Tag Archives: substance abuse

Tag Archives: substance abuse


Recognizing the early stages of dependency

Our society has created such blurred lines regarding what “counts” as addiction and what doesn’t, and for many people, the line of dependency is crossed without concern because it’s what “everyone else is doing”. The people we spend our time with tend to normalize certain behaviors for us, and if drinking or using drugs becomes added to the mix, we may find that we’re using more often – and developing a dependence to the substance – without even realizing it. Whether you’re concerned about yourself or a loved one, recognizing the symptoms of early stage dependency can give you a fighting chance of seeking help before a full-blown addiction develops.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explains that dependence is quite different from addiction in that dependence primarily constitutes only the body’s adaptation to the drug, requiring the person to consume more of it in order to achieve a certain effect. When a person is in the beginning stages of dependency, they’re going to start increasing their substance use over time. This will lead to the following:

  • The person will start to need more and more of the substance in order to achieve the desired effect that intrigued them to begin with
  • A person may drink or use drugs a bit more than they originally intended – or they may stay out longer or continue to use substances even after a night out with friends has ended
  • If the substance of choice isn’t taken for a decent period of time, withdrawal symptoms may start to appear, such as: headaches, insomnia, irritability, nausea, loss of appetite, fatigue and more
  • As dependency develops, a person may have less and less of an interest in engaging in hobbies they used to enjoy – because they’d rather center their focus of attention on using

Addiction eventually develops once a person has continued abusing substances, despite their harmful consequences it’s causing to their home life, relationships, school performance, work projects and more. If you or a loved one are ready to beat addiction at the dependency stage, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights.

Cumberland Heights in Crossville Tennessee is a 12-Step based outpatient alcohol and drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals age 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. If you’re ready to seek help today, call us at 931-250-5200.

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Join us for a discuss on identifying the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders and their effects on the selection and design of measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in treatment contexts and psychology.

Event Details:

WHO: Nick Hayes PhD, LMFTA, LCDC
WHAT: Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment
WHEN: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center Auditorium (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
COST: $15 – Open to the public, FREE for CH Employees!
CONTACT HOURS: 3

REGISTER NOW

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to demonstrate an overall understanding of the historical context that supports current measurement practices in treatment contexts.
  2. Participants will be able to identify the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders.
  3. Participants will be able to select and design their own measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in psychology.

About the Presenter:

Nick Hayes holds dual licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist-Associate (LMFTA-TX) as well as a Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC-TX). He has advanced training in quantitative methods, neuro-analysis and systems theory. Hayes received his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from the Department of Community, Family, and Addiction Sciences at Texas Tech University, where he served as a student member in university’s Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities for the past eight years. He has also worked with the Cumberland Heights Foundation for the past year while finishing his PhD degree.

Getting the best sleep in addiction recoveryA topic that often doesn’t get discussed, sleep is an incredibly important part of recovery from addiction. When addiction is active, we often lose vital sleep because our mind and body are reacting to chemicals they’ve acquired from substance abuse. Late at night, for example, is a common period where substance abuse takes place – and as a person becomes accustomed to this, they may find that even in the nighttime hours of recovery, they’re wide awake. A 2018 study published in the journal Addictive Behaviors concluded that worse sleep quality predicts higher levels of drug cravings, with daily drug cravings also having a negative effect on the quality of a person’s sleep. They truly go hand-in-hand, and if we can get a good grip on cravings and sleep quality, we’ll be much more adept to rest well for maximum restoration.

