Tag Archives: We Transform Lives

Tag Archives: We Transform Lives


Is Your Family Stuck in Patterns of Addiction?  We can help.  Contact Cumberland Heights today!Cumberland Heights recognizes addiction is a family disease and developed its family program to help educate and guide patients’ families as they navigate their way toward recovery. In our Family Program we show families how to rebuild vital pieces of their relationships, including trust, boundaries, and communication by utilizing experiential and therapeutic group exercise.

If you find yourself stuck in any of the following patterns you may find a family program helpful:

  • Repeatedly bailing your loved one out – of jail, financial problems, and other tight spots
  • Giving them “one more chance” – then another…and another…
  • Ignoring the problem – because they get defensive when you bring it up, you hope it will magically go away, or they will grow out of it
  • Joining them in the behavior when you know they have a problem with it – drinking, gambling, etc.
  • Joining them in blaming others – for their own feelings, problems and misfortunes
  • Accepting their justifications, excuses and rationalizations – “I’m destroying myself with alcohol because I’m depressed.”
  • Avoiding problems – keeping the peace, believing a lack of conflict will help
  • Doing things for them they should be able to do for themselves
  • Softening or removing natural consequences
  • Trying to fix them or their problem or situation
  • Repeatedly coming to the rescue
  • Feeling Responsible for their problem
  • Trying to control your loved one’s behaviors, whereabouts, activities, friends, etc.
  • Waiting for the other shoe to drop
  • Walking on eggshells
  • Being caught in the middle attempting to keep or create peace
  • Keeping secrets
  • Isolating from friends or family
  • Making excuses for inappropriate behaviors
  • Unable to focus due to preoccupation with your loved one
  • Feeling exhausted, unappreciated, and cannot seem to do enough

New Starts in Recovery

 

For many, January signifies the start of something new: a new year, new resolutions, a new start. Many people make resolutions hoping to meet personal goals or to improve their quality of life. New Year’s resolutions are also reminiscent of the commitment we make to recovery. The first step we take in recovery is a step toward a new start.

The following are reflections on new starts in recovery from Cumberland Heights’ staff members:

A life in recovery from drugs and alcohol is a wonderful life with many new beginnings. A few of the many gifts I’ve received have been, stronger and deeper relationships with friends and family, a new way of living life with peace and serenity, and a greater understanding and love for myself and others. John Boolos (Case Manager, Men’s Department)


For me “New Start” has meant opportunity, and new found hope. A “New Start” has afforded me the opportunity to be the son, friend, brother, uncle and peer I feel I was meant to be. In active addiction I was far from the person I feel I was meant to be, but I felt completely hopeless. An overwhelming fear I had lost my authentic self, someone not only my family and friends missed, but I did as well. A new beginning filled me with the hope the real me was not gone, just lost. It was up to me to put in the work to find him again. With new found hope and a Higher Power of my understanding, I received the power and direction needed to find myself and sustain my recovery.  ~ Conner Davidson CPRS (Clinical Associate Team Leader, Young Men’s Department)


New Starts to me is the opportunity to get this thing called life right, and live it the way God intends me to live. With new starts, and the program of recovery I’ve not only been able to find myself, but actually love myself again. (Being worthy is a hard thing to feel when in active addiction.) I’ve been given what I call my dream job, and I get to have true happiness in my life because of new starts. None of it would be possible if I didn’t come to Cumberland Heights to find out I needed a program, a tribe, and a family of other like-minded people to help support me, care for me and encourage me along the way. In my New Start, I found God, the program and myself. ~ April Sambuco (Human Resources Generalist)


For me, I see the opportunity for New Starts more like a “Personal Renovation.” Much like fixing up an old house, the framework is there, but in active addiction I allowed my house to become dilapidated and unlivable. Luckily on September 5, 2005, I was given the opportunity to hire a new “interior designer,” (which I currently identify as my Higher Power) to remodel this ole house. A relationship with my Higher Power and the 12-Step program has given me a new “Design” for living. In recovery I’ve become a father to two beautiful children, I’ve been an employee at Cumberland Heights for 10 years, and I have wonderful relationships with my family again. I’ve been sober for over 12 years, and none of this would be possible without my New Start. As we start this New Year I look forward to many more opportunities for New Starts. ~ Travis W. Hupp, LADAC II (Clinical Coordinator, Men’s Program)


