Tag Archives: alcoholism

Tag Archives: alcoholism


This workshop aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shifts in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and will learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

This presentation aims to help attendees better understand substance abuse diagnosis, co-occurring issues and addiction in our society, shift in treatment options and guide in the pain recovery processes. Attendees will be encouraged and learn ways to provide useful methods for facilitating improved understanding and multiple approaches to address these problems from a clinical standpoint.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Agenda:

8:00-8:45 Registration Opens (Coffee served & Continental Breakfast)

8:45-9:00 Welcome to Attendees and CE announcements

9:00-10:30 The Blessings : Judith Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT

10:30-10:45 Break

10:45-12:15 The Neurobiology of Trauma : Mandy Baker, MS, LCDC

12:15-1:15 Buffet Lunch

1:15-2:45 Collaboration Model for Substance Use Disorder: Dr. Gregory Boris

2:45-3:00 Break

3:00-4:30 The Science of Measurement in Substance Use Disorder Treatment : Nicholas Hayes, PhD

4:30-4:45 Closing, Evaluations

Total Hours: 6.00 CE’s

 

 

Continuing Education

This program is co-sponsored by BRC Recovery and The Institute for Continuing Education. The program offers 6.00 contact hours, with full attendance required.

There is no additional fee for making application for continuing education credit. Application forms and other CE materials will be available on site. CE verifications are mailed to attendees within 30-days following the event. If you have questions regarding the program, continuing education learning objectives, presenters, agenda, contact The Institute at: 800-557-1950 / email: instconted@aol.com

NOTE: To receive continuing education credit, applicants must complete all CE materials, sign in/out at designated locations, and submit an evaluation form for the sessions attended.

NOTE: It is the responsibility of the attendee to determine if CE credit offered by The Institute for Continuing Education meets the regulations of their state licensing/certification board, including the Ethics Workshops scheduled.

Psychology: The Institute for Continuing Education is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Counseling/ MFT: Counselors will be provided with a Certificate of Attendance.

Social Work: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized as an approved provider of continuing education by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners, Provider 1416, expiration 4/30/20.

Non-Credit Events: Registration, breaks, and lunch

Skills Level: This program is open to mental health professionals of all skill levels.

Instructional Methodology: May include lecture, demonstration,  and audio/visual.

ADA: If you have special needs, please contact Ruth Ann Rigby at: Rrigby@brcrecovery.com

MCCME: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the MS State Medical Association and BRC Recovery. The MS State Medical Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The MS State Medical Association designates this live activity for a maximum of 5.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Event Details:

A Day with the Enneagram & Ian Morgan Cron
Join us for a day with Ian Morgan Cron & The Enneagram

When: Wednesday, January 29, 2020
Time: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Training Begins at 9:00 a.m.)
Where: Cumberland Heights River Road Campus (8283 River Road Pike, Nashville)
Cost: $15.00 (Lunch Included)

The Enneagram is a personality typing system that teaches there are nine basic personality styles in the world, one of which we gravitate toward and adopt in childhood to feel safe and navigate relationships. It is a powerful tool for individuals, corporations, and non-profits seeking to help their leaders and teams become more self-aware and productive.

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In this workshop, Wall Street Journal bestselling author, corporate consultant, and nationally sought after speaker Ian Morgan Cron (The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery) will:

  1. Introduce the Enneagram system of personality as a resource for personal and professional transformation
  2. Explore the nine types—how each sees the world, what motivates them, their respective strengths and challenges, how understanding the Enneagram can help leaders and professionals in the caring professions grow their effectiveness
  3. Explore the Enneagram’s potential application in the journey of recovery
  4. Discuss practical ways the Enneagram can dramatically improve the workplace

IAN MORGAN CRON is a bestselling author, psychotherapist, Enneagram teacher, Episcopal priest, and the host of the popular podcast, Typology. His books include the novel Chasing Francis, the spiritual memoir Jesus, My Father, the CIA, and Me, and The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery. Known for his transparency, humor and depth of insight into the inner workings of the human heart and mind, Ian uses the Enneagram personality-typing system as a tool to help leaders cultivate self-awareness and emotional wisdom. He is a sought-after speaker, thinker and advisor to a growing roster of clients such as the Discovery Channel, Ramsey Solutions, Michael Hyatt Company, Warner Brothers Music, OCLC, among others. He and his wife, Anne, have three children and live in Nashville, Tennessee.