How Sleep is Impacted by Drugs

In 2017, researchers conducted a study which assessed the sleeping patterns of those in residential treatment centers for addiction. They found that sleep cycles – along with sleep waves – are shaped by rituals and routines; the good news, however, is that a person’s sleep cycle is bound to become more stabilized the longer a person is in recovery. Mark Grant, a psychologist with over 20 years of experience treating those who struggle with pain and stress, emphasized on his website, Overcoming Pain, explains that restful sleep serves many functions:

  • Produces serotonin and other mood-balancing chemicals in the brain
  • Produces growth hormones and others that are necessary for our physical health
  • Impacts immune functioning
  • Memory consolidation and learning takes place

When recovery from addiction is sought, a lot of these benefits are already negatively affected, and it takes time to restore some of what was lost when addiction was active. The Sleep Help Institute breaks down several classes of drugs and explains how each of them affect sleep:

Stimulants – drugs like cocaine affect the brain’s limbic system, which regulates motivation and pleasure. Stimulants increase wakefulness, which affects REM sleep (a crucial part of sleep that affects memory consolidation, mood and more)

Hallucinogens – these drugs impact a person’s perceptions and can create delusions or hallucinations in people. Ultimately, serotonin is affected (a chemical that regulates sleep and other major body functions), and persistent sleep disturbances tend to occur

Depressants – while most people believe that substances like alcohol help them to sleep, it actually disrupts sleep by worsening insomnia and altering a person’s sleep quality

Opioids – highly recognized for disrupting sleep, opioids block a person’s access to REM sleep and even deeper restorative stages of non-REM sleep

One person shared her story of addiction and how it affected her sleep via Kelly Brogan, MD. She stated:

“…As little as I slept, I was holding onto Ambien for dear life. The occasional good nights of sleep reinforced my belief that the only reason I even slept was because this pill helped me…”

Restoring Sleep During Recovery

The process of healing reminds us that good sleep isn’t a luxury, it’s a necessity – and we can best improve our capacity for sleep by taking good care of our physical, mental and spiritual health. Tuck, a website that aims to provide quality information on sleep hygiene, health and wellness, explains that there are a number of steps that can be taken to improve a person’s quality of sleep over time in recovery:

  • Reach out to others – rely on your support team in recovery when you’re having bad days so that you can effectively work through them
  • Try cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) – this approach helps people change negative, unproductive thought patterns into newer, healthier ones; if we’re able to work through some of the issues we’re going through using tools such as CBT, we may sleep better at night because we won’t have as much on our mind
  • Improve sleep hygiene – take a warm shower before bed, meditate, exercise, drink plenty of water, eat healthy food and more
  • Turn your bedroom into a room that’s conducive for good sleep – get soothing aromas, comfortable bed sheets and make sure your room stays clean for optimal mental health and sleep benefits
  • Follow a regular sleeping schedule – this will help train your mind and body to prepare for sleep at a certain time, rather than keeping your body at a fluctuating schedule
  • Get lots of natural light – artificial lighting can disrupt the body’s natural sleeping rhythm, whereas natural lighting (such as opening the blinds or even trying bright light therapy) can greatly help your body regain stabilization
  • Watch your diet and exercise – exercise lets out excess energy that may be pent up throughout the day, and healthy foods promote both better mood and sleep

It Does Get Better

Improved sleep quality may take some time, but it will improve if you don’t give up. Addiction recovery improves not only sleep, but many other areas of your life – if you’re ready to start working towards your mental, physical and spiritual wellbeing, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. It does get better.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Boy healing in addiction recoveryOur adolescent years are often such a confusing time as our mind, body and spirit is developing, and substance abuse can only further complicate this. Research shows that the adolescent brain lacks critical thinking skills, and teens are at heightened risk to pursue risky endeavors because their brain is still developing these areas that would otherwise help them consider the consequences of these actions. Not only is the adolescent brain still developing during this time, but they’re more impressionable; peer pressure accounts for a huge part of substance use among teens, and their environment – both in the community and at home – can also weigh heavily on their likelihood for substance abuse.

Some adolescents abuse substances because they feel alone in the issues their facing, while others are looking for a sense of direction, and substances may seem to resolve that issue temporarily. The utmost healing occurs for adolescents who experiencing love, community and service in a holistic aspect – their mind, body and spirit.

