 22, 2020 – Cumberland Heights is proud to announce it has become the only addiction treatment center in the state of Tennessee to achieve the national Blue Distinction Center designation given by Blue Cross Blue Shield.

Cumberland Heights is proud to announce it has become the only addiction treatment center in the state of Tennessee to achieve the national Blue Distinction Center designation given by Blue Cross Blue Shield

The program recognizes providers that demonstrate expertise in delivering quality specialty care in a way that is safe, effective and cost efficient. The goal of the program, according to Blue Cross Blue Shield, is to help consumers find both higher quality and more affordable healthcare for their specialty care needs, while providing a credible foundation on which employers may customize their employee benefits. Designations are awarded based on criteria that support delivery of timely, coordinated, multi-disciplinary, evidence-based care with a focus on quality improvement and patient-centered care.

The designation for Cumberland Heights comes on the heels
of another big announcement. Late last month our facility became the first addiction treatment center in Tennessee, and one of the first in the nation, to achieve certification by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

“Both the Blue Distinction designation and the ASAM certification are big honors and affirms our dedication to provide the highest level of care to our patients and their families. We take pride in carrying on traditions created here more than 50 years ago, while also being at the forefront of cutting-edge practices to give patients the tools they need to live a life free from addiction,” said CEO Jay Crosson.


About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. For more than 53 years we’ve helped those struggling rewrite their story and live a life filled with hope.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NASHVILLE, TN DECEMBER 17, 2019 – Cumberland Heights is proud to announce it has become not only the first addiction treatment center in the state of Tennessee to achieve certification from the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), but also one of the first in the nation.

The ASAM Level of Care certification, created in partnership with CARF International (CARF), provides an independent, comprehensive assessment of an addiction treatment program’s capacity to deliver services consistent with Levels of Care described in The ASAM Criteria. The certification will help patients and payers identify treatment programs capable of delivering evidence-based care.

“This certification really speaks to the quality of care Cumberland Heights has been providing for more than 53 years. Today, there are so many options when it comes to addiction treatment. When you choose a facility that is ASAM certified, you know you or your loved one is going to a place that incorporates research, science, technology and compassion to create a path to life-long recovery,” said CEO Jay Crosson.

Certification through ASAM marks a significant development in the addiction treatment industry which has long struggled to establish consistent standards nationwide. The ASAM Criteria is considered the nation’s most respected, comprehensive and widely used set of standards for providing outcome-oriented care. It was developed over three decades of research and will help place patients in a care setting that suits their individual needs.

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. For more than 53 years we’ve helped those struggling rewrite their story and live a life free from addiction.

About This Course:

WHEN: Wednesday, February 26 & Thursday, February 27
TIME: 8:00AM – 5:00AM
WHERE: Cumberland Heights River Road Campus (8283 River Road Pike, Nashville)
COST: *Includes Breakfast and Lunch on All Training Days

$75 – December 25th – January 25th (Early Bird Registration)
$120 – January 26th – February 14th

Who Should Attend: Anyone interested in sharpening their DBT skills, you do NOT have to have previously attended the Part 1 training to take this course, however, if you are preparing to teach DBT in the future, you will need to attend the first part of the DBT training series.

This course is designed to introduce students to the skills training aspects of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). It includes introductions to the four categories of DBT Skills. Students are introduced to the strategies and styles of running a DBT Skills class.  They also participate in an actual DBT class, including completing homework, completing skills worksheets, etc. to provide an immersive and ‘hands-on’ experience. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on the importance of comprehensive, culturally-sensitive, individualized assessment and intervention.

 

16 CEUs awarded, NAADAC and NBCC approved.

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Course Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Refresh their knowledge of the foundations of DBT.
  2. Gain basic knowledge of DBT skills.
  3. Gain skills and stylistic strategies to conduct DBT Skills classes.
  4. Appreciate the experience of Skills class participants by participating in an actual DBT skills class.
  5. Understand how to individualize Skills for respective clients through observing role-plays/demonstrations and participating in ‘hands-on’ practice.
  6. Conduct basic behavioral analysis and suggest more effective behaviors
  7. Understand how to integrate Dialectics into DBT practice
  8. Know the four categories of DBT Skills and the skills therein.
  9. Participate in mindfulness activities.

