Tag Archives: Nashville

Tag Archives: Nashville


Original Article By: Seena Sleem, WTVF News Channel 5

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — As “National Recovery Month” wraps up, people from across Nashville showed their support to those who have struggled with substance abuse. RecoveryFest Nashville was held on Saturday to celebrate the positive impact of recovery from substance abuse and giving recovery the visibility it deserves.

“We need to recover out loud and events like this that bring recovery out in the open and helps break down stigma and shame of getting help is important,” said Cumberland Heights’ own Cindy Spelta, also co-chair of RecoveryFest Nashville, “there’s too many people suffering in silence so we don’t need recovery to be in silence.”

Spelta has been recovering for 17 years. She said part of recovery is knowing you’re not alone, that there is a community behind you and resources available to you.

At this event there were dozens of vendors with information regarding help and recovery, music and guest speakers. The event was held at East Park Greenspace and was free to the public.

Tennessee is one of the hardest-hit states when it comes to the opioid crisis. There were 1,268 opioid overdose deaths in Tennessee in 2017 and more than six million painkiller prescriptions in 2018.


At Cumberland Heights, we always put the patient first, and value the importance of active participation in the recovery process. Take the first step toward healing by calling us at (866) 899-5231 today.

An Evening with Travis Meadows: A Benefit for Cumberland HeightsTravis Meadows spent years trying to escape himself. He’s anything but selfish, so he’d find a way to get away––a bottle, a bag, a sermon––and he’d share it with everyone. That was then. Now, Meadows isn’t trying to get anybody lost or high. Instead, he’s trying to get every single one of us to settle in deeply to ourselves––and love what’s there.

“I feel like what I’m doing is giving people permission to be okay with who they are, where they’re at now,” Meadows says. “A lot of us say stuff like, ‘If I’d been married to this guy or this girl, or if I had enough money, or if I had a better job. If I wasn’t an alcoholic, or if I drank more. If this, if that, then, I think I could be a better person.’” He pauses. “I think the key to life is being okay with who you are.”

Meadows isn’t just waxing poetic about the perks of self-acceptance. The 52-year-old has clawed his way to the peace he’s found, and his willingness to map that journey through his songs has saved more lives than his own. On his anxiously awaited new album First Cigarette, Meadows proves once again that when he sings the truth he’s living, he can set us all free. “I’ve always put secrets in my records, but I had this ring of fire that nobody could get in––a defense mechanism from my childhood. Nobody gets too close,” he says. “I think this record is a way of me letting people in a little more, inside the ring of fire.”

Disciples have been dancing by Meadows’ fire for years. Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, Jake Owen, Mary Gauthier, Brandy Clark, Blackberry Smoke, Hank Williams, Jr., Wynonna Judd, Randy Houser, and others began writing with, recording, and praising Meadows as soon as they heard his work. Songs such as “Riser,” the title track for Bentley’s 2015 album; Church’s “Knives of New Orleans” and “Dark Side”; and Owen’s “What We Ain’t Got” are all Meadows-penned chart-climbers.

Much of the attention began in 2010, when Meadows self-released Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, a raw masterpiece that left listeners stunned. “I was in rehab, and one of my counselors suggested that I keep a journal, so I basically made a record out of that journal,” Meadows says. It became an unlikely phenomenon, handed from friend to friend and artist to artist with whispers of, Listen. It’s the best thing you’ll hear all year. In 2013, Meadows followed Killin’ Uncle Buzzy with the acclaimed Old Ghosts and Unfinished Business. “On Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, you’re listening to a guy trying to figure out how to get sober,” Meadows says. “Then two years later, I was sober, but I wasn’t that guy anymore. That’s what ‘Old Ghosts’ was––me just trying to move forward. I feel like this record is more accessible. People can listen and go, ‘Well, hell. I’ve done that, too.’”

An intimate record utilizing just Meadow’s blues-hewn voice and mostly acoustic guitar with pops of electric and other strings, First Cigarette is an intensely relatable meditation on love, acceptance, and redemption––an artistic and personal triumph, especially for a man whose early life was defined by loss and pain. At the age of two, Meadows watched his baby brother drown. When his parents divorced, he wound up living with his grandparents rather than either of his parents. “My dad went and got married and had a baby, and they were almost a normal family,” Meadows says. “And my mother also went and almost had a normal family, whatever that is.” His thick Mississippi accent makes the ‘r’ at the end of father and mother soft in his mouth. “I was over there with my grandparents like, ‘Well what the hell happened to me? Why am I not good enough to be part of that family?’ I carried that resentment for a long time.”