One of the worst things about my addiction was the rotting ball of shame and guilt I carried around in my gut every day. Made up of lies, failures, losses, wrong choices, and missed opportunities, I couldn’t get away from it unless I drank and used. Even then, it always came back when the high wore off. After a while, it was with me even with the alcohol and drugs—a horrible mess of feelings I couldn’t name. What a relief to hear the Third Step Prayer and know I could ask a Power greater than myself to “relieve me of the bondage of self.” It was scary to think about turning my will and my life over to the care of this Power I wasn’t totally sure would take care of me, but considering the alternative, I was willing to give it a try. People told me to try it one day at a time, one hour at a time, one minute at a time, as often as necessary. Each time I was willing to follow that suggestion, I could start again. I could have a New Start anytime I was willing to ask for help. The ball of shame and guilt began to unravel—sometimes quickly and sometimes slowly, as the Big Book says. Today, that ball is mostly a memory. And, if I start to feel that old sludge, thanks to a 12-Step program, its fellowship, and a Power greater than me, a New Start is always within reach. ~ Cinde Stewart Freeman, RN, LADAC, QCS (Chief Clinical Officer)

How have you experienced New Starts in your recovery? Please share your experience with us in the comments below.

Cumberland Heights 2017 Alumni Holiday PartyThe Alumni Association of Cumberland Heights invites you to share the gifts of the season with our current patients. Friday, December 8, 2017 at 7PM, we will be gathering in the Dining Hall to spread hope and cheer! The party will include:

  • A special performance by “The Jolly Jinglers”
  • Pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus
  • BINGO
  • Presentation of gifts to the patients and
  • a Gratitude meeting

The holiday season can be a tough time of year for those in recovery. Please join us in supporting our current patients and your fellow alumni. Your presence brings a sense of hope and happiness to those we serve.

Bring a dessert or an appetizer if you wish!

Components of a Continuing Care PlanWhen I was a patient at Cumberland Heights the idea of leaving the bubble to begin life in recovery was overwhelming. Luckily, I did not have to figure out how to live life on life’s terms alone. I had a counselor and case manager who collaborated on a Continuing Care Plan that would guide me toward resources which would help me develop skills to remain clean and sober one day at a time.

A Continuing Care Plan is developed and managed by a patient’s Case Manager. It’s comprised of several clinical recommendations by a patient’s treatment team and designed to support his/her recovery once s/he leaves campus.

Providing an alumnus with a firm foundation for his/her recovery is not only a recommendation; it’s essential. Look at it as a road map to sobriety.

A good Continuing Care Plan may encompass some of the following components:

  • Ongoing Treatment… such as Extended Care to work more deeply on co-occurring disorders or trauma while practicing recovery.
  • 12-Step Immersion… for those who would benefit from an intimate community doing an in-depth look at applying the 12-Steps of recovery.
  • 12-Step meetings… these help form the foundation of abstinence based addiction treatment. It’s an important step to find a home group and a sponsor. There are AA and NA meetings in most communities across the country. Find more information at www.aa.org or www.na.org.
  • Aftercare meetings… are an ongoing support network for alumni and their family members. The goal of Aftercare is to foster and encourage accountability, identify and arrest relapse symptoms and nurture long-term recovery. Aftercare is a FREE service provided for all former patients and family members to attend for life and is offered weekly at a several convenient Cumberland Heights locations.
  • Sober living… is recommended to an alumnus when it is felt they would benefit from additional structure following the residential program. For someone new in recovery sober living provides a sober support system while transitioning to independent living.
  • Outpatient Recovery Centers… can offer day or evening group therapy for the next step for an alumnus who began his/her recovery within an inpatient residential program. It affords a transition back to the home and work environment while still being supported in early recovery practices.
  • Meeting with a psychiatrist and/or therapist who is informed about addiction… this gives an alumnus a clinician to speak to in a confidential environment and a platform to work through issues such as trauma. Additionally, a psychiatrist will understand mental health and various therapy and pharmacology options for each condition.
  • Wellness checkups with a primary care physician… to ensure an alumnus doesn’t have an undiagnosed medical condition for which s/he needs treatment. Also, to maintain communication between the alumnus and his/her physician where medication may be of concern.
  • Alumni Activities… connect and have fun in recovery. As you continue your recovery process, Alumni services may be provided where you’ve completed treatment. Participation is encouraged in the wide range of activities and events offered in a safe and friendly recovery environment.