Course Expectations

  1. Student Expectations: Students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior, which means: attending class; arriving to and leaving class at the scheduled time; informing the instructor when leaving class early (please do so minimally), turning cell phones to silent, vibrate, or off; not texting, emailing, tweeting, etc. in class; coming to class alone and without children, family, and friends who are not registered in the course; returning to class on-time after breaks; coming prepared to participate in class discussion; asking questions and/or giving feedback; limiting the use of laptop computers (with the exception of taking class notes) and other electronic devices; engaging in courteous communication with instructors and peers inside and outside of the classroom; and showing respect for others’ opinions. If your use of electronic devices is distracting to anyone in the classroom, including the instructor, you will be asked to turn off the device and/or leave the classroom. When communicating with instructors or peers, in person or electronically, please be aware that standards of professional behavior apply. Integral to higher education is the exchange of ideas, which may include new, controversial and/or diverse ideas, and sometimes we will not agree with the ideas we encounter in readings, discussions, or class presentations. However, under all circumstances, we will treat others with respect and act professionally. Students are responsible for their own learning and contributing to a larger learning community in the classroom. It is imperative that students be present in order to learn valuable skills for social work practice. If a student misses three (3) or more classes, he/she risks not passing the course.
  2. Instructor Expectations: Instructor is expected to demonstrate professional behavior, which means: attending class; arriving to and leaving class at the scheduled time; informing students of changes to the course syllabus; informing students of changes to the class schedule; providing students with classroom time to work on course assignments; providing clear expectations on course assignments; providing clear and concise feedback on course assignments; returning assignments to students in a timely manner, and replying promptly to e-mail. Integral to higher education is the exchange of ideas, which may include new, controversial and/or diverse ideas, and sometimes we will not agree with the ideas we encounter in readings, discussions, or class presentations. However, under all circumstances, we will treat others with respect and act professionally.
    1. Course Assignments: All students will be given a homework assignment which is due the second day of the training. No extension requests will be approved on assignments that are due within the next 48 hours.
    2. Incompletes: All participants are required to attend the entire 2-day course in order to receive full CE’s.
    3. Safety: As part of professional education, students will be engaging with the community. As such, this may present some risks. Sound choices and caution may lower risks inherent to the profession. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and ensure personal safety. Students should notify the appropriate authority regarding any safety concerns.
    4. Confidentiality: Personal disclosure is not an expectation or requirement of this course. However, it may be appropriate for students to share information during class as it relates to learning about a particular topic. Students are expected to adhere to all professional standards of confidentiality during the semester.

At the end of the training, students will have the opportunity to evaluate the course and the instructor using the official University of Utah course and instructor evaluation. This course is based on the premise that much of our learning is from one another.  We each bring our experiences, knowledge, and analyses to realms of mutual learning and reflections.  Such learning requires the student to constructively participate.

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How the time spent in treatment can influence your recovery

It’s easy to believe that addiction recovery is a “quick fix” – that if you simply attend a week-long treatment program, all of those cravings for substances will go away. The reality is that addiction is a deep-rooted disease that developed over time – and just as it took some time to develop, it will take some time to recover from, too. One of the most common misconceptions about treatment is that it will be quick and easy, and this one of the many reasons why a person may drop out of treatment or have to come back, time and time again.

If you or a loved one are currently considering seeking treatment for addiction, it’s time to get down the facts: time spent in treatment is crucial, and length of time in treatment can influence recovery outcomes.

Aspects of Treatment That Are Important

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) notes that the length of time spent in treatment may vary from person to person, because of individual circumstances and severity of the addiction. This is true – but in many cases, there are other issues that need to be addressed, such as with mental health, spirituality concerns, a need for a stronger social support system and more. Typically participation in a treatment program isn’t as effective if a person only attends for less than 90 days; with that being said, how time is spent in treatment is also of considerable importance.

There are several principles that should be noted regarding treatment:

  • Addiction is a complex disease, but it is treatable – and because it affects the brain so heavily, it will take time to heal and restore.
  • Each person has different needs, so there may need to be slight adjustments to a person’s treatment plan – and, at Cumberland Heights, you can work with a caring team of individuals who want to help you move forward in the best way possible.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available so that a person can become integrated into sobriety, and this is why residential treatment programs, such as the ones offered at Cumberland Heights, can be so helpful.
  • Effective treatment should tend to more needs than simply the addiction at hand; for example, Cumberland Heights offers 12-Step programs to assist individuals with developing a stronger sense of spirituality and creating a life that is focused on the understanding of a Higher Power.
  • Remaining in treatment for an appropriate amount of time is crucial to a person’s recovery – and, as NIDA indicates, at least 3 months is needed for evidenced progress to take place. However, if a person has a more severe addiction, longer durations will be needed.
  • Behavioral therapies, such as family counseling and group therapy, can make a world of difference in a person’s life. When attending these, along with other recovery-related activities such as 12-Step programs and outdoor activities, can boost a person’s self-esteem and confidence in recovery.
  • Constant assessment must be made over time to ensure that a person’s treatment plan is working efficiently for them.

