Tag Archives: Education

Tag Archives: Education


Pathways to Recovery: A Clinicians Toolkit to Achieving & Measuring Success

Event Details:

WHAT: Pathways to Recovery: A Clinicians Toolkit to Achieving & Measuring Success
WHEN: September 27, 2019 from 9:00AM – 2:00PM
WHERE: Powell Church – 323 East Emory Road Powell, TN 37849
COST: $15.00 — General Admission (includes lunch) | $30.00 — CE Admission (includes lunch)
3.5 CE credits available (approved by NAADAC & NBCC) — All proceeds will benefit the Metro Anti-Drug Coalition

REGISTER HERE

Event Agenda:

TIME EVENT TOPIC
9:30AM Opening Remarks: Karen Pershing-Metro Drug Coalition
9:30AM – 11:30AM Using Measurement Based Practices in Treating Psychological Disorders
Nick Hayes, PhD: Chief Science Officer, Cumberland Heights
11:30AM – 12:00PM Lunch
12:00PM – 1:30PM Etiology, Assessment, and a THird Wave Approach to Treating Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders
Amanda Lewis, LCSW: Primary Counselor, Cumberland Heights
1:30PM – 1:45PM Evaluations

Since 1966, it has been Cumberland Heights’ mission to transform lives, giving hope to those affected by alcohol and drugs. Cumberland Heights recognizes addiction is a family disease and wants to provide support whenever possible. Our Family & Community Education Program is designed to provide education and support for those seeking recovery and those already taking the steps to transform their lives.

Event Details:

WHAT: Community Education Program
WHERE: Indian Lake Peninsula Church: 235 Indian Lake Road Hendersonville, TN 37075 – 235 Indian Lake Road Hendersonville, TN 37075
WHEN: Every 1st Thursday of the month from 7:00PM -8:30PM

REGISTER HERE

For more information, please contact Stacy Bridges, Events Coordinator at stacy_bridges@cumberlandheights.org or call (615) 390-8224.

Since 1966, it has been Cumberland Heights’ mission to transform lives, giving hope to those affected by alcohol and drugs. Cumberland Heights recognizes addiction is a family disease and wants to provide support whenever possible. Our Family & Community Education Program is designed to provide education and support for those seeking recovery and those already taking the steps to transform their lives.

Event Details:

WHAT: Community Education Program
WHERE: Belle Meade United Methodist Church – 121 Davidson Road, Nashville, TN 37212 (*meet in room 125)
WHEN: Every 3rd Thursday of the month from 7:00PM -8:30PM

REGISTER HERE

For more information, please contact Stacy Bridges, Events Coordinator at stacy_bridges@cumberlandheights.org or call (615) 390-8224.

Staying sober in college is about as foreign of an idea to some as going to a restaurant and not eating. You can watch just about any movie or tv show that takes place on a college campus and you’ll see keg stands, Jell-O shots and beer bongs galore. They even have a way of glamorizing the hangovers and next morning walks of shame. So, it really is no wonder some young adults in recovery wonder how they can possibly stay clean while still having a meaningful college experience.

College students: a culture of drinking and drug useGreg Snodgrass remembers that feeling. He is a Regional Outreach Coordinator at Cumberland Heights and spearheaded the design for Collegiate Recovery at the University of Alabama. But before all his success, he was lost.

“I lived my life in addiction for many years. I never thought that addiction would happen to me. I thought I could control it and that apparently was not the case. In my opinion drugs and alcohol were fun and that’s why I enjoyed them. However, at some point the drugs and alcohol stopped working and my life became miserable. I destroyed my college transcript and never thought I would return to college,” said Greg.

Greg Snodgrass, Regional Outreach Coordinator
Greg Snodgrass, Regional Outreach Coordinator

While in treatment in 2004, Greg was encouraged to apply to two Collegiate Recovery Schools. A Collegiate Recovery School is one with a supportive environment within the campus culture that reinforces engagement in activities free from drugs and alcohol. It is designed to provide an educational opportunity alongside recovery support to ensure students do not have to sacrifice one for the other. Despite Greg’s fears that he wasn’t smart enough to get into a program like this, he was accepted, went back to school and thrived in a way he never thought possible.

“I sat in the front row when I used to sit in the back of the class. I raised my hand, turned in my homework, went to office hours with the professor, asked for help, and never missed class unless it was a legitimate excuse,” said Greg.