I cannot say enough about how critical a Continuing Care Plan is to a person’s overall outcome. Following the specific steps of a Continuing Care Plan ensures a greater degree of success in long-term recovery. With a road map in hand, each alumnus bravely begins recovery, taking the recommendations and each of the 12 steps, one at a time…one day at a time.


Components of a Continuing Care Plan | Blog Author Katrina CornwellKatrina Cornwell is a case manager at Cumberland Heights, a motivational speaker, blogger and three-time, first-place award winner in the annual Tennessee Press Association contest.

In her presentations, she speaks about her addiction to drugs and alcohol and how those habits led to a drunk driving accident which killed a man in October 2009.

Blog article: Eclipse at Cumberland HeightsI’ve just come down from the big slope and hill at the front of Cumberland Heights after watching the Eclipse. Along with everybody else, we’ve all been talking about it for weeks. The science, the mystery, the spirituality of it all. Metaphors abound.

At the simplest, the Eclipse shows how active addiction gradually shuts out everything else in our lives until the Moment of Totality–Step One. When everything is blotted out and we can no longer see our way backwards or forwards, we finally surrender. We finally admit that we cannot control our alcohol and drug use—that we are powerless and that our lives are unmanageable. We admit that addiction is killing us. Like the Earth and all that is on it, we cannot live without the Sun, or in our case, what the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous calls, “the Sunlight of the Spirit.”

What struck me on the hill was the beauty of that Step One surrender moment.  Patients, alumni, staff, and their families were scattered across the hill. As I looked around at the moment of Total Eclipse, I saw a couple of stars and a planet that couldn’t be seen until the darkness was more complete. You know, those people you take for granted when you really sick and who are still standing by you when you finally ask for help.  I saw sunset colors of gold and soft orange from all four sides—’a 360-degree sunset,’ as my friend Claude called it. The view I see every day suddenly seemed precious in a way I often miss—just like my family, my friends, and the other truly important stuff I ignored in active addiction.

I did not feel the beauty of my first Step One surrender. I was too defeated, too scared, and too unsure that there was anything on the other side. I didn’t know about Step Two and Step Three—how a Higher Power working through a fellowship of other recovering people would save me. It took time for me to see the beauty and the freedom of the Step One surrender. It took time for me to understand that Step One was the beginning of a new life for me.

As the Totality happened today, there was a spontaneous cheering from all across the slope and hill at Cumberland Heights! It wasn’t planned; it just came from deep inside us.  It was the sound of sober and clean people celebrating. “We admitted that we were powerless over alcohol and drugs-that our lives had become unmanageable.” And, in that very moment, the Sun started to come back out.


Cinde Stewart Freeman is Cumberland Heights’ Chief Clinical Officer and has been with Cumberland Heights for 25 years. During her tenure Cinde has served in nursing, clinical management and administrative roles.

Cinde is a bachelor’s prepared nurse with a master’s degree in counseling. She served on the Board of Directors at both AWARE and Thistle Farms. Cinde has developed and presented professional trainings on a wide variety of clinical skills, as well as process improvement, clinical supervision, and workplace wellness. She is an Oral Examiner for the Tennessee Board of Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors and a Qualified Clinical Supervisor for the LADAC.

 

Blog Article Courage in Recovery - written by Angela Moscheo Benson, MDiv, MA, Spiritual DirectorPoet E.E. Cummings once wrote, “To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else – means to fight the hardest battle any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.” I have that quote hanging by my desk. It reminds me why I do what I do for myself and for others and of the courage it takes to work for both.

Every day the world sends messages to our egos telling us who and what we are. These messages also dictate who and what we should want to be, constantly encouraging us to compare ourselves to others. This message sending world is a human construct, material and subjective. It is not a spiritual message of love and tolerance. It’s no wonder we in recovery can feel so out of place in this world, especially in early recovery. Our program tells us a spirit of love and tolerance is our creed and yet our world tells our egos that an attitude of proud judgement and comparison is our way. The message sending world is selfish and wrong. It’s also a willing participant in the disease of addiction.