If you’ve already made a plan to seek treatment, consider how long you’d like to stay – and what amount of time you feel would be most beneficial in achieving your recovery goals realistically.

What Research Shows

A 2015 study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence found that, after assessing 284 individuals in a residential treatment program, the percentage of days in treatment in addition to the percentage of days actively involved in recovery-related activities had a significant impact on their recovery outcomes. For example, 12-Step program involvement – such as having a sponsor, completing step work, contacting 12-Step members outside of meetings and more) was shown to increase abstinence over time. The study showed that participants who took part in 5 activities were 3.2 times greater to achieve abstinence than participants who took on 1 recovery-related activity. Altogether, this shows that what you become involved in during your time in treatment can have a significant influence on how your recovery is carried out.

A 2018 study titled, “Beyond Abstinence”: Changes in Indices of Quality of Life with Time in Recovery in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adults” found that the first year is most indicative of “drops” in self-esteem and quality of life – and that’s likely because the first year of recovery is considered to be the hardest. With this in mind, the amount of time spent in treatment can really set a person’s foundation for how they manage the rest of their lives.

Seek Help Today

If you’re ready to build a solid foundation in recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. It’s never too late to start building the life you’ve always dreamed of – but it starts with the mind, body and soul.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Men breaking down the barriers for addiction treatment

Just last year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) noted that men are more likely than women to use almost all types of illicit substances; despite the growing number of people who classify as having substance use disorders (SUDs), there are yet many who do not seek treatment. Men are at the forefront of this issue in many cases, because of the stigma behind seeking help. Whether it’s you or a loved one who needs treatment, it’s important to break down the barriers surrounding this issue – because many men are experiencing difficulties in not only seeking help but even in opening up once they’re enrolled in a treatment program.

Men-Specific Issues in Recovery

A publication by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) explained that men experience barriers in nearly all aspects of treatment – from calling and seeking help in finding a job later on. It’s not uncommon for male clients to feel threatened upon beginning the recovery process; after all, our society has placed a strenuous emphasis on masculinity and there’s a direct fear to being perceived as “weak” if help is sought. Men may become overly sensitive on the topic of having a “problem”, and it’s important that healthcare teams try to understand the person as a whole compared to focusing solely on the addiction.

The following are some facts about men-specific issues when it comes to addiction recovery, and these can translate into problematic encounters in treatment as well:

  • Men have higher rates of dependence on illicit drugs
  • Men are more likely to go to emergency rooms or experience overdose deaths from illicit drugs compared to women
  • Men are less likely to identify stigmatization as a barrier to treatment

As an extension to the challenging masculinity expectations that society places on men, there are also many instances of childhood traumatization; in these cases, addiction isn’t the only concern for men – but it’s incredibly difficult to talk about, and many men would prefer to keep it quiet than to work through these issues with a therapist.

The Good Men Project, a movement designed to help men start speaking about the problems they face, explained that men hold their pain close to their chest. When men feel pain, they tend to hold onto it and not speak about it, which can lead to a number of difficult circumstances:

  • Depression
  • Anger problems
  • Addiction
  • Sleeplessness
  • Chronic unhappiness
  • Self-protection and defensiveness

Writer Sean Swaby explained it like this:

“Men everywhere are in pain. I recently attended a men’s group and was reassured that I am not alone. I sat night after night with a group of the bravest men I know, telling stories of their pain. Most men have faced trauma, but we just hold it in and say very little about it.”

Even men who’ve managed to work diligently in recovery will find that it’s hard to obtain employment after treatment; Harvard Medical School acknowledges that in some cases, guilt, shame and embarrassment, alongside workplace stigma, can hold men back from achieving success in the workplace.

With so many men facing difficulties speaking up about the psychological pain they’re going through, how can men specifically be supported in addiction recovery?

Supporting Men in Recovery at Cumberland Heights

DrugFree.org emphasizes the impact that communication can have in recovery. Therapists and other healthcare professionals can be there to implement healthy coping strategies – and with a team full of people who care and a program full of others who understand it, it becomes easier for men to open up. All-male group therapy, such as the ones provided at Cumberland Heights, assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a recovery lifestyle.

