Original Article: Green Hills News, Staff Writer, David Smith – February 22, 2017

Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
Beloved Long-Haul Driver Bequeaths Home to Cumberland Heights Addiction Treatment Center
A retired bus operator let it be know that upon his death he wanted to donate his home.

But Timothy Cotton, a retired bus operator who drove for major country music stars Tim McGraw, Conway Twitty, Alan Jackson, Kathy Mattea and the country music group Lonestar, also had a more pointed message: he wanted the success he achieved in life to be a tool for people needing help.

The home at Setliff Place in East Nashville sold this January generating $285,000, all of which was donated to Cumberland Heights, an addiction treatment center.

“This home holds a special place in our heart,” said Mallory Gibson, who, along with her husband, purchased the home. “Our family also lives on Setliff Place and we will now be able to raise our children within walking distance of each other. Tim was deeply committed to his family and his community, and we look forward to honoring that legacy in this beautiful home.”

Following the transaction, Cumberland Heights announced the creation of the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance. The fund is part of Cumberland Heights’ endowment and will provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford treatment or do not have insurance to cover costs.

Cotton was himself a patient on a MusiCares scholarship.

“Tim Cotton was a generous soul who loved caring for others,” said Jay Crosson, chief executive officer at Cumberland Heights. “His incredible donation and the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance will help many, many people recover their life from drug and alcohol addiction. Tim’s memory will live on at Cumberland Heights in perpetuity.”

Cotton was renowned for his ability to make friends. He touched so many people in the Nashville recovery community that they organized aftercare meetings in his hospital room so he did not have to miss meetings.

After his death, Cotton’s sister Cathy Reisch, received numerous calls from former Cumberland Heights’ patients who had met Tim Cotton during treatment and were touched enough to call with condolences.

“The Cotton family is grateful to Bill Branch and Life Style Real Estate Advisors. Bill did more than donate his commission – he put his heart into this task, was very supportive to our entire family and dedicated a lot of time to make this sale happen for all the parties involved,” said Reisch.

Bill Branch of Life Style Real Estate Advisors served as broker and donated his commission because proceeds were being donated to Cumberland Heights.

Branch describes the experience as follows: “Tim Cotton loved his family, his home, and his neighborhood.”

Having worked with Cumberland Heights on several other real estate transactions to support their mission, it was immediately apparent to me that this was a very special situation. After meeting Tim’s sister Cathy Reisch for the first time, I wanted to be a part of helping to make Tim’s dreams and wishes for his home come true. We had two goals from the start: to raise as much money for Tim’s endowment to Cumberland Heights as possible through the sale of his home, and do as much as possible to find new stewards for the property that would love the home and the neighborhood as much as Tim did. On both counts, we succeeded beyond our hopes, and there will be many people benefiting from Tim’s beautiful heart and enormous generosity for years to come.”

Cotton was the 1991 Honoree for the Mary Catherine Strobel Award as Volunteer of the Year from Nashville CARES and trained HIV/AIDS volunteer.

Beloved long-time driver for music acts willed East Nashville home to Cumberland Heights

cumberland-heights-sets-up-the-timothy-cotton-fund-for-patient-assistance
Timothy Cotton

Cumberland Heights announces the creation of the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance that was made possible by sale of Tim Cotton’s home on Setliff Place in East Nashville.

Cotton was a former Cumberland Heights patient and long-time driver for many musical acts, including Tim McGraw, Alan Jackson, Lonestar, Kathy Mattea and Conway Twitty.

Cotton passed away in January 2016 and willed his Setliff Place home to Cumberland Heights. The home sold in January 2017. In total, the sale of Cotton’s home generated $285,000, all of which was donated to the fund.

“Tim Cotton was a generous soul who loved caring for others,” said Jay Crosson, chief executive officer at Cumberland Heights. “His incredible donation and the Timothy Cotton Fund for Patient Assistance will help many, many people recover life from drug and alcohol addiction. Tim’s memory will live on at Cumberland Heights in perpetuity.”