Greg graduated magna cum laude. He has since make it his mission to help other college students who are struggling.

“I pictured college through the eyes of John Belushi in ‘Animal House.’ In many aspects, the party scene has not changed since the movie was first released 40 years ago. Collegiate Recovery is like a sober fraternity/sorority. It is a fellowship that enables recovering students to create an environment on campus safe and fun. Collegiate Recovery is designed to empower those in recovery to strive for success. Collegiate Recovery helps to squash the fear of ‘I am less than’ or ‘I am not smart enough.’ The program turns our fear into confidence by building a fellowship of students that help one another achieve the unimaginable in academics and life,” said Greg.

Cumberland Heights and Still Waters was recognized for their support of Collegiate Recovery

The three longest standing Collegiate Recovery Programs are Rutgers University, Texas Tech and Augsburg University. One of the first replication model Collegiate Recoveries is here in Nashville, Tennessee at Vanderbilt University. Once accepted in the program, students have access to academic advisors, tutors, study rooms, printers, computer labs, meditation rooms, seminar courses, peer mentors, housing, scholarships, waived out of state tuition opportunities, recovering students and all other resources your higher education tuition has to offer. Essentially, it’s a fellowship. This is important because Academic Institutions can be a hostile environment for those in early recovery according to Greg.

“Collegiate Recovery helps you to change that lens and experience college as a recovering student. Students soon realize they can have more fun in their recovery than they did in their addiction. You can be successful in academics, friendships, relationships, life decisions, future careers and living life on life’s terms by being a part of a recovery fellowship on campus. I am living proof that it is possible to stay sober and enjoy life in college,” said Greg.

If you are your child is interested in learning more about Collegiate Recovery, contact Greg at greg_snodgrass@cumberlandheights.org or 615-879-7125.

We’re all guilty of it. Whether it’s jumping to conclusions, making generalizations or responding with emotion rather that sound evidence, unhealthy ways of thinking can creep up on us especially during stressful times. We’re not perfect so it’s okay as long as we can be mindful of when we’re doing this and take steps to change our thought process next time.

Below are the ten most common unhelpful thinking styles according to Adam Sicinski. Sicinski is an Australian life coach that uses mind maps and visual thinking principles. What are mind maps you ask? It’s an easy way to brainstorm thoughts organically without worrying about order and structure. It allows you to visually structure your ideas to help with analysis and recall. To the right you’ll see an example of a mind map.

Sicinski calls his unique mind maps IQMatrix. You can learn more by clicking here, but for the purpose of this article, we are just going to dive right into those 10 unhelpful thinking styles that when used too often can harm relationships and keep you from success.

Mental Filter

Here you tend to filter things in and out of your conscious awareness. This is a form of “tunnel vision” where you only tend to focus on a part of something and you ignore the rest. You might for instance only filter out all the negatives of a particular situation. You therefore only see the negatives and fail to recognize and acknowledge the positives. Your vision of reality is therefore based on your flawed perspective of the negativity you see in each particular situation.

Jumping to Conclusions

Here you tend to jump to unjustified conclusions. You make quick assumptions about how things are and what they’re going to be like in the future (predictive thinking), or you will assume that you know what someone else is thinking (mind reading). These conclusions and assumptions are not based on fact or evidence but rather based on your feelings and personal opinions. As such, they can often lead you astray down the wrong path.

Personalization

Here you tend to blame yourself for your problems and for everything that goes wrong in your life. You might for instance continuously blame yourself for your misfortunes and bad luck. This will be true whether or not you are responsible or partly responsible for the problem or misfortune. Taking responsibility for things is admirable, however, it can end up being a very burdensome habit-of-mind that leads to very strong feelings of guilt and regret.

                                                                             Black and White Thinking

Woman working through trauma in addiction recovery

Here you tend to only see the extremes of a situation. You either see one extreme or another and this is why it’s called black and white thinking. You will for instance either see the good or bad, the right or wrong, the sad or happy, the left or right, etc. And because of your extreme way of viewing things, there is never a middle-ground. As such you are unlikely to view things in an unbiased and neutral way.

Catastrophising

Here you tend to completely blow things out of proportion and make them out to be a lot worse than they should be. The reality of the situation might be quite insignificant and small. However, because you’re in the habit of catastrophizing, you always tend to make your problems larger than life — thereby making your problems even more difficult to overcome.

