Tag Archives: Treatment

Tag Archives: Treatment


The stigma surrounding addiction recovery makes it hard for people to get treatment.Addiction is often accompanied by shame in the public eye, as depictions shown in the media portray a less-than-optimal view of someone who is going through more than what is seen on the surface. For those who don’t understand, it’s easy to judge – to assume that people choose addiction. The reality is that addiction isn’t the problem in someone’s life, it’s the solution to other problems they face – and without the right tools, resources and support, many people just don’t know where to turn. A 2017 study published in the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry noted that stereotypes about who people with addiction “really are” makes it only harder to move on, to recover, and to be part of society. The study’s participants provided several examples of this in their statements, such as:

  • Not wanting to be alone with someone’s possessions in fear that someone might think they stole something
  • Feeling as though they’ll never be able to get out of addiction because nobody else believes they will
  • Worried that what they say will be twisted into words that only serve stigmatization
  • And more

What happens for many people with addiction is that the stigmatization they experience becomes pointed inward, and they self-stigmatize; when this happens, they begin to dismiss themselves as valuable people who deserve to be a part of society – and so they withdraw and the continue to abuse substances in order to forget or set aside the negative feelings that come from society’s shame. As The Fix explains it, society tends to view addiction as a moral failure – they stated,

“When people obtain a stable recovery they are always presumed to be on the verge of relapse. The label, shame and stigma of problems with substances is always around – once an addict, always an addict.”

If you’re struggling with addiction, know that you’re not alone – and you deserve a safe, respectful environment where you can thrive.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Experiencing relapse dreamsSleep is an important topic of discussion for those in addiction recovery, both in terms of the quality and quantity of sleep. Since substances can have such a major impact on the mind and body, it’s not uncommon for those in recovery to have difficulty sleeping at night, and this could be for several reasons: 1) for many people, nighttime is when they use substances the most, which means their body is going to be more awake the later it gets, 2) withdrawal symptoms can peak around this time, making it hard to sleep, 3) relapse dreams can cause a lot of tossing and turning at night. According to Tonic in 2017, about 85% of people who’ve been addicted to alcohol or other substances will have a “using” dream – otherwise known as a relapse dream – within the first 2 months of their sobriety.

It can be terrifying for someone to be in the middle of treatment yet have a dream that they’re back where they were when actively using; One woman shared her nerve-wracking relapse dream that had her fearful that she was back to using again. She told Tonic,

“They were never fun. They were always similar: I pick up a drink or serve myself punch that I don’t realize includes alcohol, drink it, and am terrified that I will restart my primal obsession…I would wake up feeling scared, disgusted, and then so, so grateful.”

A 2019 study published in Science Daily found that these types of relapse dreams are most likely to happen in those with more severe addiction histories, but thankfully the frequency of these dreams is likely to decrease the more a person spends in recovery. Dr. John F. Kelly, author and expert on addiction recovery, told The Fix earlier this year that as the mind and body gradually adapt to life in recovery, the psychological “angst” that they experience over relapse will diminish.

When these instances occur, you have to ground yourself and remember that you’re fully in control. At Cumberland Heights, you have the comfort and support system of knowing that you’re where you need to be – in recovery, with minimal to zero triggers. Dreams can feel incredibly real, but in your waking life, you are taking steps towards sobriety. These beginning stages are going to be the most challenging – but once you get through them, you’ll become stronger.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Boy adolescent struggling with addictionDespite the fact that we’ve all been adolescents at one point or another, it becomes harder and harder as we get older to reel into the mindset that we held at that age. Even now, adolescents face unique pressures than adolescents 10 years ago; how can we tell what they’re really thinking? When substance abuse is involved, the quest to fulfill our youth’s needs becomes evermore challenging. We’re left in disarray as we scramble to find the answers – but without having a deep remembrance of what it’s like be an adolescent, we rely on punishments, strict curfews and serious talks – hoping that will solve our problems. Thankfully, researchers have explored the very responses that adolescents need during times of trial and tribulation – and this type of research can be used to benefit us in our own family experiences.