How Addiction Affects the Mind, Body and Spirit

Mind

DrugFree.org emphasizes that in addition to the mood swings, the brain develops in an uneven pattern, from the back of the brain to the front. Because of this, adolescents struggle with reasoning and impulses, which makes them more susceptible to addiction. The brain is made up of billions of nerve cells, and the signals that get passed between these nerve cells are sent through neurotransmitters – some of which send signals of pain or pleasure. When adolescents abuse substances, a surge of dopamine (a “feel-good” chemical) floods the brain, and, over time, the adolescent brain becomes dependent on these substances – and if a teen stops substance abuse, they’re likely to experience irritability, tiredness and other withdrawal symptoms.

Body

The body has become used to these substances, and a number of physical effects may be visible, such as:

  • Noticeable tiredness
  • Constricted pupils
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Red, flushed color to the face
  • And more

Many parents may begin to recognize a different “smell” on their adolescent or in their bedroom, as some teens may attempt to “cover up” their substance abuse with sprays or perfumes.

Spirit

During this stage in adolescence, youth are still learning about who they are and how they fit into society. Substances can mask some of this development by leading many teens to continue down a path that significantly disrupts their happiness and health in the future; one individual shared his story of struggling with addiction as a teen via DrugAbuse.gov. Here is an excerpt from his story:

“When you’re growing up and you’re falling into a chaotic pit of mental health issues, you can often feel alone. You definitely feel like an outcast. You feel like you’re the only person in the world who’s going through this.”

Spirituality is a topic that goes undiscussed in many families, but treatment that focuses on this – as well as the mind and body – can truly transform an adolescent’s life.

Spirituality and Adolescent Recovery

A 2014 study published in the journal Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly found that when spirituality is addressed in adolescent treatment, they’re more likely to not only relate to a more spiritual side of themselves but they’re also likely to remain abstinent after treatment as well. Rather than feeling as though they’re the only one in the world struggling with the issues they face, teens experience more prosocial behaviors when spirituality is addressed, such as:

  • Exhibiting greater care for others
  • Volunteerism
  • Feeling part of a community
  • Experiencing greater clarity of their purpose in life
  • And more

Spirituality can be uplifted in a multitude of ways, including 12-Step programs. In 2017, researchers compared 10 sessions of motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive behavioral therapy to 12-Step facilitation for 59 adolescents in addiction recovery. After 3, 6 and 9 months of assessing the results between adolescent groups, the researchers found that 12-Step facilitation helped teens remain abstinent longer – a sincere concern that many families have while their teen is in recovery.

As The Association for Addiction Professionals notes, spiritual concerns (such as feeling alone in the world, lacking purpose or having trouble caring for others) cannot be fixed with substances. Teens learn that becoming part of a community, helping others and receiving support in return, they can heal from addiction.

Seek Help Today

Don’t wait any longer to get your adolescent help for substance abuse. Recovery is right around the corner, and with a team of healthcare professionals who truly care, they’ll be on their way towards happier, healthier living. Call Cumberland Heights today.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

is there hope for our communities from addiction and recovery?With such high rates of substance abuse in our nation, it’s safe to say that community members and healthcare professionals alike have been concerned about how we’re going to address such a rampant issue. News and media outlets tend to portray mostly negative stories, which may only lead us to feeling more hopeless about those around us seeking the help they need. If this is where you currently find yourself, know that you’re not alone – but there are steps being taken to help people, and there are so many people who care. Amidst the chaos of addiction, we can remain calm and resilient – and by staying positive, we can help guide those around us to change their lives for the better.