Social: Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @ianmorgancron | Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @typologypodcast

Websites: https://ianmorgancron.com and https://typologypodcast.com

Online Course: Enneagram Made Simple – https://businessmadesimple.com/enneagram-made-simple-ian

Assessment: iEQ9 Enneagram Assessment – https://ianmorgancron.com/assessment

Cumberland Heights Sunday Sermon: Gratitude: The Power to Transform

Sunday Sermon: Gratitude: The Power to Transform

November 17, 2019
In a season of giving thanks, we take time to focus on the spiritual practice of gratitude and it’s ability to transform our minds, our lives, and our recovery. This message describes how gratitude can actually change our perspective in even the darkest situations and deepen our understanding of the spiritual principles of recovery: acceptance, hope, faith, surrender, humility, and others.


alcohol abuse impacts more than the addicted

The negative psychological, biological, and physical effects of alcohol abuse are well documented. But the adverse effects of abusing alcohol don’t start and stop with the individual who’s doing the drinking.

On an annual basis in the U.S., over 20% of adults are negatively affected by someone else’s choice to drink. This translates to more than 50 million people, and a recent study called this trend, “a significant public health issue.”

The study from Rutgers University was backed by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and analyzed information from nearly 9,000 subjects.

Over 15% of participants reported having a harmful experience as a result of another person’s drinking. In the study, “harm” was described as physical aggression, threats and/or harassment, financial or family problems, property damage, injuries related to driving and vandalism.

Threats or harassment were the most commonly reported type of harm overall. Additionally, men reported more instances of physical aggression, vandalism and damaged property, while women reported more monetary or family problems.

Female subjects were more likely to experience harm by a drinker within their household, while men had an increased risk of harm by drinkers from outside of their household.

Responsibility Over Privilege 

On the basis of these alarming findings, Dr. Timothy Naimi of the Boston Medical Center, stated, “The freedom to drink alcohol must be counter-balanced by the freedom from being afflicted by others’ drinking in ways manifested by homicide, alcohol-related sexual assault, car crashes, domestic abuse, lost household wages and child neglect.”

The study went on to find that overall, individuals younger than 25 were more likely to experience some form of harm due to someone else’s drunk actions. Significantly, almost half of the study’s participants reported being a heavy drinker as well as having been harmed by another person’s drinking.

Also of concern, it was revealed that casual drinkers have a two- to three-fold risk of experiencing driving-related harm or threats as compared to individuals who do not drink at all.

Recovery is possible—recover your unique, purposeful, sober life by reaching out to the dedicated experts at Cumberland Heights.

Addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. For over 50 years we have carefully provided the highest quality of care for adults, adolescents and families who suffer from, or are affected by this devastating disease.

Our nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center is located on a peaceful, pastoral 177-acre campus on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. We provide a continuum of services through two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes.

At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of family participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

How excessive drinking puts a risk on men’s health

Studies show that men are more likely than women to drink excessively, but what constitutes excessive drinking? According to the Centers for Disease Control, excessive alcohol use includes heavy drinking, binge drinking and alcohol use by pregnant women and people younger than the minimum legal drinking age.

Studies show that excessive drinking is linked to significant increases in short-term risks to safety and health. Additionally, men are statistically more likely than women to engage in greater risk-taking when drinking to excess, like speeding and not using a seatbelt while driving.

The statistics on male drinking are eye-opening. Research shows that over half of adult men surveyed (58%) have used alcohol in the prior month. Male drinkers are nearly twice as likely as their female counterparts to binge drink.

What Constitutes Binge-Drinking?

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, binge drinking is defined as a process of alcohol use that brings the blood alcohol concentration level to 0.08% or more. This drinking pattern most often is associated with 5 or more drinks in one sitting for men, 4 or more drinks for women and for both genders occurs within a span of 2 hours.

Additionally, roughly one-fourth of adult males binge drink 5 times a month, on average consuming 8 drinks.

Of the vast majority of individuals who binge drink, 90% are not alcohol dependent or alcoholics. What this means is that nine out of ten individuals who drink to excess would not be expected to meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for severe alcohol use disorder.

Professionals consider a severe alcohol use disorder, which was previously referred to as alcohol dependence or alcoholism to be a chronic disease characterized by discrete signs and symptoms. These include the inability to curb or limit one’s drinking and the need to drink more and more in order to attain the same effect.