The fund is part of Cumberland Heights’ endowment and will provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford treatment or do not have insurance that covers costs. Cotton was himself a patient on a MusiCares scholarship, so his gift back is especially meaningful.

“This home holds a special place in our heart,” said Mallory Gibson, who purchased this home with her husband. “Our family also lives on Setliff Place and we will now be able to raise our children within walking distance of each other. Tim was deeply committed to his family and his community, and we look forward to honoring that legacy in this beautiful home.”

Cotton was renowned for his ability to make friends. He touched so many people in the Nashville recovery community that they organized aftercare meetings in his hospital room so he did not have to miss meetings. After his death, Cotton’s sister Cathy Reisch received numerous calls from former Cumberland Heights’ patients who had met Tim during treatment and were touched enough to call with condolences.

Cotton was the 1991 Honoree for the Mary Catherine Strobel Award as Volunteer of the Year from Nashville CARES and trained HIV/AIDS volunteer.

Bill Branch of Life Style Real Estate Advisors served as broker donated his commission because proceeds were being donated to Cumberland Heights.

Branch describes the experience as follows: “Tim Cotton loved his family, his home, and his neighborhood. Having worked with Cumberland Heights on several other real estate transactions to support their mission, it was immediately apparent to me that this was a very special situation. After meeting Tim’s sister Cathy Reisch for the first time, I wanted to be a part of helping to make Tim’s dreams and wishes for his home come true. We had two goals from the start; 1) to raise as much money for Tim’s endowment to Cumberland Heights as possible through the sale of his home, and 2) do as much as possible to find new stewards for the property that would love the home and the neighborhood as much as Tim did. On both counts, we succeeded beyond our hopes, and there will be many people benefiting from Tim’s beautiful heart and enormous generosity for years to come.”

Cathy Reisch, said, “The Cotton family is grateful to Bill Branch and Life Style Real Estate Advisors. Bill did more than donate his commission – he put his heart into this task, was very supportive to our entire family and dedicated a lot of time to make this sale happen for all the parties involved.”

By: Mary Beth McCauley, Staff Writer at University of Tennessee Daily Beacon Feb 9, 2017 — Updated Feb 13, 2017

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour

Knoxville (Tennessee) had the chance to get up close and personal with Justin Furstenfeld, the lead vocalist of alternative rock group Blue October, at the Square Room in Market Square this past Wednesday.

People can change: Justin Furstenfeld's unique approach to his book tour
People can change: Justin Furstenfeld’s (of Blue October) unique approach to his book tour and his story of recovery

Furstenfeld has been traveling to cities across the country to promote his book, “Crazy Making: The Words and Lyrics of Justin Furstenfeld to the Music of Blue October.” The “Open Book Tour” also gives Furstenfeld the opportunity to share stories regarding his struggle with addiction, depression and relationships along with playing an acoustic set in front of a small, intimate audience.

He kicked off the evening with “The Answer,” the title track of Blue October’s first album, and began to tell the audience about his own personal journey, starting with his teenage years. Furstenfeld led his first band called The Last Wish at only 15 years old, the age that he was officially diagnosed with depression. When the Last Wish split up, Furstenfeld went on to create Blue October.

Although Furstenfeld was raw and honest with the crowd, he told his stories with such charisma and humor that throughout the heartfelt details we were all laughing and smiling. He often reminded the crowd, “This is the open book tour. No holding back.” The auditorium felt like a room full of friends, a safe space to share their darkest secrets.

Furstenfeld played a few other songs from Blue October’s debut album, such as “Black Orchid” and “Breakfast After 10.” In these, the audience learned of his first love, Mamie, and how he forgot her birthday after two years of dating. His belated birthday song to her was “Calling You,” the song that scored Blue October a record deal.

He told the audience about his band’s first 15-passenger tour van — and their second one, and their third. He walked us down the path that began his drug addiction, partying on tour every night in hotel rooms and bars. During this same time, Furstenfeld met his first wife and had his first child, a baby girl named Blue, and that changed everything for him. The audience sat quietly absorbing every detail and feeling every emotion as he told his story.