The Surgeon General has provided several notes of hope for those who are skeptical on the progress we’ve made so far in addiction recovery:

  • Policies and programs have been developed to help prevent drug and alcohol misuse
  • As more research has been conducted, we’re becoming even more aware of addiction effects, treatment outcome and strategies to better help those who need it
  • Evidence-based treatments do restore people’s health and wellbeing
  • 12-Step programs are evidenced to help individuals find structure and support during turbulent times
  • Health care reform efforts are ensuring that healthcare providers are more integrative in their care
  • More support is even being offered in prisons to incarcerated individuals who need support in recovery

A 2016 study published in the journal Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly emphasized that community engagement is vital to recovery success; in our communities, we’re becoming more diligent in our efforts to educate everyone on the dangers of addiction, the effects to the mind, body and spirit, and of the many resources available for support. There is still hope in our communities – and by holding onto that hope, we can overcome one of the biggest battles our nation has faced: addiction.

If you’re ready to seek help today, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights to learn more about treatment and how we can personalize your own recovery plan. Recovery starts one step at a time – but one by one, we can make a difference in healing the lives of others.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Teens cutting off bad influencesWhen our adolescent has established a routine with friends at school – and they’ve considered them part of their social group – it can be hard for them to let go. Adolescents crave that sense of belonging, and while unhealthy, their social group may give them a sense of belonging. Even in the throes of addiction, those we abuse substances with may seem to be our closest friends at times – and it’s usually not until we’re sober and working towards recovery that we learn they’re really not the people who will help get us to where we need (and want) to be. This is a realization that your teen may need time to come to grips with – but you can certainly help support them in this.

It’s normal for your teen to feel a bit lost as they navigate their way through recovery. During an already confusing period of a person’s life, the changes that come with recovery can lead to a huge change on virtually all levels of their life. It’s hard to adapt to new changes, especially when we have no idea what lies ahead. You have to help your teen keep in mind the bigger picture, however – and remind them that this disconnection is the only way they can be sure to carry out the goals they’ve set for living a lifestyle that is conducive to their happiness and health.

A book published in 2016 titled Addiction, Behavioral Change and Social Identity: The Path to Resilience and Recovery states that in addiction recovery, we go through self and social identity changes; for example, teens may go from viewing themselves as “alone” in the world to a person who contributes to their community, and with this change comes different behaviors and activities that they’ll enact in real life. It typically starts with spending less time with past friends who used substances, and spending more time engaging in activities that add meaning to their life – such as through volunteering, school groups and more. Your teen will need to distance themselves from those they used to abuse substances with, and you’ll find that as they do this, they’ll begin to form relationships with others (and, with your help, they’ll have a better understanding of what type of relationships they really need in their life).

Major changes like this are challenging, but your teen has an entire network of social support around them – including those from treatment. You can start helping your teen develop lifelong friendships and meaningful connections that will have a strong, positive impact on their life – but as you explore this process, remember that it’s going to take some time. Work with them step by step, one day at a time.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

How television shows can threaten addiction recovery In 2016, Vice, an online source that provides information on politics, drugs, opinion, magazine and more, highlighted several television shows that seem to have missed the mark on providing accurate information on drug use:

  • Saved by the Bell
  • Beverly Hills 90210
  • Fresh Prince of Bel’ Air
  • And more

In the 90s, these shows depicted addiction as something that occurs quickly, with recovery being a simple venture that seemingly only takes one or two days. For example, in Saved By the Bell, Jessie Spano struggles with caffeine pill addiction – but once she becomes too overwhelmed by all of the homework that piles on top of her schedule, she suddenly “quits” her addiction. On top of showing viewers inaccurate information about what addiction’s really like, television shows tend to promote America’s drinking culture – and while they’ve gotten better, glamorization still exists. Shows like Breaking Bad depict the main character turning to crystal meth manufacturing to work as a criminal mastermind; shows like Weeds represent a suburban mom who becomes part of an international drug ring.

Dr. James Sargent, an associate professor of pediatrics in Hanover, New Hampshire, told ABC News,

“TV shows are becoming more edgy, and increasingly depicting more smoking and drugs.”