Adversity would remain a constant in Meadows’ youth. At the age of eleven, he began using drugs. At fourteen, he was diagnosed with cancer. He would go on to beat the disease, but not before it cost him his right leg from just below the knee. Meadows picked himself up and began playing drums––“They’d sneak me in the back door and I would play for people in bars”––but tired of lugging all that gear and picked up the harmonica. “I could put all my instruments in a Crown Royal bag, and I would sing and play the blues,” he says. Then, in his 20s, Meadows underwent another conversion: he became a Christian. He preached across the South and in 20-something countries for 17 years. “Preachers fall hard,” he says. “I had some questions I didn’t like the answers to. So I quit and went back to my old friend alcohol.”

First Cigarette benefits from all of the battles Meadows has lost and won, including his now seven years––and counting––of sobriety. Album opener “Sideways” is a gut punch. A blend of confession and advice, the song explores what happens when emotion is stifled. Meadows wrote “Sideways” after performing and speaking at an adolescent addiction treatment center. He asked the kids there, all younger than 18, if anyone wanted to share their story. A girl raised her hand, spoke, and broke Meadows’ heart. “She floored me,” he says. “I said, ‘Well, I’d want to get high too. How did that make you feel?’ One tear came down her cheek. She rubbed it away and said, ‘I don’t feel nothin’.’ One of the counselors and I were talking later. If the only tool you have is a hammer, you’re going to treat everything in your life like a nail.”

“Pray for Jungleland” channels Bruce Springsteen as it celebrates him, nostalgic for love at eighteen and a world that revolves around Friday night. Written with Drew Kennedy, the song is the first of several on the album that capture youth with misty-eyed levity––a departure from Uncle Buzzy that Meadows is clearly enjoying. “McDowell Road” serves as a thematic bookend for “Jungleland,” while the slow-building “Pontiac” offers anchoring advice and warm memories as hopes for young hearts.

A standout on an album stacked with gems, “First Cigarette” features searing vocals that shift back and forth between defiant muscle and naked delicacy. “I am little more content, I am little more content with who I am than who I was,” Meadows sings. “I have learned to love the comfort when it comes, like the first cigarette the morning buzz.” Written with Connie Harrington, “Hungry” showcases Meadows’ unique ability to haunt and soothe at the same time. “Hunger is the thing that motivates us to get up and try again,” he says. “I pray that I never lose that hunger.” The gorgeous “Better Boat” takes another moving look at Meadows’ hard-won contentment.

“Life can be a little challenging for all of us. It’s beautiful and it’s tragic, it’s awesome and it hurts,” Meadows says. “I hope people sense that through this record and want to come to a show, which is a lot of storytelling, a lot of tears, a lot of laughter. They’ll come face to face with a damn lot of humanity. I hope they see themselves in it.”

This Show is Sold Out!

Join our Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights for ‘Take Me Out to the Sounds Game’ for the Nashville Sounds vs. Omaha Storm Chasers

Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights present Take Me Out to the Sounds GameAlumni Relations has reserved open seating in the AMi Power Alley for our annual night out at the ballpark! This area accommodates 40 guests with a mix of high-top table seating, couches and standing room. The RSVP cost for this event is $10.00 per person, limit 4 tickets per family. Once you reserve your spot (using the form below), your ticket will be available for pickup on August 17th beginning at 6:00pm at the Right Field Entrance. Please contact Amy Lutz for more information.

Also, due to limited ticket availability, we ask that you make every effort to attend the event or make sure to cancel at least 48 hours prior to the event.


Join our Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights (ARCH) for Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

Don’t miss the Nashville Sounds taking on the Omaha Storm Chasers!

WHEN: August 17, 2019 at 7:00PM
WHERE: First Tennessee Park, home of the Nashville Sounds
WHO: Alumni Relations of Cumberland Heights (All CH Alumni and Friends invited!)
COST: $10.00 per person/ticket
UPDATE: We apologize bt as of 08/13/2019 we are currently sold out of tickets. If you’d like to put your name on the wait list, please email Amy Lutz at Amy_Lutz@cumberlandheights.org or call (615) 432-3009.


Since 1966, it has been Cumberland Heights’ mission to transform lives, giving hope to those affected by alcohol and drugs. Cumberland Heights recognizes addiction is a family disease and wants to provide support whenever possible. Our Family & Community Education Program is designed to provide education and support for those seeking recovery and those already taking the steps to transform their lives.

Event Details:

WHAT: Community Education Program
WHERE: Belle Meade United Methodist Church – 121 Davidson Road, Nashville, TN 37212 (*meet in room 125)
WHEN: Every 3rd Thursday of the month from 7:00PM -8:30PM

REGISTER HERE

For more information, please contact Stacy Bridges, Events Coordinator at stacy_bridges@cumberlandheights.org or call (615) 390-8224.

