Tag Archives: substance abuse

Tag Archives: substance abuse


ABOUT ADMISSIONS & MARKETING SYMPOSIUM

DATE: April 2-3, 2020
LOCATION: Cumberland Heights River Road Campus

There is no greater purpose in our field than to be a resource to the clients and families we serve.

Southeast Admissions & Marketing SymposiumWhat started as a dinner conversation in 2012 about the need for quality training and collaboration for our admissions and marketing teams has developed into an event many treatment center owners and executives count on to provide ethics, leadership, mentorship and collaboration for their employees. This unique professional development opportunity is attended by seasoned professionals and newbies alike, and is packed with outstanding informational keynotes and breakout sessions applicable to all.

As a program executive, admissions or marketing representative, you have the potential to change lives and heal generations of families. Every call or contact with a family is an opportunity to help. That initial voice on the phone, be it a receptionist, intake person or community representative, may be the only person the caller ever reaches out to. Our responses and communication with that person are vital. Raising the professionalism in our field with education, ethics, shared experience and communication of knowledge is essential to achieve success.

Our hope is that no matter how long you have been in the field – be it 10 years or 10 days – there is something new for you to learn and share at the Admissions & Marketing Symposium. It is our vision and goal to transform our field into a shared mindset of abundance rather than be divided by scarcity or competition. To collaborate and connect professionals and families with the best treatment resource and opportunity for healing is the take-away message for the event. These opportunities may or may not always be within the centers we are representing, so by sharing information, we will be better able to make the best referral for each and every family and we will continue to grow and save lives. The character traits you nourish, skills you develop, and new information you learn will benefit both your own personal and professional development as well as the success of your center.

The Admissions & Marketing Symposium is the ideal place to find collaborators and mentors, colleagues with years of experience and attitudes of abundance. Join us in this sharing of knowledge and support the change we wish to see in this field.

Every parent wants the best for their child. You take them to school, put band-aids on scraped knees and help them through life’s challenges. By showering your child with care and love, you set them up for success, all while hoping that nothing bad will ever happen to them.

Unfortunately, addiction does not discriminate. According to a recent survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), over 20 million people in the United States have a diagnosable substance use disorder. No matter how well someone’s life is going, it is possible to start down a slippery slope of drug or alcohol misuse. If you notice that your child seems to be struggling with addiction, there are specific steps you should take today.

Is My Child Addicted?

Before confronting your child, you should first determine to a reasonable degree of certainty that they are misusing drugs or alcohol. Signs of substance use include:

  • Becoming secretive
  • Lying about their whereabouts and activities
  • Socially isolating themselves from family and friends
  • Seeming “off” – acting restless or extremely sedated
  • Exhibiting external signs, such as dilated or constricted pupils, skin picking, or rapid weight loss
  • Spending time with new, unsavory “friends”
  • Finding paraphernalia or signs of drug use in their room

It is important to note that some signs of substance use, such as secretive behavior or changes to one’s personality, are also hallmarks of young adulthood. It is natural for teenagers to withdraw from their parents and attempt to act out or assert their independence. Because this is exactly when they are at risk for addiction, parents must navigate this difficult time by upping the strength of the relationship with their teen.

Strengthen Your Relationship

Young adulthood is a difficult period full of transitions and tough choices. This is when open, honest communication becomes a key pillar in any parent/child relationship. By asking nonjudgmental, open-ended questions and creating opportunities for topics to be explored in a safe way, you can ensure that your teen will feel safe coming to you with any struggle.

If this is not the way your relationship has functioned until now, it is not too late to change. When speaking to your addicted child, stay focused and engaged on what they are telling you. Always respond kindly and try to diminish negative reactions when possible. Overt emotionality is not helpful in these conversations; if you are too upset to properly regulate your feelings, try to set up a plan to revisit the topic when you have both calmed down. However, keep in mind that addiction is not a problem that will go away on its own – you need to step in to help your child find recovery.

Don’t Enable Your Child – Set Clear Expectations

One of the most difficult aspects of parenting a child with addiction is the breakdown of boundaries within the family unit. This disease thrives in secrecy and passive-aggression – if you don’t address it, nothing will improve.