Overgeneralization

Here you tend to reference your past in order to make assumptions about the present. You might, for example, take one instance from the past and use that as a “predictor” or barometer for a current or future situation. Whenever you use the words “He always… She always… Everyone… You never… People never… I never…” you are at that moment overgeneralizing.

Shoulding and Musting

Here you tend to put unreasonable demands and pressure on yourself and on other people to do certain things. You tend to say, “I must… I should… You must… You should…”. These statements provide insight into the standards you tend to uphold and the things you expect of yourself and others. These standards can of course at times be helpful, however at other times “shoulding” and “musting” can create unrealistic expectations that you or others will struggle to live up to.

Labeling

Here you tend to label yourself or other people in certain ways based on behavior in very specific situations. These labels you make form your belief systems. Therefore the more times you use these labels the stronger your beliefs become. This can be a good thing, however, it’s unhelpful when you tend to label things a certain way despite the facts and evidence that are inconsistent with the labels you are making.

Magnification and MinimizationHow you should respond to alcohol cues in addiction recovery

Here you tend to magnify the positives attributes of another person, while at the same time minimizing your own positive attributes. You are essentially devaluing yourself — bringing yourself down — while raising the stature of other people. In this scenario, you tend to explain-away everything you have going for yourself including your positive traits, characteristics, and achievements as though they don’t matter.

Emotional Reasoning

Here you tend to base your view of a particular situation in accordance with how you’re feeling. Therefore your feelings dictate how you perceive a situation despite evidence to the contrary. As such you might choose to feel bad about something that is going to happen just because you are feeling miserable in the moment. You are therefore using your current emotional state as a barometer that directs how you will view your life and circumstances.

Again, if you find yourself using these unhelpful thinking styles, it’s okay. The harm comes when we repeat this way of thinking and do nothing to try and change it. If we take note of, and work to change our thinking styles, we will find our work relationships, personal relationships and oveall happiness will improve greatly.

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment

Join us for a discuss on identifying the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders and their effects on the selection and design of measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in treatment contexts and psychology.

Event Details:

WHO: Nick Hayes PhD, LMFTA, LCDC
WHAT: Grand Rounds Presentation: Feedback Informed Treatment
WHEN: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 from 1:00PM – 4:00PM
WHERE: Frist Family Life Center Auditorium (on the campus of Cumberland Heights)
COST: $15 – Open to the public, FREE for CH Employees!
CONTACT HOURS: 3

REGISTER NOW

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to demonstrate an overall understanding of the historical context that supports current measurement practices in treatment contexts.
  2. Participants will be able to identify the costs and benefits associated with applying measurement procedures in the treatment of psychological disorders.
  3. Participants will be able to select and design their own measurement protocols associated with evidence-based practices in psychology.

About the Presenter:

Nick Hayes holds dual licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist-Associate (LMFTA-TX) as well as a Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC-TX). He has advanced training in quantitative methods, neuro-analysis and systems theory. Hayes received his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from the Department of Community, Family, and Addiction Sciences at Texas Tech University, where he served as a student member in university’s Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities for the past eight years. He has also worked with the Cumberland Heights Foundation for the past year while finishing his PhD degree.

Music and the Brain Workshop with John McAndrewRecent studies show that music has healing effects as well as triggering effects for those in recovery from co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders. When we hear music, dopamine is released in the brain that creates pleasure. However, we know that memories are associated with music, which can trigger happiness or trauma. This session will review music and music therapies that are applied in a variety of treatment settings to bring about therapeutic change. Presenter John McAndrew will perform several compositions to describe the events in recovery that make a difference for people with substance use disorders, and dual diagnosis disorders.

Event Details:

WHAT: Music and the Brain Workshop
WHERE: Scarritt Bennett Center – 1027 18th Avenue South, Nashville TN 37212 – Laskey Welcome Center (2nd Floor-Laskey B)
WHEN: Friday, August 16, 2019
Registration/Breakfast: 8:30AM
Workshop: 9:00AM – 11:00AM
COST: $30.00 CEUs, $15.00 General Admission (Breakfast is included for all registrations)

REGISTER HERE

Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Define how music affects brain function in three different ways
  2. Describe how tonality is linked to emotions
  3. Experience a demonstration of how the brain predicts music and its effects on emotions

The Original AA Manuscript written by Bill WAlumni Relations of Cumberland Heights invites you to participate in Back to Basics: Steps and Stories. This intensive 12 step workshop, much like the original step working format from the 1940’s, is open to all persons in recovery.