“Every Brilliant Thing” – Alumni Relations March Event

Event:

“Every Brilliant Thing” by Duncan Macmillian, with Jonny Donahoe
This one-woman play depicts a daughter who learns as a child that her mother has been hospitalized for doing, as her father puts it, “something stupid.” She resolves to show her mother that life is worth living, by writing a list of 1,000 brilliant things and leaving them on scraps of paper for her mother to find.

Details:

Description:

“Every Brilliant Thing” offers an unflinching view of chronic depression and the lengths we will go to for those we love. Far from being sad or tragic, the play approaches the topic with love and sincerity, with hope and even humor. This unique theater experience involves the audience in the story, evoking empathy, tears, laughter, insight and deep compassion.
After the show, a panel featuring Cumberland Heights staff & alumni will discuss the impact of mental illness on the family.

Tickets:

Alumni Event Registration & Ticket Purchase

  • STEP 1 - Personal Information

    The cost is $10.00 per person/ticket. Please also provide your name, email, cell & credit card information to hold your reservation. Please note tickets are non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund.

  • Ticket price total: .00

  • STEP 2 - Credit Card and Billing Information

    We accept MasterCard VISA American Express & Discover

    There is a required of $8.00 reservation per person that is non-refundable and will go to the Cumberland Heights Foundation General Donations Fund.

    Please fill out your name, credit card number, expiration month and year, and mailing address.

Trolley Tour of Nashville area Holiday LightsJoin us for a festive trolley tour of Nashville area holiday lights. We will board the trolley at Starbucks in the Belle Meade Plaza Shopping Center – Address: 4514 Harding Pike, Nashville, TN 37205, arrive early and get a holiday beverage on us!


WHAT: A festive trolley tour of Nashville area holiday lights
WHEN: Saturday, December 8th from 7:00PM – 10:00PM
COST: $8.00 (nonrefundable fee) per person – limited spaces available

The deadline to RSVP (signup form below) is Thursday, December 6th. This event may not be appropriate for small children due to the length of the tour as well as the seating arrangements on the trolley. If you RSVP and are unable to attend the event, please notify Jaime Gibbons by 12/6/18 – failure to cancel within the time frame indicated can result in higher costs and restricted participation in future events.

Wow! All available spots are gone!

Due to the overwhelming response we’ve had for our trolley tour, we’ve unfortunately run out of available spots. If you’d like to add your name(s) to the waiting list, please email Jaime Gibbons at jaime_gibbons@cumberlandheights.org

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Vaping, Juuling are the new Smoking for High School Kids

Flavored e-cigarette products and trendy new vaping devices like Juul are luring teenagers away from smoked cigarettes but keeping them hooked on nicotine, federal health officials said Thursday.

The latest tobacco use survey shows a drop in the number of high school students who use tobacco, from 24 percent in 2011 to about 20 percent in 2017.
The drop could potentially have been bigger. E-cigarettes were barely known in 2011, so virtually all teen tobacco users were smokers. Now, just under 13 percent of high school students smoke cigarettes.

Almost all of the rest are vaping a CDC Survey found. Join us for an educational discussion about current trends and what to do if you think your child may be vaping or juuling.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: Sage Hill Counseling 400 Overbeck Lane, Suite 202, Nashville
DATE: September 27, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 8:00PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT OUR SPEAKERS:

Chandler Ross, MSW
Chandler grew up in Nashville and then moved to the southwest. He lived in Arizona for 12 years working in hospitality and IT sales. After finishing undergrad at the Northern Arizona University, Chandler moved back to Nashville to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Tennessee for Social Work. Since then, Chandler has worked for Cumberland Heights in admissions and intake, Big Brother Big Sister as a family interviewer, and the Oasis Center for Youth as a family therapist. Chandler has a heart for adolescents and young people experiencing grief, trauma, substance abuse issues, depression and anxiety and feeling disconnected from family. Outside of therapy, Chandler enjoys gardening, cooking, road trips in the south and writing silly stories on the internet.

Amara Schweinberg, MA
Amara currently serves as the Adolescent Admissions and Outreach Specialist for Cumberland Heights. She provides assessments for the adolescent population and is also vital in the admissions process in regards to tours, assessments, insurance authorization, and phone screenings. In addition, Amara also serves in an outreach role by marketing to the local and regional communities for the current Adolescent Program and the new adolescent recovery center, ARCH Academy opening in 2019. Amara joined the Cumberland Heights team in 2012.