The men’s program, in particular, is up to 30 days in length and is for men ages 18 and up. The fundamental teachings of the 12-Step program are followed, which provide a clear path for men to work through; there are also a few other all-male programs offered at Cumberland Heights designed specifically to address unique needs to men:

Extended Care Program for Men-Only: this program is up to 180 days in length and can be used to help men who’ve already completed a treatment program but would like something to help them transition to everyday life.

Sober Living Program for Men: this program is a sober living home that encourages participation in aftercare meetings, community involvement and sober activities amongst other men in the program.

Seek Help Today

If you’re ready to take on a program that caters to your unique needs, speak with a professional at Cumberland Heights today. We offer various men-only programs to provide men with a secure environment where they can thrive. Don’t wait any longer to change your life for the better.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that by 12th grade, two-thirds of students have tried alcohol and close to two in ten 12th graders report using prescription medication without a prescription. Teen drug abuse is a valid concern amongst many parents, and for good reason – at this developmental stage, teens are likely to experiment, to be swayed by peer pressure and to want to “fit in” – and for those teens who are struggling with symptoms of depression, anxiety or another mental illness, proper resources may seem too far from grasp whereas substances are so easily to obtain.

As a parent, you want to trust your child but at the same time, you want to protect them if they’re encountering situations that could place them in grave danger, such as with substance abuse. Drugfree.org explains several ways to tell if your teen is trying to cover up their substance use:

  • Delayed timing between what they’re saying versus the emotion that’s being shown through their nonverbal cues and facial expressions
  • Reacting out of proportion
  • Less physical expression overall
  • Turning away from the person they’re lying to
  • Responding to direct questions about drug use with general phrases that fail to answer the question
  • Consistently adding in details to fill the silence and to persuade you to believe them
  • Using phrases such as, “To tell you the truth”,To be honest” or “Why would I lie to you?”

It’s an incredibly challenging job to detect when our teens are going through a situation they’re not telling us about, but the best we can do it to get to know their friends, stay up-to-date on what they’re doing, observe any changes in behavior and maintain as much open communication as possible. Through these actions, parents can hopefully prevent their teen from becoming addicted to substances – and if such situations arise, help can be sought immediately.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Woman realizing addiction is disrupting much-needed areas of daily lifeWhen addiction is active, we tend to lose track of responsibilities, time, eating and sleeping patterns and so many other essential parts of daily life, because the brain has become hardwired to only focus on one thing: substance use. Sure, we may be able to get by with several months of work or carrying out family responsibilities for the most part, but let’s face it: addiction really does clutter what could otherwise be a healthily structured life.

As the National Institute of Health (NIH) explains, the prefrontal cortex is involved in all of our decision-making processes (such as with deciding what’s good or bad for us). Repeated drug use can significantly reduce activity in the prefrontal cortex, however – which means that while we normally may have decided to go home for the night so that we can get a good night’s sleep because we have to wake up early in the morning, we no longer have that capability to weight out the consequences – and that’s when addiction can really dampen important areas of our lives. Dr. Nora Volkow, director of NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), stated in 2015,

“When the frontal cortex isn’t working properly, people can’t make the decision to stop taking the drug – even if they realize the price of taking the drug may be extremely high, and they might lose custody of their children or end up in jail. Nonetheless, they take it.”

It is for this reason that it’s much more than simply “quitting” drug use; rather, it often takes a significant intervention for a person to be able to move forward from something that essentially took over them. Harvard Health emphasized that recovery is based on an entirely new learning process – and it’s often done with various strategies, such as with medication assistance, 12-Step programs, individual and group therapy, self-care, structure in residential treatment programs and more.

If you’ve been struggling with addiction, seek the help you need today in order to get your life back on track. Don’t miss another minute.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

People surrendering themselves in recoverySurrender is defined as giving oneself over to something. When we think about this term in the context of active addiction, it’s clear that addiction forces us to surrender; when addiction is severe, we surrender our thoughts, our actions, our relationships, our personal fulfillment, our dreams and our successes. A common thought is that addiction “hijacks” the brain – forcing us to surrender. When substances become so entrenched in our daily lives and in our mind, body and spirit that we no longer have control over our use, we’re essentially surrendering ourselves. We don’t recognize it at the time, but we are.