The disease of addiction could not thrive without the support of social human constructs. And yet, instead of promoting clean living, everywhere we look social media, TV, movies, music, drugs and alcohol are glorified and their use is commonplace. Those who choose not to use, and those in recovery, are considered square and dull by popular culture. And those in early recovery fear that message is true. I talk to patients everyday who worry about what will happen when they get out of treatment. With whom will they spend time? What will they do for fun if they aren’t drinking and drugging? Do they really need a recovery community instead of their old friend? These are legitimate concerns propagated by a culture of indulgence and instant gratification. So, how do those of us in the treatment field combat such strong messages?

For me, the key to success in recovery lies in Step 11. It’s written on page 98 of the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, “There is a direct linkage among self-examination, meditation and prayer. Taken separately, these practices can bring much relief and benefit. But when they are logically related and interwoven, the result in an unshakable foundation for life.” Those are simple instructions that also happen to be difficult to carry out. In order to practice the concepts of 12-Step recovery, one must be made aware of the spiritual principles. On the common list of spiritual principles, courage is named for Step 4, and where I agree with that principle for that Step, I also believe courage is the primary principle required for all of the Steps (and for most anything else in life). It takes great courage to admit we are powerless.

It takes even more courage to ask for help and to believe a Power greater than ourselves is the bedrock on which 12-Step recovery is based.

Yes, it takes courage and at least a sliver of faith and a dash of hope to begin this program, but it also takes courage to speak the truth, to set boundaries and to self-advocate. Once we become aware that addiction is a disease, we must come to accept that diagnosis applies to us. Then and only then can we begin the important actions required for a “personality change sufficient to bring about recovery…Most emphatically [I] wish to say that any alcoholic capable of honestly facing his problems… can recover, provided he does not close his mind to all spiritual concepts… Willingness, honesty and open-mindedness [and courage] are the essentials for recovery.” (AA p. 567 and 568)


Angela Moscheo Benson, MDiv, MA, Spiritual DirectorAngela Moscheo Benson is a Spiritual Director at Cumberland Heights. Angela earned a Masters of Divinity at Union Theological Seminary in New York City where she lived and worked for many years before returning to her hometown of Nashville. Angela’s focus is on the spiritual principles of 12-Step recovery and her spiritual pedagogy is concept focused and experiential. 

Angela is married to her childhood sweetheart, and they share an active home with her son and their seven rescue dogs.


Dr. Anderson Spickard Jr. presents “The Craving Brain”

Please join us in the Frist Family Life Center Auditorium on the campus of Cumberland Heights for the following schedule of events:


WHAT: Dr. Anderson Spickard Jr. presents “The Craving Brain”
WHEN: September 13, 2017
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center Auditorium (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
SPEAKING: 1 PM to 3 PM – Lecture with Q&A
SIGNING: 3 PM to 4 PM – Book Signing
COST: $60 per ticket

Click Here to Register

Dr. Anderson Spickard’s book “The Craving Brain” will also be available for purchase in the Cumberland Height’s Book Shop.

Dr. Anderson Spickard, Jr., will draw on his 45 years of experience as a physician, professor and leader in the field of addiction studies to synthesize and summarize his current understanding of the cause and treatment of addiction as laid out in his most recent book, The Craving Brain: Science, Spirituality and the Road to Recovery. Impacted deeply in the early days of his practice by the death of a colleague suffering from addiction who committed suicide, Dr. Spickard has since followed a determined course to find answers. Drawing on research into the brain’s reward system, he will describe the hijacking that leads to the perfect brain injury/disorder for the development of addiction. His description of how a person gets into an addicted state and how a person gets out of it is extremely relevant for those called upon more each day to address the needs of patients, families and communities struggling to survive in a time of increasing deaths by overdose.

Dr. Anderson Spickard presents 'The Craving Brain' at Cumberland Heights

When I was discharged from Cumberland Heights I knew one thing for certain…treatment may have been complete, but recovery was just beginning. Today, there are many ways I’m active in my recovery and one of the most rewarding is what I’m able to do for others. Service work is an integral part of what keeps me sober one day at a time. Each simple act keeps me out of my own head long enough to focus on another individual or group’s recovery. I’m not seeking recognition, only trying to make someone else’s journey in sobriety a little easier. And while focusing on someone else, something magical happens…people begin to recover together.