It can also be tempting for loving parents to cover up for their child. Maybe they will call in an excuse to school when their teen is too hung over to attend or will even provide the financial means to purchase more of a drug when their supply runs out. Parents who exhibit this behavior focus on alleviating short-term pain, but they unintentionally reinforce their child’s substance use in the process. This is called enabling, and it is an extremely unhealthy approach to any loved one’s substance use disorder.

The best way to avoid enabling is by defining cause-and-effect consequences with your child. These boundaries should be set during calm periods, not during a binge or fight, and will help to define which behaviors will be tolerated. By holding to consistent standards, you can help your child to understand the problems inherent to their behavior. This also provides you with evidence of tested boundaries down the road. By painting a clear picture of their behavior, you will be better able to convince your child to accept treatment.

Identify Resources and Seek Treatment

Finally, you should seek professional care for your child and your family. Conduct some research to learn more about credentialed treatment centers in your area. Ideally, you will find one that offers the full continuum of care – this means that everything from detox and residential treatment to outpatient services and transitional sober living is provided by the same facility. The best programs will be accredited and will be helmed by industry experts who can help your child to rid their body of toxic substances while also building new, substance-free coping mechanisms for the future.

Don’t forget to care for yourself and other members of the family as well. Addiction is a family disease, meaning that everyone from parents to siblings can be affected negatively by one member’s substance use. Programs like Al-Anon can provide group support and individual counseling sessions can be helpful for the process of working through past trauma.


At Cumberland Heights, we transform lives, giving hope and healing to those affected by alcohol and drug addiction. Our rehabilitation programs for adolescents (ages 14-18) and young adults (18-25) are designed specifically for the complex needs of the younger generation. To learn more about our youth programming, contact Cumberland Heights at 800-646-9998 today.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

The Experiential Healing Center offers a training program in SomExSM: A Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction. Certification is offered to counseling professionals, but the training is open to anyone wanting to enhance their practice with a deeper understanding of the neurophysiology of trauma, emotion, and self-regulation. Some of the professions we have worked with are massage therapists, speech therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, physicians and, of course, psychotherapists.  A professional can participate in one module, or attend all four modules and participate in supervision for certification.

Created by Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport, this modality uses an inter-relational model of somatic awareness and experiential techniques.  It is highly effective in working with chemical and process addictions, trauma, and attachment disorders, with an emphasis on emotional regulation. This four-module training is designed to give therapists the tools to transform the nervous system around issues of trauma.

Participants will:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the neurobiological aspects of trauma on the body.
  • Practice Emotional Regulation techniques.
  • Practice Experiential techniques to help uncouple the freeze in traumatized individuals.
  • Learn interventions for harmony and repair around core attachment wounds.

​Friday, October 4th thru Sunday, October 6th 2019

Cost: $595 each module

REGISTER HERE

When Kent Fisher and Michelle Rappaport founded the Experiential Healing Center, they were extensively trained and highly skilled experiential therapists, using psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques to help clients access feelings and develop choice making about how they react and repair.

They certified in Somatic Transformation and began to incorporate the somatic techniques to help clients oscillate within their Optimal Arousal Zone in order to touch the edges of their activation and collapse. They began to see that the two schools of thought were not only mutually supportive, but also nearly seamless in their execution, and SomExSM was born.

We don’t wound alone and we certainly don’t heal alone. SomExSM–a Somatic Experiential intervention to treat trauma and addiction–honors this process, connecting the left-brain hemisphere of rationalization , reasoning and meaning-making to the right hemisphere’s capacity for social engagement and emotional processing.  It facilitates the repair of disorganized and insecure attachments of our childhood through somatic engagement and builds resiliency so clients are able to rediscover the Self that lives within all of us–playful, passionate, unashamed, unafraid, eager to learn and grow. At EHC we believe this is the difference between therapy and counseling. Therapy is a co-regulated process where therapist and client embark on a journey to recover and repair the Authentic Self.

SomExSM training will give you a deepened understanding of the neurobiological aspects of trauma, disordered attachment and addiction. It will equip you with a valuable set of skills to facilitate repair and regulation in your clients–allowing them to explore life in the Optimal Arousal Zone known to us here at the Experiential Healing Center as Emotional Harmony.