For friends and families of loved ones in addiction recovery, media isn’t always the first thought that comes to mind; television shows, movies and music can have significant influences on a person’s perceptions, even in the smallest of ways. Those in recovery may find themselves at increased susceptibility for cravings and urges to use, especially as these forms of media can bring about a certain mindset to use again or even the thought that “everyone else is doing it”.

In 2018, U.S. News highlighted that when we’re younger, we develop perceptions on topics such as addiction from our caregivers and those around us. As we get older, however, media reinforces the beliefs that we’ve developed, and those in recovery must be cautious as to what they watch – and listen to – throughout their recovery journey.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Using a holistic approach on recoveryAddiction doesn’t just affect vital organs and functioning in our bodies. It affects the way we perceive our surroundings and it significantly impacts that way we communicate with others, too. Most people would agree that when we’re abusing substances, we’re not our natural selves – we’re less coherent and more likely to act in ways that we would never exhibit having been sober. Even before abusing substances, our mind, body and spirit can be dismantled from trauma, mental illness, health conditions and other life circumstances. We are likely to find ourselves arguing with loved ones (or disconnecting from them altogether), abusing substances as a way to cope with painful feelings, missing out on important life events in pursuit of drug use and so much more.

A 2017 report published by the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction asked over 800 people in addiction recovery what had contributed most to their wellness overall. Here were the most common responses:

  • Friends
  • Family
  • Religion or spirituality
  • Meditation or mindfulness
  • Exercise
  • Nutrition
  • Pets
  • Art, poetry, or other creative activities
  • And more

As you can see, all of the elements that seemed to provide around 800 people with clarity and sustenance throughout their recovery revolved around the mind, body and spirit. In 2018, the U.S News highlighted numerous benefits of practices aimed at holistic health – such as stress reduction, lessened pain, enhanced sense of self, increased self-esteem, reduced opposition to treatment, positive behavioral changes in recovery, improvements in sleep and much more. Our lives consist of much more than substance abuse, so why would we focus solely on that in recovery? By addressing many of the areas that make up our lives, we’re much more likely to adapt a healthier way of thinking and being – which could dramatically change the outlook of our health over time.

If you’re ready to start a holistic approach towards healing and restoration, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. Your life matters – and by focusing on many aspects of your life that have previously held you back, you can take bigger and more meaningful strides towards living a healthier, happier life.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Teenage boys experiencing rehabAccording to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 1.3 million U.S. adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 had a substance use disorder (SUD) in 2014. During this transitional period, adolescents are at heightened risk for alcohol and drug use; the teenage brain has not yet fully developed, making it more challenging for them to exert critical thinking skills. If you have a teen who has been struggling with substance abuse, the sooner they seek help, the better. Teens have a high possibility of recovering from substances without taking it into adulthood if they obtain treatment early on; before pursuing treatment, however, you and your teen may be wondering what “teen rehab” truly looks like.

Personal Experiences

1. Admitting the Problem

In 2017, Tonic, a portion of Vice Magazine that covers trending topics on mind, body, healthcare and more, sought to get some information from those who’d attended rehabilitation for substance abuse as teens. Sammy, age 31, expressed that it was hard for them to go through rehab because they kept wanting to “write off” their drinking as part of teen experimentation. They stated,

“I actually struggled for a really long time to admit [I was a person with alcoholism] because I never did my drinking in bars and never got a DUI.”

Since drinking and drug use is often considered a normal part of “teen angst” or adventure, many teens in rehab must acknowledge that their patterns of behavior are not healthy for them.

2. Becoming Part of a New Community

Morgan, 22, explained that she got out of rehabilitation for Xanax, alcohol and opiates a month before her 21st birthday. Despite having gone through a journey to understanding that she did struggle with addiction, she came to know many people throughout treatment that helped her form a sense of community. She even came into contact with an old high school friend who had been practicing sobriety for a few years. She stated,

“A bunch of sober people showed up and I actually had a really nice time.”

As with anyone in recovery, teens will need to find people they can rely on who support their recovery efforts. Going back to the same social groups they abused substances with will only reinforce negative patterns of behavior.