Other symptoms include an obsession with wanting to drink to the point that other thoughts and concerns are pushed to the side, as well as continuing to drink excessively in spite of professional or personal problems that result from drinking.

A Few Questions to Ask Yourself

Have you wanted more than once to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to quit drinking, but could not? Have you cut back on or completely ceased participation in activities that are pleasurable, important or significant to you in order to drink? Do you spend a considerable amount of time drinking or getting over the aftereffects of drinking? Lastly, have you continued to drink even though it is causing trouble with your family or friends?

It is estimated that approximately 5% of men and 3% of women will meet the diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence within any prior 12 month period.

These eye-opening statistics lead to even more concerning scenarios that indicate the risk related behavior among male drinkers is greater and more injurious than among female drinkers.  For example, men are more likely to commit suicide versus women, and also more likely to have been consuming alcohol prior to committing suicide.

On a related note, between the genders, males consistently experience higher rates of hospitalization and death due to alcohol-related factors.

The concerning statistics related to male drinking don’t stop there, however. When it comes to fatal traffic crashes, male drivers are two times as likely as females to be intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or higher.

Potential Harm to Others

Lastly, excessive alcohol use raises the rate of aggressive behavior among men, leading to an increased risk of physically harming another individual. The potential negative outcomes of excessive alcohol use among men don’t stop there- excessive alcohol use adversely affects the body and can lead to a whole host of negative conditions.

For example, excessive alcohol use is known to interfere with male hormone production as well as testicular function. The impairment of these crucial body functions can lead to infertility, impotence, and a decrease in male secondary sex characteristics including the absence of chest and facial hair.

The damages of excessive alcohol use often involve harm to others. For example, in cases of sexual assault, alcohol is a common factor. Abuse of alcohol also increases the chances of taking part in sexual behavior that puts men at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, sex with multiple partners and unprotected sex.

The fact is that binge drinking exacts a toll on society in ways you may not have considered. The cost of excessive drinking in the U.S. in 2010 was nearly $250 billion. All together this number represents the costs involved in criminal justice expenditures, workplace productivity losses and health care costs.

There is also a long list of medical issues that present themselves when men drink to excess. Studies show that excessive alcohol use increases the risk of colon cancer as well as cancers of the liver, throat, mouth and esophagus.

How Can You Determine if You Have a Drinking Problem?

Drinking has become a problem in your life if it interferes in your relationships, in the workplace, in social activities or in school. Excessive drinking affects your ability to think and feel properly, resulting in poor decision-making as well as unresolved emotional issues such as anger, sadness, etc.

If you think that you or someone in your family may have a drinking problem, do not hesitate to consult with a professional about your concerns.

Recovery is possible—recover your unique, purposeful, sober life by reaching out to the dedicated experts at Cumberland Heights.

Addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. For over 50 years we have carefully provided the highest quality of care for adults, adolescents and families who suffer from, or are affected by this devastating disease.

Our nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center is located on a peaceful, pastoral 177-acre campus on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. We provide a continuum of services through two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes.

 At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of family participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

How adolescent drinking causes troubles in adulthood

Experts know that drinking during the teen years can result in a plethora of short-term consequences, but a new study finds that negative long-term effects can also linger into adulthood.

According to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, binge drinking during the teen years can lead to psychological problems later in life, and possible alcohol abuse in adulthood.

The researchers found that lasting brain changes occurred due to the effects on a protein necessary to form and maintain brain cell connections in the amygdala. The amygdala is key to mood regulation, including anxiety and fear.

Alarming Results

The study examined the amygdala tissue of deceased individuals who began drinking heavily before the age of 21, people who began drinking after the age of 21 and individuals without a history of alcohol abuse.

The findings were startling. Researchers found that those who began drinking prior to the age of 21 had irregularities in the brain not observed in the other two groups.

Study author Subhash Pandey explained that a crucial protein required for normal brain development, and for neural connections, had been altered due to the effects of alcohol abuse.

According to Pandey, “If levels are lowered due to alcohol exposure, then the brain will not develop normally, and we see that in these brain samples where there are abnormalities in another synaptic gene, ARC, possibly making abnormal connections between neurons.”