ARISE® THREE-DAY COMPREHENSIVE CARE WITH INTERVENTION WORKSHOP

COURSE INFORMATION

PART I: ARISE® EDUCATIONAL INTENSIVE

A) ARISE® 3-Day Comprehensive Care with Intervention Workshop (no prerequisites)
This workshop can be taken:

  • By experienced interventionists choosing to learn a new model
  • By therapists, clinicians, counselors, and administrators as a general course with 28 PCB-approved continuing education hours
  • As the first step toward becoming a Certified ARISE® Interventionist (CAI)

Dates: Saturday, Sept 21; Sunday, Sept 22; and Monday, Sept 23
Training Time: 7:30AM – 5:00PM
Location: MARLBOROUGH, MA

REGISTER HERE

**Please plan your travel arrangements around completing the course by 5:30 p.m. on Sunday. Any missed training time can be made up in a one-on-one Skype session with an ARISE® Trainer at the rate of $250/hour. Typically, missing one morning/afternoon session will require 1 – 2 hours of make up time. Please make arrangements with the training office.

The curriculum provides:

  1. Practice of learning ARISE® Comprehensive Care with Intervention:

    • Learning to conduct the three levels of the ARISE® Intervention
    • Applying ARISE® Comprehensive Care / Case Management
    • Building a family genogram and recognizing family patterns
    • Mobilizing a family support network
    • Determining level of care
    • Understanding when an intervention is necessary
    • Collaborating with family, support network, professionals and treatment providers/facilities
  2. A theoretical overview of:

    • The origins of addiction
    • The relationship of trauma and loss to addiction, behavioral health, and mental health issues
    • The role of families in recovery from addiction and mental health challenges
    • The 3 Pennsylvania Certification Board (PCB) approved intervention models, their history, and relevant data
    • ARISE® research and outcome data
    • Neurobiology and addiction
    • Professional ethics
  3. Training Methodology:

    • Hands-on skill building
    • Experiential exercises and role-plays
    • Video
    • Small and large-group exercises
    • Interactive lectures
    • Homework

B) ARISE® Practicum (optional)

Prerequisites

Complete 3-Day Comprehensive Care with Intervention Workshop ARISE® Practicum Information Apply and practice the ARISE® method with a hypothetical case to familiarize yourself with the protocol. Participants create, develop, and present a hypothetical case using the ARISE® method.

PART II: BECOMING A CERTIFIED ARISE® INTERVENTIONIST

TRAINERS

  • Judith Landau, MD, DPM, LMFT, CFLE, CIP, CAI| President, Founder
  • James Cowser, LCSW, ICADC, ICCDP-D, CAI | Senior ARISE® Faculty

How prescription opioid abuse is becoming a danger within family members

The opioid epidemic has sparked numerous discussions on how, why, and what consequences are deriving from substance abuse – whether it’s originally intended or not. Many people find that while they’re taking opioid medication for a health concern – chronic pain, for example – that it becomes more and more difficult to manage the medication as their body develops a dependency. In other circumstances, however, friends and family members are finding ways to obtain opioids as a “quick fix” without having to seek out a primary care physician for their concerns.

Wilson Compton, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explained for Kaiser Health News a few years ago that leftover medications are becoming an issue – and he wasn’t incorrect. The National Safety Council notes that every day, more than 100 people die from opioid drugs, and it’s often because people are taking 1) medication that isn’t prescribed to them, which affects their body differently, 2) medication in larger doses than is prescribed and 3) medication for longer than they really should be. Dr. Don Teater, a family physician, sums up the opioid epidemic by stating, “Painkillers don’t kill pain. They kill people.”

When medication is easy to access, such as from a friend or family member, the potential for drug abuse increases. This is because there is less regulation and maintenance involved – and what may seem like a “one-time” initiation from a loved one could turn into a full-blown addiction later on, even if that means friends or family members are beginning to ask other people for the drugs, too.

If you’ve been battling substance abuse, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. Recovery is absolutely possible – it’s never too late to turn your life around, and there are many people here who are ready to support you in healing.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Parental addiction on the rise

Substance abuse is a major concern to people of all ages in the United States; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) published an article in 2017 explaining the various effects of parental addiction that also impacts children and other family members, such as:

  • Failing to pay the bills
  • Being unable to control substance use
  • Violence in the home
  • Missed responsibilities
  • Parental neglect
  • And more

Parental substance abuse significantly affects children of all ages, with adult children also reporting significant effects years later from their parents’ substance use. Several studies have shown that children battle making friends, succeeding in school and maintaining healthy self-esteem when their parent struggles with substance use concerns.