He bravely shared the details of his divorce, the custody battle for his daughter and his spiral back into addiction. And, through all of these hardships, he continued to make music.

Furstenfeld pieced together all of the major events in his life one by one and sang us the songs that stemmed from those events, making them even more meaningful and emotional for the audience, many of which were already huge fans of Blue October.

Towards the end of the evening, Furstenfeld shared his redemption story. He went through a 75-day program at Cumberland Heights, a rehabilitation center in Nashville, and found his faith there. He has been sober for four years now. The audience cried, clapped and cheered for him, all rising to their feet in applause. Furstenfeld truly was an open book, and told his story bravely without shame, but with hope.

After the show, Furstenfeld took time to meet his fans, shaking hands and signing posters, all with a smile on his face. His merchandise sports the phrase “People Can Change,” the perfect summary of his journey thus far.

CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS TO OPEN
SECOND SOBER-LIVING HOME IN FOUR MONTHS

NASHVILLE, TENN. – Jan. 10, 2017 – Cumberland Heights will open a sober-living home for adult men this month, its second sober-living home opened in the last four months.

By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.
By adding sober living to residential, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.

The Keep It Simple! House opens on January 16, will serve up to eight male clients at a time. Clients will stay a minimum of three months and must have completed a primary treatment program. Keep It Simple! joins Searchlight Sober Living for women opened in late October 2016.

 

Cumberland Heights sober living creates the right environment during the critical initial two-year period of recovery,” said Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson. “By adding sober living to residential inpatient, outpatient, and 12-step immersion programs called Still Waters, we now offer the complete support package so our patients can transition properly from treatment back to their lives.”

 

Sober living allows residents to maintain contact with outpatient services and aftercare while integrating school, work and community responsibilities.

 

While other recovery residences exist, there has been a gap between the very high end providing many services resembling treatment and the very low end which is affordable but offers no services and often has high turnover,” said Executive Director for Community-Based Services Randal Lea. “Cumberland has secured safe housing at affordable rates in established neighborhoods.”

 

Cumberland Heights’ sober homes operate on a “social model” where residents share responsibility and accountability, which fosters greater independence from treatment or authority figures. The male residence is in Murfreesboro and the female residence is in Gallatin.

 

Partners include the Tennessee Alliance of Recovery Residences and National Alliance of Recovery Residences, both of which promote nationally recognized standards for safety and a quality recovery environment.

 


 

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a nonprofit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding in 1966.


NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The alleged leader of a Honduran drug group has been arrested in Nashville.

Officials with Metro Nashville Police said in a Tweet Tuesday morning that Victor Cardoza Martinez was taken into custody at an apartment on Nolensville Pike.

Check out Cumberland Heights’ own Dr. Chapman Sledge discussing the local heroin epidemic and Honduran drug leader’s arrest with News Channel 4.

According to investigators, Martinez is the group’s suspected leader. Police also seized heroin, cocaine and cash in the raid.

February 25, 2016 – A small seed planted over a year ago has grown to fruition with the opening of an outpatient drug rehabilitation facility in Cumberland County. The latest effort to address the rising addiction epidemic is the result of a cooperative effort involving many community agencies and leaders.

 

Cabin in the Woods: Cumberland Heights opens outpatient facility
Cabin in the Woods: Cumberland Heights opens outpatient facility in Crossville, TN
Tuesday an open house was held at Cumberland Good Samaritans (CGS) located off Tenth St. with an overflow crowd gathered to get a first glimpse of “the cabin in the woods” that will serve as Cumberland Heights’ outpatient facility.

 
“There is a big need to address drug and alcohol addiction issues in our community,” CGS Director Mickey Eldridge told the gathering that included persons from law enforcement, social action agencies, citizen volunteer groups and professionals in the field who deal with the issue.

 
“Folks within the community need services and assistances and it became a goal to grow some intervention services,” Eldridge said.

