8 Signs Your Teen May Be at Risk for Developing An Addiction

8 Signs Your Teen May Be at Risk for Developing An Addiction

By: Cumberland Heights

8 Signs Your Teen May Be at Risk for Developing An Addiction

Teenage years present a certain period of vulnerability, especially as youth are navigating their way into adulthood. Peer pressure is high during this time, and many teens want to experiment – even if you’ve already had “the talk” with your teen about abusing substances, how do you know what is most likely to put them at risk for using anyways? The reality is that having a conversation with your teen is a huge plus, but there may be other areas of their life that are turning them towards drinking and drugs. By knowing some of the warning signs beforehand, you may be able to take some additional steps as a parent – to better lessen risk and point them on a path towards happiness and health.

Earlier this year, researchers wanted to explore what factors could make adolescents most at risk for alcoholism later on – and they found that these risks are very early, indeed. The way a child is raised can have a significant impact on the way they view themselves, others and the world around them at large. A number of family-related issues could actually lend themselves to a teens’ substance abuse later on:

  • Growing up in a family where the parents do not get along well
  • Father-son conflicts
  • Poor quality between parent and child interactions
  • Having a parent(s) with alcoholism or drug dependence of some sort

Of course, parenting is only one aspect of it all – your teen’s personality/behavioral tendencies, on the other hand, could cause them to be more vulnerable to substance use:

  • Their genetics (does alcoholism/addiction run in the family?)
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Angry or anxious temperament
  • Depression

Teens who abuse substances early on in life are more likely than others to develop a dependence and addiction later on. Even at this phase of life, healthy coping skills don’t always come naturally – in fact, teens may even replicate what they’ve seen their parents or friends do when they’re upset or ready to relax. If you believe your adolescent may be abusing substances, it’s time to seek help. For a period of time, your teen can gain invaluable access to support, tools and resources which could give them the stability and structure they need to overcome their addiction.

The earlier your teen seeks help, the better. Don’t wait any longer to ensure they get on the road to recovery.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998. 

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