There is Hope 

In layman’s terms, the effect of alcohol abuse early in life raised the risk for psychological impairment later in life. This was due to adverse changes in the adolescent drinkers’ amygdala, which later was correlated to a higher risk of emotional problems.

For example, negative emotional states including anxiety, stress and irrational moods were suffered in greater numbers among the group of subjects who began drinking early, as compared to the other two study groups.

Recovery is possible—recover your unique, purposeful, sober life by reaching out to the dedicated experts at Cumberland Heights.

Addiction is a chronic, progressive and potentially fatal disease. For over 50 years we have carefully provided the highest quality of care for adults, adolescents and families who suffer from, or are affected by this devastating disease.

Our nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center is located on a peaceful, pastoral 177-acre campus on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. We provide a continuum of services through two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes.

At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of family participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

Recovery Live Podcasts

Recovery Live Podcasts - Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a few key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them.

Recovery Live Podcasts

Liz Stanislawski from Cumberland Heights sits down with a several key figures in recovery to discuss life and what sobriety means to them.

Listen to podcasts on your Apple® iPhone, Apple iPad, Google Android®, Mac/PC, Alexa smart speaker – and even in your car. For free!

Episode 1:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Travis Meadows

Travis Meadows Podcast – God did for me what I couldn’t do for myself.

Liz talks candidly with “Nashville’s Favorite Underdog” Travis Meadows about losing his brother at a young age, cancer, addiction and his treatment journal that inspired an album. Even with so much success, writing songs for Eric Church, Brothers Osborne and Wynonna Judd, Meadows says his biggest triumph is making it this far in his sobriety journey.

Episode 2:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Jaime G Podcast – Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Liz sits down with Jaime Gibbons, alumna of Cumberland Heights– to talk about what 16 years of sobriety looks like and how engaging with friends in recovery kept Jaime clean. Also in this episode: relationships that make you sick, a spiritual awakening while free-falling 30 feet, and Jaime’s greatest triumph in recovery. Hint: It’s a person and he only stands about 2.5 feet tall.

Episode 3:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Addiction is about isolation. Recovery is about connection.

Alexis H Podcast – I’m 100% grateful I’m an addict.

When Alexis went to treatment for the first time, she decided she was going to prove everyone wrong and not take any suggestions. When that didn’t work the first or second time, she finally decided to take all the suggestions when she was in treatment for the third time. Now sober for four and a half years, Alexis talks about how recovery got her through her parents’ divorce, allowed her to experience true joy for the first time, and make it possible for her to help other women struggling like her.

Episode 4:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Life actually has meaning to me now

Alex H Podcast – Life actually has meaning to me now.

Spending his early 20s in the restaurant industry meant late nights, free booze and social night caps. But as Alex explains, things got out of hand quickly and he found himself at Cumberland Heights. Fortunately, now in recovery, he’s able to use his talents as a chef to serve others fighting similar demons.

Episode 5:

Cumberland Heights - Recovery Live Podcast - Sobriety doesn't make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Todd M Podcast – Sobriety doesn’t make you happy. It removes the things that make you unhappy.

Imagine your drug-addicted lifestyle being broadcast on national television. It happened to Todd M. on the popular A&E show, “Intervention.” The season 16 episode followed Todd as he smoked meth and downed pills in his parents’ barn. This experience led him to Cumberland Heights, where he now works with three years of sobriety under his belt. Hear how Todd felt watching that episode for the first time, and why this Californian decided to stick around Tennessee.

Learn the danger of mixing anger and alcoholism

Previous research has shown that some of us have greater tendencies towards anger. Whether this has stemmed from genetics and upbringing, mental illness or simply the people we’ve spent time with over the years, anger can begin to flourish into our lives – and out of control – if we’re not careful. Anger in and of itself isn’t a bad emotion – but it’s how we utilize the anger that says a lot about the healthiness (or unhealthiness) of our relationship to it.

When alcohol is added to the mix, it often perpetuates those feelings of anger because they were already there underneath the surface – and in many cases, a person can display more aggression than they would sober, because their sense of judgment is now clouded by the alcohol. Dr. Robert O. Pihl, professor of psychology and psychiatry at McGill University, told Very Well Mind, a website that publishes information related to all things psychology, this year:

“Alcohol is involved in half of all murders, rapes and assaults. But the dynamics of this association are complicated, which is why any research that focuses on explaining this relationship is important for society in general.”