All materials will be provided for participants as well as box lunches.

Event Details:

WHAT: Back to Basics – Steps and Stories
WHEN: Saturday May 18th 9:00AM – 4:00PM
WHERE: River Road Main Campus – Ishee Chapel

All three of our guest facilitators, Wally Patton, Brit Schanks and Carver Brown,  are experts in Back to Basics and have taken hundreds of people through the 12 steps in group settings.
We will begin promptly at 9:00AM and end at 4:00PM, please make sure to arrive no later than 8:45AM to get your supplies and seats. During lunch there will be an assignment to process with your partner or small group. Please be prepared to stay for the duration of the workshop, each participant should begin and end the day with the group.

  • STEP 1 - Personal Information

    The RSVP cost for this event is $5.00 per person. Please provide your name, email, cell phone and number of tickets desired to secure your reservation.

  • STEP 2 - Credit Card and Billing Information

    We accept MasterCard VISA American Express & Discover

    There is a required $5.00 charge per ticket that is non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund. Please select the number of tickets needed and enter your credit card number, expiration month and year, CVN number and billing address to where your credit card statement is sent below.

  • Due to limited number of tickets available we can only allow up to 4 people per family/reservation.
  • Ticket price total: .00

2019 Reaching New Heights - April 3, 2019
This annual women’s event is an important fundraiser for the alcohol and drug-addiction recovery center. The mission of “Reaching New Heights” is to highlight the women’s programs at Cumberland Heights, raise funds to help women in treatment and celebrate women in our families and community who are experiencing their own recovery one day at a time.

The 2019 Reaching New Heights Luncheon will be held Wednesday, April 3rd at 11:30am at Hillwood Country Club.

This year’s guest speaker is Tara Conner, Miss USA 2006.

WHO: Tara Conner, Miss USA 2006
WHAT: 2019 Reaching New Heights Women’s Luncheon
WHEN: Wednesday, April 3, 2019 at 11:30AM
WHERE: Hillwood Country Club – 6201 Hickory Valley Rd, Nashville, TN 37205

Due to the overwhelming interest in the luncheon this year we are currently sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list in case a ticket becomes available, please contact Rachel Williams at (615) 432-3228.

Teenage boy recoveryThe teenage years are a period of growth and development and as the brain is growing, so are our teen’s cognitive skills. These are core skills that we use to think, read, learn, remember, reason and more – since these skills are still developing in our youth, they are more prone to act without thinking about consequences, which is where addictive behaviors may come into play. By learning of some of the types of cognitive processes that are having an impact on your teen’s behavior, you may gain a clearer understanding of what your teen is likely going through. Addiction impacts everyone differently, especially our teens.

A 2015 review published in Current Addiction Reports noted several implicit cognitive processes that influence a teen’s tendencies towards addictive behavior, such as:

  • Attentional bias – how a teen may decide to choose substances over other activities
  • Biased action tendencies – the motivation to move towards or away from substances
  • Memory bias – associations to certain words, such as “Friday nights” or “feeling good”
  • Cue reactivity – activation in the brain regarding the use of substances

Frances Jensen, professor and author of the book titled The Teenage Brain, explained to the National Public Radio (NPR) in 2016 that a common misconception among many adults is that since their teenagers look like adults, they think like one, too. She expressed that the prefrontal and frontal cortex of the brain is responsible for critical thinking skills, which teens aren’t able to access as quickly since they’re still developing. She stated,

“An adult is much more likely to control impulses or weigh out different factors in decisions, where a teenager may not actually have a full on-line, in the moment capacity. And that’s why we see this increased in risk…”

If you’re ready to help your teen begin their journey to recovery, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Adolescent Recovery of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) originally began in 1985 when there were few other adolescent programs like it in the country. In 2019, we’re expanding our continuum of services with ARCH Academy, a unique program that offers 60 days to 6 months of residential care to adolescent boys ages 14-18 who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. This new program stems from Cumberland Heights, which has been around since 1966 and is located in Kingston Springs, Tennessee. The adolescent age is a critical time for development, making this a crucial time of positive influence. For more information, call us today at 1-800-646-9998.


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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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