If you have an adolescent who’s been acting out, getting into trouble at school, home, or with the law and abusing substances, there is a path of healing for them. It will take time, effort and additional resources – but recovery is certainly possible and could even save their life. Three particular studies – one published in the International Journal of Criminology and Sociology, another published in the Journal of Adolescent Research and yet another published in the journal Spirituality in Clinical Practice assessed adolescent addiction recovery from diverse perspectives. Of all three studies, these were the most effective response methods shown to help adolescents recover from substance abuse disorders (SUDs):

  • Service to others – by helping others through volunteerism, adolescents are likely to be reminded of the many ways they can make a difference in this world. It promotes community, acceptance and overall purpose.
  • Love – many adolescents experience bullying or problems at home; love and kindness in recovery can promote their mind – and their heart – to remain open.
  • Social activities – as human beings, we’re social creatures. We thrive on being around other people and feeling a sense of inclusion. Adolescents have been shown to thrive when engaged in social activities as part of recovery – because it gives them a chance to reconnect with others in fun, meaningful ways.
  • Spirituality – 12-Step programs, in addition to learning the importance of love, kindness, respect, gratitude and community, can all have significant positive influences on adolescents’ addiction recovery.

Don’t wait any longer to speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights regarding you or your child’s struggle with addiction. Healing and restoration is right around the corner – it’s up to you to take the first step.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

The harms and consequences of intravenous drug use Those with addiction are already placed at high risk for health conditions, but the method they use to take their drug of choice can also have a huge impact on their health. Illicit drugs – such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, ketamine, PCP and more – can be injected different ways, including through the veins. Intravenous drug use tends to give people a “high” much quicker because the drugs are injected directly into the bloodstream; although it appears to a fast-acting method for consuming drugs, there are major risks involved – and it can be fatal.

The Rise of Drug Injection

Intravenous drug use has become an increasing concern as the heroin epidemic has grown. In 2017, researchers from the University of Southern California collected data from 776 active drug users; on average, the researchers found that it took around 6 years for these individuals to escalate from first using illicit drugs to injecting drugs for the first time. Adolescents are likely to try intravenous drug use if they’ve smoked crack cocaine for a short period of time, according to a study published in Public Health Reports. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that globally, around 13 million people inject drugs; Ricky Bluthenthal, a research from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, stated in 2017,

“The prescription opioid epidemic is creating a heroin epidemic, which will create an injection drug use epidemic. We’ve seen the first two. Now we’re waiting to see the last emerge on the national level. I predict we’ll see an uptick in injection-related diseases over the next couple of years.”

With so many lives at stake, it’s important that we explore the health risks associated with intravenous drug use – and provide more support for our loved ones to seek help sooner rather than later.

Intravenous Drug Use

A 2016 article written by a researcher from the University of Rochester highlighted that alongside drug injection comes subcutaneous injection, also known as “skin popping”. With this, an individual may inject drugs directly into the skin. Furthermore, drug injection can also be done in a muscle tissue. Heroin is the most commonly used drug for this method, but practically any drug can be injected intravenously if broken down.  Intravenous drug use involves needles and syringes, and many people with active addictions find themselves sharing these tools. Unfortunately, this is where a lot of seriously complex health conditions can arise.

Serious Health Issues at Risk

The sharing of needles from intravenous drug use can cause serious health conditions to arise, such as HIV. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus spread through certain body fluids which attacks the body’s immune system. Over time, HIV destroys so many cells – CD4, or T cells – that the body can no longer fight infections and disease. If this virus becomes its most severe state, AIDS can develop. With AIDS, a person’s immune system is so significantly damaged that they get an increasing number of infections; As the government has noted, there are currently no cure for HIV –  a person can only pursue proper caretaking and by undergoing a form of treatment called antiretroviral therapy, or ART.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) argues that in addition to HIV, two other serious health issues can arise, such as:

  • Infection of the heart and its valves (a condition known as endocarditis)
  • Skin infections (a condition known as cellulitis)

Hepatitis C is another deadly disease that can occur from sharing needles and from misguided judgment of sexual activity from abusing drugs. A serious liver disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that around 75%-85% of those with this disease will go on to develop a chronic infection, and 10%-20% will develop cirrhosis over the next 20 to 30 years. If a person develops Hepatitis C from needle sharing, there are a variety of symptoms that can take place short term:

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Joint pain
  • And more

The sooner a person can seek treatment, the greater their likelihood of protecting themselves from further development of any of these life-threatening health conditions.

Treatment

Intravenous drug use is increasingly common, but the health risks can be mitigated if a person seeks help as soon as possible. For those struggling with addiction, Cumberland Heights offers residential treatment programs to provide the intensive support that those recovering need. Treatment will most often begin with detoxification, in which a person’s body naturally cleanses itself of the toxins acquired from drug use. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is also an option, which can help ameliorate some of the pain and discomfort associated with withdrawal effects.

Speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights to learn more about the various treatment programs your loved one may benefit from.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

How interventions could help a loved one seek treatmentIf you have a loved one who is struggling with addiction but hasn’t sought treatment, then you may be like many other families in the United States – and worldwide – who want the best for their loved one, but don’t know what to do. You may have tried talking to them, only to find their denial that they even have a problem. On the other side, you may feel personally responsible for their substance dependency – as many family members experience shame, guilt, sadness and more when they discover their loved one’s struggle with drugs. If you feel as though you’ve tried everything under the moon but still cannot convince your loved one to seek help, you may want to consider hosting a family intervention.

Addiction interventionists are experts who are trained to help friends and family members plan and stage the entire intervention process. They can help in many ways:

  • They may guide you in choosing the best time to host the intervention (such as never doing so when a loved one is “high” or intoxicated)
  • They may encourage family members to speak from the heart, which could help give these individuals courage throughout the intervention
  • They may help a loved one feel supported throughout the intervention, as to prevent them from feeling “attacked” or “cornered” by friends and family members
  • They may assist in helping family members prepare what they’d like to say
  • And more

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), family support is often the common denominator for those undergoing treatment from addiction. If family members step forward and emphasize that their loved one needs to seek help and that they’re willing to help them, there is a much greater likelihood of help being sought. For many people, though, interventions are a huge influencer in this situation – because those with addiction often believe they do not have a problem.

If you’re ready to speak with an interventionist, contact Cumberland Heights today. We work with a number of top-rated interventionists which can also assist in making arrangements for your loved one to reach our facility.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Teen boy detoxing in treatment centerWhy Your Teen Should Never Try to Detox at Home

It’s a common thought that runs through the mind when a person is desperately ready to detox – doing it at home. For many, this idea seems not only convenient, but more comfortable, too, since they’ll be at home. Adolescents may not fully understand the dangers associated with this, however; detoxification is a serious process that can go deadly wrong if not approached correctly. Movies and television shows glamorize at-home detox by showing teens lying in bed, experiencing minimal withdrawal symptoms but recovering after only a few days of minor care from a loved one. The reality, however, is that detox can be much more than that – and considering the fact that the pre-teen brain is still developing, detox is most safely done in a professional setting.

The Risks of Teens Detoxing at Home

A teen’s central nervous system can adapt to become highly dependent to certain drugs, which means that the greater the severity of dependence, the more serious the detox. If improper preventative measures are taken, detox can lead to life-threatening medical conditions, such as seizures or heart problems. Severe withdrawal symptoms are also a huge risk as they may become too uncomfortable; in these instances, teen’s may find themselves in a high-risk situation with nowhere to turn.

The Benefits of Seeking Treatment at ARCH Academy

At ARCH Academy, your teen will be surrounded by a healthcare team who can monitor them 24/7 to ensure that they’re on the right track. Elements of treatment – such as therapy, school and study sessions, prepared group meals, recreation, personal time and 12-Step meetings – provide a well-rounded approach to helping adolescents find community and healing in a safe environment.

Dr. Marienfeld, a physician and expert on addiction, told Yale Medicine in 2017,

“If someone is struggling with severe dependence, they may be out on the street or doing desperate things to try to support their habit. There can be health consequences and legal consequences if they can’t start treatment right away.”

Don’t wait any longer to help your teen seek treatment. Detoxing at home can be unpredictable but receiving care from Cumberland Heights’ ARCH Academy  means that your adolescent will be in good care.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program located in Kingston Springs that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966, and is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.

Woman managing bipolar disorder in treatmentBipolar disorder (BPD) is experienced by around 2.8% of U.S. adults each year, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). A mood disorder, BPD can cause individuals to experience phases of mania, depression or both. Dr. Halaris, a psychiatry professor in Chicago, told Everyday Health that BPD can sometimes feel like a rollercoaster; for many individuals, mania can seem like a blessing after a period of depression, but substance use can quickly become a concern if a person is trying to manage their symptoms on their own. He stated,

“Bipolar disorder is more likely to lead to addiction than other mental health disorders. Along with alcohol, nicotine and cocaine use are two of the most common addictions with bipolar disorder.”

If a person is experiencing both BPD and a substance use disorder (SUD) at the same time, this is called a co-occurring disorder. A 2015 study published in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology argued that around 20% of those with BPD have a prevalence of an SUD, and integrated treatment is critical for these concerns. A life in recovery is manageable, however, as long as an individual receives personalized treatment to receive care for their specific needs. Treatment options may involve any of the following:

  • Residential treatment
  • Individual psychotherapy
  • Group therapy
  • 12-Step programs
  • Holistic activities such as yoga, meditation, art therapy, etc.
  • Medication-assisted treatment (MAT)
  • And more

As a 2017 article completed by researchers from Florida and Texas noted, both BPD and SUDs can have an impact on each other’s symptoms. If not treated appropriately, one disorder could exacerbate the other’s symptoms – which makes customized treatment even more of a necessity.