Those who find that they’re more irritable when drinking should carefully watch their drinking and behavioral patterns – if close attention isn’t paid, that person (and those around them) could be in harm’s way. Signs of alcoholism could also warrant a need for formal treatment, and the sooner that treatment is sought, the greater the chances that a person can learn healthy coping mechanisms – along with healthier ways to express anger – before it reaches this point.

If you’re ready to seek help for addiction, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today. It’s never too late to seek treatment – and in doing so, you’ll open your horizons for a healthier, happier life.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of two 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first. For more information, call 1-800-646-9998 today.

Connection between anxiety and alcoholismAnxiety is one of the most uncomfortable feelings to have because we’re essentially locked in this state of confusion – of not knowing what to do – but feeling as though we need to act immediately in order to solve whatever it is that we’re worried about. Like a deer frozen in headlights, our mind puts us in panic mode while throwing logic out of the window; it is for that very reason that many people turn to substances. In 2016, a young woman shared her story with anxiety and alcohol via Tonic, a website that provides entertainment and stories related to mind, body, healthcare and more. She stated,

“…For years I’ve struggled with an anxiety disorder that went largely undiagnosed and it manifested in the form of panic attacks…I wanted to be liked, included, and the same as everyone else…alcohol became the perfect device for soothing anxiety and turning off my mind.”

As it turns out, drinking to relieve stress and anxiety isn’t that uncommon; a 2017 study published in the journal Alcohol emphasized that alcohol can indeed reduce symptoms of stress-related disorders (such as anxiety) temporarily – but the problem comes when addiction is developed. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) states that 15 million adults in the United States have an anxiety disorder, and there are several signs that alcohol is being used to help reduce the symptoms of this condition:

  • Drinking four or more times in a week
  • Having 5 or more alcoholic drinks in a day
  • Not being able to stop drinking once a person has started
  • Needed a drink in the morning in order to get “going” for the day
  • Feeling guilty after drinking
  • Having a friend, coworker, family member or other relative express concern about a person’s drinking habits

Since alcohol is typically considered a socially acceptable activity in today’s society, this can make alcoholism much more difficult to detect. If you have a loved one who may be struggling with alcoholism, speak with a professional from Cumberland Heights today.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.

a couple whose intimate relationship is impacted by alcoholism.One individual shared their story via DrugFreeWorld.org about their experience with alcoholism and how it affected their social relationships. Jamie stated,

This past year I have gone to work drunk, blacked out in clubs and bars and can’t remember getting home…I have destroyed two relationships because I hurt them so much through my drinking, but I put drinking first.”

As the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) states, alcoholism can bring about a number of issues within relationship-contexts:

  • Violence
  • Marital conflict
  • Infidelity
  • Jealousy
  • Economic insecurity
  • Divorce
  • Fetal alcohol effect

Previous studies have shown that intimate relationships can experience vicious cycles of fighting and arguing, especially if one spouse is lying to the other or if one spouse isn’t happy with the others’ alcohol abuse. These relationships aren’t the only ones affected, however; children, relatives, coworkers, friends and more can all be strained when alcoholism is involved.

A 2016 study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships found that after assessing 181 couples where one had an alcohol use disorder (AUD), relationship satisfaction was shown to decline longitudinally. Another study assessed some of the relational issues that couples face when alcoholism is involved, and these were the five main themes discovered:

  • Emotional distancing
  • Increased conflict/arguments between partners
  • Regret/remorse for actions while intoxicated
  • Partners reaching out to friends/family members for support around partner’s problematic drinking, and
  • Unbalanced support or care between partners in the relationship

Even when a partner enters recovery, it’s difficult for many couples to get back on track with their relationship between so much damage has been done. In these instances, couples therapy is needed. A licensed therapist can work with couples to help them understand the nature of addiction and how it has impacted their relationship, which often serves as the basis for recovery groundwork. From then on, tools can be developed to help partners better understand and work with one another.

If you or a loved one have been struggling with alcoholism, it’s time to seek help. Don’t wait any longer to restore your mind, body and spirit.

Cumberland Heights is a nonprofit alcohol and drug-addiction treatment center located on the banks of the Cumberland river in Nashville, Tennessee. On a sprawling 177-acre campus, we are made up of 2 12-Step immersion campuses, 12 outpatient recovery centers and 4 sober living homes. We believe that each person has a unique story to tell – and that’s why we always put the patient first.


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