 
CGS board member Steve Stone first brought the need for an outpatient facility to discussion, asking Eldridge what CGS could do to see this happen. He contacted Cumberland Heights whose representatives were receptive to the idea of opening a facility in Crossville.

 
The CGS board then decided to donate use of a cabin it had purchased when it became available and after renovations were done, Cumberland Heights appointed Jerry Baryer to oversee the Cumberland County facility.

 
Cumberland Heights has a long and respected national reputation in the field of alcohol and drug addiction. It was founded by Robert Crichton Sr. and Dr. Thomas Frist Sr. with the mission to “transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol and drug addiction.”

 
That mission incorporates the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous with the therapeutic tools necessary to live productive, sober lives.


Cumberland Heights board members and staff hold commemorative coins to celebrate Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary.
Cumberland Heights board members and staff hold commemorative coins to celebrate Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary.

Drug and alcohol rehabilitation center Cumberland Heights has had a longstanding relationship with the Nashville music industry. However, the non-profit organization has never had a facility on Music Row. That will change in May when Cumberland Heights opens its first Music Row intensive outpatient facility (IOP), to be located at 1619 17th Ave. South.

The IOP treatment program is designed for individuals who have completed or do not require medically-supervised detoxification.

Cumberland Heights also offers a professional musicians track, which combines traditional treatment with specialized components geared toward professional musicians. Musicians learn how the disease effects their profession, and how to surround themselves with a support system for recovery. The Music Row IOP will also be available to work with people who live and work near Music Row. This includes the collegiate recovery community as well as the many business people working downtown who would find this IOP convenient to them in their recovery.

The opening will mean a total of 10 locations available to help communities in Tennessee. Cumberland Heights has IOP facilities in Chattanooga, Cool Springs, Crossville, Hermitage/Old Hickory, Jackson, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Sumner County (Gallatin), in Nashville on River Road and soon Music Row.

PeytonHoge photos-006 copyAdditionally, Cumberland Heights will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year.

“We are honored and proud to have been a trusted provider of alcohol and drug addiction treatment for five decades,” said Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights. “Fifty years of experience brings us so many positive examples of helping patients and their families – we hope to be able to share some of these with the community throughout the year.”

During a celebration party, staff and board members received 50th anniversary commemorative coins modeled after “sober coins” that are used during recovery.

NASHVILLE, TENN. – (November 12, 2015) – Cumberland Heights drug and alcohol rehabilitation center has launched a new advertising campaign with the theme of “Recover Life.”

The first part of the campaign features staff living lives in recovery. In the ad, the staff members hold up a Cumberland Heights sober coin while saying how many years they have been in recovery. Sober coins are common symbols of years living in recovery.

Helping someone recover their life from the grips of addiction is the most important benefit we provide our patients – and their families,” said Martha Farabee, chief development and marketing officer. “We wanted the campaign to reflect our success and our expertise in helping people live a life free from drugs and alcohol. With many of our staff members living successfully in recovery, they are role models for patients and able to build trust that is crucial for the recovery process.”

Farabee said the integrated marketing campaign targets primarily the families of those struggling with addiction, as well as targeting the patient.

“Cumberland Heights includes patients’ families in the process because success depends on a strong support system once they leave our facilities,” said Farabee.

Future ads in this campaign will feature alumni and alumni families. The Cumberland Heights alumni association has more than 10,000 members in the Nashville area.

We’re proud to have served Nashville for nearly 50 years,” said Jay Crosson, CEO of Cumberland Heights. “Having been a trusted member of the community for so long, our best source of referrals is from our many alumni – or friends and family of our alumni. Next year will be Cumberland Heights’ 50th anniversary and this new campaign is the beginning of that recognition.”

One of the campaign’s consistent visuals is a coin noting the 50th anniversary. This coin is modeled after the concept of sober coins.

The ads will placed on television, billboards, radio, in print and on various digital channels in middle Tennessee.

About Cumberland Heights

Cumberland Heights’ mission is to transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol or drug addiction. As a non-profit organization, Cumberland Heights is committed to the approximately 2,500 men, women and adolescents it serves every year and the communities where its facilities are located. The organization has followed the teachings of the 12 Steps since its founding.