If you’ve been struggling with a SUD and a mental illness, such as BPD, at the same time, it’s time to seek help. With the tools and support from the recovery community, you will be able to manage your life much easier. You’re not alone – start your journey today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

College students with substance use disordersCollege students – young adults – face so many challenges when it comes to addiction because of the accessibility and normalcy associated with college drinking culture. Considered a new-found form of “freedom”, many young adults find themselves testing the boundaries of what they can get by with – and substance abuse is a common ground of exploration for students. Bars are conveniently located near college campuses and weekend parties make it that much easier to use. It’s all fun and games until somebody gets hurt – but unfortunately for many college students, substance use disorders (SUDs) are left untreated.

12-Step programs provide young adults with a support network whom they can rely on in times of need. Many young people aren’t fully aware of the effects of their substance abuse; they often don’t realize the dangerous effects until they’ve developed a full-blown addiction. A 2015 study published in the Journal of Addictive Diseases discovered that many young adults do find hope and support in 12-Step programs; in fact, previous research has shown that social support is an incredibly powerful influencer to those in recovery.

Researchers from around the United States sought to explore the general characteristics of college students who have attended 12-Step programs. In a nationwide survey that was conducted, 486 participants responded – leaving us with some key insight to what our young adults are experiencing around this age:

  • Most students had used multiple substances and had higher levels of SUD severity
  • Twice the national average of college students also smoked
  • Many college students reported series of homelessness and involvement in criminal activity

Co-occurring disorders seem to be a major concern for young adults, and the severity only continues to worsen the longer they avoid seeking help. The best way to combat these issues is to speak up when help is needed – to encourage our loved ones to attend treatment, to support them in recovery and to continue educating our communities on the serious effects of addiction.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

12-Step, AA groupOne person shared their story of success with AA through the Massachusetts Medical Society. Here is an excerpt from their story:

“My life is full of surprises all the time. I am grateful to have a program I can use to help me grow through life’s challenges. I no longer regret being an alcoholic since it is through my alcoholism that I have been able to grow and integrate a wonderful set of principles into my life.”

12-Step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) have led so many people to live happy, successful lives – but it’s only those who become truly dedicated to creating this lifestyle who reap the most benefits.  Such as with the story above, individuals find the most success when they apply the principles; as with anything that takes time, recovery isn’t a “quick fix”; Ultimately, there are so many aspects to treatment that help people restore their mind, body and spirit – and we have to use them.

If you want to make the most of your 12-Step program this year, consider the following tips:

  1. Attend the meetings – even when you don’t want to. Addiction Professional, an online magazine that provides information on various topics related to recovery, denotes that the only way you’re going to get the growth that you need in recovery is simply by showing up.
  2. Let people get to know you. One of the main key points of 12-Step programs is to meet others whom you can build support with in recovery. The only way to do this is to let other people know you – over time and, when you’re ready, of course.
  3. Sit near the front. Just like in a classroom, those that sit up front are most likely to have the least distractions and get the most out of the information provided. Arrive early and get that seat.

While these tips may seem simple, all too often they get looked over – which makes it harder for those in recovery to reach their goals.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

Original Article by: Brittany Weiner, WSMV NEWS CHANNEL 4
Originally Posted on: January 29, 2019

As our country fights an opioid crisis, prescriptions for another class of drugs are seeing a steep increase, and they too can be dangerous and addictive. A new study just published this month shows between 2003 and 2015 Benzodiazepine prescriptions have doubled, and about half of them are coming from primary care physicians. Women are twice as likely to be prescribed than men.

Benzodiazepines are used for anxiety and insomnia but they can also be prescribed for chronic pain, and those prescriptions are skyrocketing. “Benzodiazepines are a class of medication that have a significant addiction forming liability,” Chief Medical Officer for Cumberland Heights Foundation, Dr. Chapman Sledge said. “If opioid prescribing goes down there’s some concern that Benzodiazepine prescriptions will continue to go up.” Dr. Sledge says many times these drugs are actually prescribed with opioids. “What we usually see if Benzodiazepine dependence in conjunction with opioid dependence or alcohol dependence,” Dr. Sledge said. A combination that can be dangerous and deadly especially if used long-term.

“Benzodiazepines are not benign drugs,” Dr. Sledge said. “There’s good data that suggests the combination of Benzodiazepines and opioids prescribed together increases the risk of death by fourfold.” According to the study long-term use has also increased with continued prescriptions increasing by 50 percent.


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