Last year, Very Well Mind, a website that publishes information related to a variety of mental health conditions, explained that families can break up because of substance abuse – and when that happens, children are often left to grow up much earlier than anticipated. Neglectful parenting could mean that some children begin taking care of siblings at a very young age or even becoming involved in illegal activity in efforts to make money to pay the bills. Some children are exposed to harsh environments where drugs are used, which increases their risks for accidentally consuming drugs or even experiencing an overdose from them; and if help isn’t sought by the parent, risks may only worsen.

If you are a parent battling substance abuse, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. The only way that the family – and your life – can get better, is to seek treatment and begin your journey to recovery. It’s a long road, but it’s worth the effort – and your loved ones will be thankful that you seek the help you need.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers, and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Recognizing the early stages of dependency

Our society has created such blurred lines regarding what “counts” as addiction and what doesn’t, and for many people, the line of dependency is crossed without concern because it’s what “everyone else is doing”. The people we spend our time with tend to normalize certain behaviors for us, and if drinking or using drugs becomes added to the mix, we may find that we’re using more often – and developing a dependence to the substance – without even realizing it. Whether you’re concerned about yourself or a loved one, recognizing the symptoms of early stage dependency can give you a fighting chance of seeking help before a full-blown addiction develops.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) explains that dependence is quite different from addiction in that dependence primarily constitutes only the body’s adaptation to the drug, requiring the person to consume more of it in order to achieve a certain effect. When a person is in the beginning stages of dependency, they’re going to start increasing their substance use over time. This will lead to the following:

  • The person will start to need more and more of the substance in order to achieve the desired effect that intrigued them to begin with
  • A person may drink or use drugs a bit more than they originally intended – or they may stay out longer or continue to use substances even after a night out with friends has ended
  • If the substance of choice isn’t taken for a decent period of time, withdrawal symptoms may start to appear, such as: headaches, insomnia, irritability, nausea, loss of appetite, fatigue and more
  • As dependency develops, a person may have less and less of an interest in engaging in hobbies they used to enjoy – because they’d rather center their focus of attention on using

Addiction eventually develops once a person has continued abusing substances, despite their harmful consequences it’s causing to their home life, relationships, school performance, work projects and more. If you or a loved one are ready to beat addiction at the dependency stage, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights.

Cumberland Heights in Crossville Tennessee is a 12-Step based outpatient alcohol and drug rehab program. Cumberland Heights’ Intensive Outpatient Program is designed for individuals age 18 and above who may be in the early stages of dependency or are experiencing problems with alcohol or drug use. If you’re ready to seek help today, call us at 931-250-5200.

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Join us for a discuss on identifying the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders and their effects on the selection and design of measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in treatment contexts and psychology.

Event Details:

WHO: Nick Hayes PhD, LMFTA, LCDC
WHAT: Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment
WHEN: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center Auditorium (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
COST: $15 – Open to the public, FREE for CH Employees!
CONTACT HOURS: 3

REGISTER NOW

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to demonstrate an overall understanding of the historical context that supports current measurement practices in treatment contexts.
  2. Participants will be able to identify the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders.
  3. Participants will be able to select and design their own measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in psychology.

About the Presenter:

Nick Hayes holds dual licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist-Associate (LMFTA-TX) as well as a Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC-TX). He has advanced training in quantitative methods, neuro-analysis and systems theory. Hayes received his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from the Department of Community, Family, and Addiction Sciences at Texas Tech University, where he served as a student member in university’s Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities for the past eight years. He has also worked with the Cumberland Heights Foundation for the past year while finishing his PhD degree.


Recovery is Possible

Recover Life.

Secure Contact: Confidential Email Form

Call Today: 800-646-9998

Stay in the Know

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Get Confidential Help from Cumberland Heights Treatment Center

FOR A CONFIDENTIAL ADMISSIONS ASSESSMENT

If you or a loved one would like to speak directly with one of our licensed admissions staff, please call us now at (800) 646-9998 or submit the following information. If outside business hours, we will get back to you the following day.

* Required Field

×

Why is it so meaningful to give to Cumberland Heights?

Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

×