RECOVER LIFE TELEVISION ADS




RECOVER LIFE PRINT ADS

Jamie J.
I recovered life 7 years ago.

Porter A.
I recovered life 3 years ago.

cumberland-heights-nashville-treatment-revover-life-ads-jaime cumberland-heights-nashville-treatment-revover-life-ads-porter

Montgomery Gentry and Special Guest Aaron Lewis Perform
to Benefit Cumberland Heights

Popular Fundraising Concert Scheduled at Historic Ryman Auditorium

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – August 26, 2015 – On Wednesday, October 21, the Concert for Cumberland Heights will feature country music stars Montgomery Gentry with special guest Aaron Lewis at the historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland Heights.

“Alcohol and drug addiction affects our entire community,” said Troy Gentry. “We are excited to help Cumberland Heights support young people suffering from this disease.”

On Wednesday, October 21, the Concert for Cumberland Heights will feature country music stars Montgomery Gentry with special guest Aaron Lewis at the historic Ryman Auditorium to benefit the John Hiatt Fund for Adolescent and Young Adult Treatment at Cumberland HeightsProceeds of the event support Cumberland Heights’ adolescent and young adult treatment programs. With a treatment plan based in the 12 Steps, these programs help patients set goals for recovery while helping them process life’s consequences and unmanageability.

“We look forward to this concert every year,” said Cumberland Heights’ CEO Jay Crosson. “The money raised is so important to us in supporting our mission – plus, it’s fun for everyone involved. We are grateful to the artists and sponsors who make it all possible.”

Tickets for the concert are on sale now via Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com, the Ryman box office, ryman.com and by phone 800.745.3000. Tickets are $49.50, $42.50 and $32.50.

Since 1966, Cumberland Heights has been the proven experts in alcohol and drug addiction treatment. They provide quality care, based on the foundations of the 12 Steps, to individuals and their families suffering from addiction. Cumberland Heights is a private, nonprofit organization located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee.

About Montgomery Gentry

With over 20 plus charted singles, the Kentucky-born duo just celebrated a major career milestone as Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry were recently inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame. On June 9, the pair released Folks Like Us, their eighth studio album and first with label partner Blaster Records.

Montgomery Gentry has earned countless CMA, ACM, and GRAMMY awards and nominations with undeniable blue collar anthems like “Hell Yeah,” “My Town,” and “Hillbilly Shoes.” They’ve notched five #1 singles (“If You Ever Stop Loving Me,” “Something To Be Proud Of,” “Lucky Man,” “Back When I Knew It All” and “Roll With Me”) and will soon celebrate their sixth anniversary as Grand Ole Opry members. For more about Montgomery Gentry, visit www.montgomerygentry.com, engage with Troy and Eddie on Facebook, @mgunderground on twitter, and check out their YouTube channel.

About Aaron Lewis

Aaron Lewis has often been called one of the most versatile artists around. He has written and played everything from metal to traditional country. He was the lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist, and founding member of the rock group Staind. After seven albums he ventured into country music with his debut solo EP, Town Line, which included his first single, “Country Boy.” He followed it up with the LP, The Road, with “Endless Summer” which also made the country charts.

Media Contacts:
Merrill Derrick Amy A. Atkinson
Marketing and Public Relations Manager Amy Atkinson Communications
615.432.3226 615.305.8118
merrill_derrick@cumberlandheights.org Amy@AmyACommunications.com

Join us for out 6th Annual Alumni Reunion & BBQ Picnic and a day of alumni fellowship, great bbq food, family fun, awesome recovery music and a special guest speaker! The past 5 years have been a great success and we anticipate an even better event this year, but need your participation to assure its success. Please plan to bring the family (inc. dogs on a leash) to Still Waters for a fun day, renew old friendships, make new ones and help insure that as it says in the book Alcoholics Anonymous on page 132, “we absolutely insist on enjoying life”.

Alumni-Picnic-2015

Recovery is Possible

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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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