3. Finding Yourself

Many teens become lost during these developmental years, as they’re trying to figure out who they are. They’re more susceptible to follow through with peer pressure because they want to “fit in” and, without having a clear sense of their own values, beliefs and identity, they’re at an increased risk for making impulsive decisions. Jamie, 23, told Tonic that despite her friends believing her weed and alcohol addictions were simply “phases”, she came to realize that it was through rehabilitation that she gained a sense of clarity about who she was. She stated,

“Most of my peers are popping Adderall when midterms and finals roll around. I can become envious at time…But then I think: how awesome that I get to do this sober – it’s all me!”

Components of Rehab

Therapy

Teen rehabilitation is similar to adult rehabilitation in that individual therapy and group therapy is going to be a part of the daily experience. Teens need someone to talk to – someone to learn more about addiction from, someone to share their experiences with and someone to develop healthy ways to work through thoughts and emotions. The Fix highlights many benefits that therapy can bring to our teens:

  • Guidance through a sensitive time
  • Mediation in family work
  • Mental health “tools” and ways of thinking about substances
  • Enhanced learning opportunities

Environment

In residential treatment programs, teens are provided with much more guidance and support than they would receive attending anything else. Here are some specific benefits of residential treatment:

  • An environment with no triggers – teens who are not surrounded by friends they abuse substances with are able to heal much more efficiently than those with constant reminders
  • Families receive a short break – for many families, a break is exactly what’s needed when their teen is in and out of trouble with substances. Family members can take a step back from unpredictability and feel safe in knowing their teen is being well taken care of.
  • Structure – with daily schedules, teens quickly learn to formulate a plan from morning to night. There is little down time for them to think about acquiring substances – and residential treatment will ensure that all their activities planned throughout the day promote their sobriety, healing and recovery.

Support

Teens need as much support as possible, and this accounts for all aspects of their lives. With an entire healthcare team by their side, teens are encouraged to live a life that speaks to their mind, body and spirit. 12-Step models of support provide youth with clinical therapy, educational services and adventure programming – all of which speak to the heart of recovery.

Education is incredibly important for teens during this time, and recovery shouldn’t set them back. ARCH Academy specifically offers a fully accredited private high school with grades 7-12 and includes GED prep, credit recovery options and follow-up placement. Between the love and support provided by staff, to the teachers, to their therapist and their family, teens are set up to succeed.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Woman showing drug-seeking behaviorsAddiction is a huge epidemic in the United States – in fact, a study conducted by the Pew Research Center found that almost half of Americans have reported having a friend or family member who struggles with addiction. One of the best ways that we can combat this epidemic is to keep our eyes and ears open for others who may need support. Knowledge is power and providing the right resource to someone who needs it could truly change their life for the better. Healthcare workers are certainly likely to be exposed to more drug-seeking behaviors, as the doctor’s office is a common place for this to be enacted. Nonetheless, being aware of the types of drug-seeking behaviors can help us better identify them if they appear from our loved ones.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency notes that many people who are seeking out drugs will want to make a doctor’s appointment at the very end of the day. They may not wish to disclose where they live and they may display unusual behavior while waiting for the doctor. The following are some other common drug-seeking behaviors:

  • Asking for a specific kind of drug while being inflexible to trying something else
  • Seeming to have a lot of knowledge about various drugs
  • Acting very demanding and assertive when it comes to getting drugs, with little patience
  • Using tactics such as telling a tragic story in order to obtain medicine in light of a doctor’s sympathy
  • Going from doctor to doctor or hospital to hospital, hoping to receive more of the same drug from different places
  • And more

A 2017 study published in the journal PloS One emphasized that when these behaviors are exhibited, physicians are much more likely to feel concerned that drug dependency is taking place. If you’ve noticed any of these signs from your loved one, this means it is time for them to seek help.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Call us today at 1-800-646-9998 to take the next step towards your happiness and health.


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