With this in mind, here are 10 ways to be of service to others in recovery:

1) Sponsorship – Becoming a sponsor is the ultimate way one person suffering from addiction can help another. A sponsor gives his or her time; meeting sponsees to help them work the steps, to ferret out the root causes of his or her addiction, and develop a deeper relationship with a Higher Power of their understanding.

2) Be a sober contact – Newly recovering people are always encouraged to get as many phone numbers as they can so they’ll have plenty of people to call when they’re triggered to use or drink. Being the person on the other end of the call can save a life.

3) Take meetings to detox units – I’ll never forget the first message of recovery, strength and hope I heard was in a detox unit at a local hospital. Providing this vital area of service work, you can inspire hope in someone about a program with the potential to change their life for the better.

4) Chair 12-Step meetings – A certain amount of responsibility comes along with steering the ship at a 12-Step meeting. The chair passes out the readings, and often, chooses the topic of discussion. This role serves every person attending.

5) Attend business meetings – Each home group has a meeting set aside to discuss financial details: bills for rent, items needed for purchase such as soft drinks; and the collections to pay for expenses. This is a good way to serve the home group.

6) Greet people – Making someone feel welcome in a 12-Step meeting is a wonderful way to give back. Shaking hands, taking an interest in a newcomer, offering a smile or a friendly hello can be the one thing someone needed to hear to come back to another meeting.

7) Clean up – Each month my home group assigns someone to clean up our meeting place. Wiping off tables, sweeping floors and cleaning up the facility to keep it nice for our meetings is one way to get out of ourselves and help others.

8) Offer transportation to meetings – In recovery finding our way to meetings is our responsibility. However, some provide rides as service work. I was blessed enough to have someone who helped me get to meetings when I couldn’t drive.

9) Participate in fundraising – A clubhouse where I got sober recently held a yard sale. Providing clothing, tagging items or volunteering time at an event like this are all ways to provide service work.

10) Host sober activities – A common complaint among someone new in recovery is that they don’t know how to have fun without substances. Hosting an event for sober people to have a bonfire, barbecue, movie night, canoe or camping trip; or just a gathering to walk together downtown is more helpful than you might realize.


10 Ways to be of Service to Others in RecoveryKatrina Cornwell is a case manager at Cumberland Heights, a motivational speaker, blogger and three-time, first-place award winner in the annual Tennessee Press Association contest.

In her presentations, she speaks about her addiction to drugs and alcohol and how those habits led to a drunk driving accident which killed a man in October 2009.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Women

The Women’s Program at Cumberland Heights responds to the specific needs of women by keeping the patient’s relationship with herself and others at the heart of the program. We provide a safe, healing environment that is conducive to restoring these connections.

Cumberland Heights' Director of The Women's Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Director of The Women’s Program Melissa Hudgens discusses elements and actions women need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The Women’s Program addresses the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of women with addiction, empowering them to move from addiction to recovery.  Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.  The Women’s Program is up to 30 days in length and our primary program for women ages 18 and up. Studies have shown that women respond better to treatment in a gender specific setting, so at Cumberland Heights our Women’s Program offers an all-female staff and 12 Step based therapies tailored specifically to women’s issues.

Each patient receives an individual treatment plan with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Women and Sober Living program for Men.   These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

With the high incidence of trauma among women, we provide trauma screening and trauma informed care, allowing a woman to begin to heal from painful situations, as well as old wounds worsened by addiction.  If symptoms of trauma surface, we offer education, assessments, coping skills and referral for appropriate therapy. We recognize the importance of addressing the shame often related to addiction as well as issues such as body image, parenting and a loss of spirit.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others. The skills acquired during this process are essential to establishing and maintaining a healthy and happy life, free from alcohol and drugs.

In this nurturing community, a woman can begin to love herself as she learns to trust others
Because women deal with issues specific to their gender and role in society, we address body image, healthy relationships and parenting.

Women’s First Step Program

Many potential patients who need residential care have circumstances such as financial, vocational and/or familial responsibilities that may dictate a shorter length of stay. Cumberland Heights’ First Step Program offers a customized program that stabilizes, educates and prepares patients for the next level of care. This program has a variable length of stay and works with the patient’s health insurance provider in preparing the patient’s transition to an outpatient treatment program in their community.