Amara has served as an Administrative Assistant in the Intake Department at Cumberland Heights before advancing to a Senior Admissions Counselor. She obtained her Master’s Degree in Counseling at Trevecca Nazarene University and completed her internship in the Counselor Department of a local private high school.

Healing from Addictions, Cravings, and Choiceless Behaviors

A Workshop for Those Who Suffer and for Those Who Love Them

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent CommunicationIn an ideal world, our emotional needs are met with warmth and understanding from the earliest age. For many of us, this is not the case. Instead we experience loneliness, internal conflicts and overwhelming emotional pain. Addictions and choiceless behaviors often become the brain’s creative strategies for survival.

Sarah Peyton, a certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, will teach us how to disentangle nervous system wiring which keeps us locked in these unhealthy patterns. Join us to experience the way Sarah’s innovative work can support the healing process.

Workshop Details:

Workshop pricing: Early-bird $225; after August 1st $275


REGISTER NOW


During the workshop, we will explore:

  • The connection between the latest brain research and the “decisions” we make that lead us toward and away from addictions and compulsions;
  • How to counteract old patterns to support healthy decision making;
  • How to leverage our own empathy skills to bring ourselves relief

If this workshop appeals to you and cost is the only barrier, please contact Melissa Red to discuss how we can help support your attendance.

Workshop site/venue:

United Methodist Publishing HouseUnited Methodist Publishing House
2222 Rosa L. Parks Blvd.
Nashville, TN 37228

(A short distance north of downtown Nashville — 3 miles — with plenty of free parking)

Workshop Dates:

Date and Times: September 22/23, 2018

  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 | 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 
    Family Constellations (optional; no additional fee)
  • Sunday, September 23, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop presenter:

Sarah Peyton speaks and writes internationally on the confluence of NVC, Family Constellation work and the world of neuroscience research. Author of the recently published book, Your Resonant Self: Guided Meditations and Exercises to Engage Your Brain’s Capacity for Healing, Sarah has a passion for weaving together neuroscience knowledge and experiences of healing to support brain and body connection. Funny, touching, and filled with personal stories and up-to-date research on our nervous systems, her presentations change lives and invite the healing and self-compassion that comes from hearing ourselves and others deeply. For more information about Sarah see www.empathybrain.com.

Davidson County Community Education Program

EVENT TOPIC: Addiction Effects the Entire Family

Addiction is a family disease that stresses the family to the breaking point, impacts the stability of the home, the family’s unity, mental health, physical health, finances, and overall family dynamics. Join us to learn about how your family might be effected and what you can do to support yourself, your family and your loved ones who may be struggling with substance use.

Davidson County Community Education

EVENT DETAILS:

LOCATION: Bellevue Family YMCA – 8101 TN-100 Nashville, TN 37212
DATE: July 26, 2018
TIME: 6:00PM – 8:00PM

REGISTER NOW!

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER:

Meet Our Speaker Kristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland HeightsKristy Roll, LCSW is the Director of Family Services at Cumberland Heights. Kristy has been a counselor for 15 years working mostly in addiction treatment but also began her career working in community mental health. Kristy received her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern Indiana. Kristy is trained in EMDR. Kristy has worked with children, adolescents, young adults and adults providing individual and family therapy. Kristy moved to Nashville from Indiana in 2008, joining the Cumberland Heights team in 2012.

Cumberland Heights Designated an Aetna Institute of Quality®

Nonprofit treatment center Cumberland Heights has been designated an Aetna Institute of Quality® for Behavioral Health – Substance Abuse.

Aetna makes information about the quality and cost of health care services available to its members to help them make informed decisions about their health care needs. In line with this goal, Aetna recognizes facilities in its network that offer specialized clinical services and exemplify:

  • Excellence in care
  • Commitment to continuous improvement
  • Meeting certain standards of quality
  • Cost efficiency

Aetna recognizes facilities that have earned this designation by identifying them in the directory as an Institute of Quality provider. This designation helps members choose consistent high quality care.

The Institute of Quality validates the great work Cumberland Heights does every day to help patients and families suffering from alcohol and drug addiction. Designations like this are a total team effort that begins with the first phone call and extends through a lifetime of recovery opportunities.

~Cumberland Heights Chief Executive Officer Jay Crosson

Since 1966, Cumberland Heights has helped thousands of patients recover life from the disease of alcohol and drug addiction. Every year, approximately 2,500 patients seek treatment at its River Road facility, 12 intensive outpatient treatment centers throughout Tennessee and 12-Step immersion programs.


Recovery is Possible

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Your gift to Cumberland Heights through our annual and capital initiates gives immediate support to patients and their families. To make a longer term impact a gift to the endowment fund will provide patient assistance funding for years to come.

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