12-Step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA), mention surrendering as a key step to recovery. Several of the steps, in fact – Steps 3 through 7, to be exact – are all based on the premise of surrender. A few years ago, one writer shared her point of view on surrendering in recovery. She explained to The Fix that surrendering is about letting go of the “ego” – the part of us that wants to be consumed in ourselves, our wants, our needs, our desires, our everything. When we surrender in recovery, we let that need for control go.

The writer from The Fix noted the late scientific work of Dr. Harry Tiebout, a psychiatrist who promoted the work of 12-Step programs to the community at large. It was said that Dr. Tiebout previously quoted,

“Surrender is an unconscious event, not willed by the patient even if he or she should desire to do so. It can occur only when an individual with certain traits in his or her unconscious mind becomes involved in a set of circumstances.”

For those struggling with active addiction, the choice to surrender to God, or another Higher Power, may come from “rock bottom” as many call it – from losing a job, from losing an important relationship, from getting involved in legal trouble – to something else. The point is that in order to overcome the incredible power of this disease, we must surrender ourselves to something greater in order to recover from it.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Having a stable home environment during treatment.Intensive outpatient treatment programs (IOPs) have proven time and time again to be incredibly successful in helping provide resources and support for those in addiction recovery, but it takes someone who is very self-motivated, who doesn’t need detoxification and who has a stable home environment to qualify. Stability at home is a major part of recovery, especially for those in IOPs because they are not going to be heavily monitored, such as those partaking in an inpatient or residential treatment program. If you’re considering joining an IOP, it’s important to consider whether you currently have a stable home environment – and, if you don’t, assessing what changes you can make to ensure that you do.

A 2017 study published in the journal Addiction emphasized that in addition to the basic needs of housing, those in recovery need a stable home environment that brings them joy. They need a space that is conducive to their recovery; there are many aspects of the home environment that can play into this, such as:

  • Not having any substances in the house
  • Having supportive significant others and family members around (and preferably no substance use from them whatsoever in the house)
  • Living somewhere that makes it easy not to use
  • Maintaining a clean, stress-free environment with organization
  • Establishing a daily routine filled with meaningful activities that reinforce recovery goals
  • And more

The University of Minnesota suggests that safety and security, lighting, physical comfort and more can have significant influences on how a person feels. The way the home environment is set up can promote or discourage interactions with others, it can influence motivations and can ultimately influence a person’s mood (which can also influence relapse vulnerability). Ultimately, a person attending an IOP will want to ensure they have a stress-free environment when they return home each day so they can focus solely on their responsibilities and their recovery.

What changes can you make to your home environment, to your work desk and to your daily life to make it easier to carry out your recovery?

Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program in Sumner County Tennessee is designed for people whose needs and schedules vary. A quality intensive outpatient drug and alcohol rehab program will be designed to treat the whole person, not just the addiction. Take the first step by contacting us at 615-356-2700. Recovery is possible, and Hendersonville Treatment can help.

Using spirituality in recoverySpirituality can mean so many different things, but it’s essentially what keeps us grounded in our lives. Spirituality brings us balance, peace, joy and so much more, and it’s something that we all have to work towards each day. 12-Step programs emphasize spirituality because of how truly transformational it is on the heart. For many who have struggled with addiction, there is a void that needs to be filled – and while we try to use substances to fill that gap, they simply don’t work. Throughout recovery, however, we can actively strengthen our spiritual selves to fill the missing pieces in our lives. Let’s take a look at some of the most important aspects of spirituality that we all really need:

  • Hope – when we strengthen our spirituality, we’re likely to have a better outlook on the future. We walk a little taller because we know that everything will be okay – even if we aren’t sure how yet.
  • Compassion and understanding – Mother Theresa once said, “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” As human beings, we’re all fragile; we all make mistakes, we all have regrets and we’ve all experienced pain. Spirituality helps us recognize others’ pain as well as our own, with the ability to be compassionate to others in acknowledgement of what it means to be human.
  • Sense of purpose – a 2017 study published in the journal Addiction emphasized that addiction takes away meaningful life activities and connections that give us a sense of purpose in life; conversely, spirituality brings us closer to ourselves and to a Higher Power, which means we can then become closer to others as well.
  • Inspiration – through sponsorship, individual therapy, group activities and more, those in recovery can find inspiration. Spirituality is about connecting to others and coming together as a community – both of which only serve to strengthen love and hope.
  • Peace of mind – when we place less emphasis on ourselves, we can have a peace of mind in knowing that we are on the right path for a reason. Spirituality gives us this sense of peace by allowing us to overflow with stability, love and balance.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.


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