Women’s Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for women who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps women identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.




Alcohol & Drug Addiction – Adult Men’s Recovery Services

Cumberland Heights' Men's Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol WATCH VIDEO
Cumberland Heights’ Men’s Program Clinical Coordinator Brandon Antoskow discusses elements and actions men need to take in their recovery from drugs and alcohol.

When Cumberland Heights opened its doors in 1966, our Men’s Program was among the first of its kind providing men a new and rewarding life in recovery from addiction. Each program is gender specific and follows the fundamental teachings of the 12 Steps of recovery.

Through our 50+ years treating patients, we’ve found men often struggle the most with societal pressures that make it difficult for them to express their feelings or make them feel pressured to obtain a specific level of success.  The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.  In most cases,  the men’s program is up to 30 days in length and the primary program for men ages 18 and up. For those who require additional support, we also offer an Extended Care Program for men-only, up to 180 days in length, to assist those who desire a safe transitional program back into everyday life.  In addition in 2017 we opened our very first Sober Living program for Men and Sober Living program for Women. These offsite Sober Living facilities are structured, safe and substance-free living environments for individuals just beginning or returning to recovery.

We tailor an individual plan for each patient, with lifelong recovery as the primary objective. Our experienced staff implements a comprehensive education on the disease of addiction and an understanding of the obstacles to recovery through group and individual therapy, 12 Step meetings, and family therapy.

From a patient’s first assessment, through residential treatment, and all the way to their first aftercare group, newly recovering men are provided the necessary resources for a sober, productive and fulfilling life.  As part of the recovery community, men begin to break down the barriers addiction and stereotypes have built up.  As men learn intimately about the disease of addiction, they begin to normalize their feelings and experiences.

At Cumberland Heights, our goal is to help men turn the hard work of getting clean and sober into a lifetime of happiness and contentment.

Men’s First Step Program

The First Step Program is a combination of a residential stay for detoxification and stabilization as needed, followed by Intensive Outpatient treatment for three hours, four times/week to assist the patient in learning and establishing recovery skills. Length of stay in the residential and intensive outpatient components varies based upon clinical needs and outside support systems. The patient’s treatment team works to determine an individual recommendation for each patient. Family education groups are offered in both program components. Cumberland Heights contracts with a variety of insurance providers. Our staff can assist you and your family in estimating insurance benefits and out of pocket costs.

Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery for Adult Men
The Men’s Program is designed to assist men in moving from the pain and isolation of the active addiction to a connected recovery lifestyle.

Relapse Track

Cumberland Heights’ Relapse Track is for men who have suffered relapse after maintaining some period of recovery from addiction. It offers a specialized process guided by a trained counselor to allow discovery of what contributed to the relapse. Specific obstacles to an individual’s recovery are identified, as well as examination of the underlying issues contributing to the relapse process. These issues may include past or present dysfunction in the family, childhood abuse, abandonment or other trauma.

Additionally, this track helps men identify individual relapse warning signs and learn specific skills to aid in preventing additional relapses. If needed, time is spent understanding substitute behavioral addictions that contribute to post-treatment relapses.

Recovery Care Advocacy

Alcohol and drug addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. Studies have shown accountability with a continuing care plan, sober fellowship, family involvement and extended support serve as the cornerstone for long-term recovery. Recovery Care Advocacy at Cumberland Heights is a service provided to all our alumni through their first year of recovery after completing a treatment program at Cumberland Heights.

The Men’s Extended Care Community

The Men’s Extended Care Community is based on a 60 – 120 day residential stay. This program, which mirrors primary treatment in the Traditional Men’s Program or other similar program, helps you identify and address core psychological issues that may sabotage ongoing recovery. It also allows you to practice a daily recovery program in a supportive setting that’s less restrictive than primary care. Men come to the main campus every day for treatment activities and share transitional housing located one mile from the main campus. Active attendance and participation in the local 12-Step community creates a bridge between treatment and recovery community environments.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are honored to be of service to you and your loved one. We understand that this is a sensitive time and we congratulate you for taking the first step into recovery by reaching out for help. Below are some of the most frequently asked questions for your reference.









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